'there is much honor in him' or 'there is much honor in his heart'

Latin translation: Magna honestas inest ei/inest cordi suo

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:'there is much honor in him' or 'there is much honor in his heart'
Latin translation:Magna honestas inest ei/inest cordi suo
Entered by: Joseph Brazauskas

15:49 Apr 19, 2005
English to Latin translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
English term or phrase: 'there is much honor in him' or 'there is much honor in his heart'
as it is
Brian
Magna honestas inest ei/inest cordi suo
Explanation:
Or 'Magna fides inest ei/inest cordi suo (or 'eius').

You could also use 'animo' or even 'menti' (or 'in corde', 'in animo' or 'in mente'--Cicero prefers 'in' + the ablative, Sallust and Livy the dative construction) instead of 'cordi'.

'Multa honestas' might be possible, but 'multa' is more usual when measuring number, 'magna' when measuring quantity; 'multa honestas' (or 'multus honos') would mean 'many an honour is in him, etc.'. I should also prefer 'honestas' ('moral probity, soundness of character') or 'fides' ('good faith, trustiworthiness, etc.' to 'honos', as the latter is more commonly used of outward signs of respect rather than one's personality, especially of the distinction or honour of attaining to magistracies and senatorial office. But this would depend upon the nuance you want to give it.

Selected response from:

Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +3Magna honestas inest ei/inest cordi suo
Joseph Brazauskas
4 +3multus honus in eo / in corde suo (est)
Deschant
5ei in pectore permagnus honor (permagnum decus) est
Marta Chmielowiec


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
multus honus in eo / in corde suo (est)


Explanation:
I would not use "est" (=is) as Latin tends to omit it when possible.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 23 mins (2005-04-19 17:13:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Another possibility:

in the second sentence, \"eius\" instead of \"suo\".

Deschant
Local time: 23:23
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in GalicianGalician
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
37 mins
  -> Thank you!

agree  Joseph Brazauskas: 'Honos' (or 'honor').
41 mins
  -> Ops! Of course, thank you

agree  Valentini Mellas
1 hr
  -> Thank you!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Magna honestas inest ei/inest cordi suo


Explanation:
Or 'Magna fides inest ei/inest cordi suo (or 'eius').

You could also use 'animo' or even 'menti' (or 'in corde', 'in animo' or 'in mente'--Cicero prefers 'in' + the ablative, Sallust and Livy the dative construction) instead of 'cordi'.

'Multa honestas' might be possible, but 'multa' is more usual when measuring number, 'magna' when measuring quantity; 'multa honestas' (or 'multus honos') would mean 'many an honour is in him, etc.'. I should also prefer 'honestas' ('moral probity, soundness of character') or 'fides' ('good faith, trustiworthiness, etc.' to 'honos', as the latter is more commonly used of outward signs of respect rather than one's personality, especially of the distinction or honour of attaining to magistracies and senatorial office. But this would depend upon the nuance you want to give it.



Joseph Brazauskas
United States
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 72

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Valentini Mellas
4 mins
  -> Maximas tibi gratias ago.

agree  sonja29 (X)
2 hrs
  -> Bene facis.

agree  Linnea16
1 day 20 mins
  -> Thanks.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
ei in pectore permagnus honor (permagnum decus) est


Explanation:
you could also say "maximus honor" as Latin likes to use superlatives not in their absolute meaning (maximus - the greatest), but emphatically (maximus - a very big / great)

Vale!
take care
mc
x

Marta Chmielowiec
Local time: 00:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PolishPolish
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search