respects (and compliments)

Russian translation: почтение

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:respects
Russian translation:почтение
Entered by: Robert Donahue (X)

10:54 Apr 19, 2005
English to Russian translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Military / Defense / Military Customs and Courtesies
English term or phrase: respects (and compliments)
I don't expect this to be particuraly easy. This is neither уважение nor комплименты. Been wracking my brain over this for a while, no luck. I appreciate any help that you'd be able to provide. Thanks in advance.

A junior officer sending a verbal message to a senior instructs the messenger to present his "respects" to the admiral or captain or whomever; the senior replies by presenting his "compliments."
When an officer reports on board ship, he should call on the commander within 48 hours. A junior never presents his "compliments" to a senior; instead, he "pays his respects." It's courteous, but not required, to leave a calling card.
http://home.earthlink.net/~mcmillanj/customs/trads.html
http://www.airforcewives.com/protocol/ch18.html
Robert Donahue (X)
почтение
Explanation:
In an official exchange of amenities it usually means "засвидетельствовать свое почтение".

In response official people usualy thank for the courtesy -- "благодарят за любезность".

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Note added at 21 mins (2005-04-19 11:16:10 GMT)
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OK, so the messenger starts:

\"...Капитан Смит свидетельствует Вам свое почтение и сообщает... blah-blah\"

When he returns, he tells to the Captain:

\"...Генерал Джонс благодарит Вас за любезность и извещает ...blah-blah...\"

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Note added at 25 mins (2005-04-19 11:19:52 GMT)
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Btw, in Russian these formulas apply not only to a military context. Such sorts of exchange is rather old-fashioned, of course, but it was a common thing in communication, say, among aristocrats in Tsar Russia. :)

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Note added at 35 mins (2005-04-19 11:29:20 GMT)
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It may also happen in a direct dialog between `the General\' and `the Captain\':

Captain: Господин генерал, позвольте засвидетельствовать Вам свое почтение!

General: Вы очень любезны, капитан.

As you described it\'s very unlikely that the General would свидетельствовать почтение to the Captain and vice versa. Also note: the Captain says \"господин генерал\" (\"товарищ генерал\" in the Soviet times) while the General will usually say simply \"капитан\". ;-)
Selected response from:

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 00:53
Grading comment
Easily one of the best explanations I've seen. Thank you very much Kirill!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +3почтение
Kirill Semenov


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
почтение


Explanation:
In an official exchange of amenities it usually means "засвидетельствовать свое почтение".

In response official people usualy thank for the courtesy -- "благодарят за любезность".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 mins (2005-04-19 11:16:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK, so the messenger starts:

\"...Капитан Смит свидетельствует Вам свое почтение и сообщает... blah-blah\"

When he returns, he tells to the Captain:

\"...Генерал Джонс благодарит Вас за любезность и извещает ...blah-blah...\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2005-04-19 11:19:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Btw, in Russian these formulas apply not only to a military context. Such sorts of exchange is rather old-fashioned, of course, but it was a common thing in communication, say, among aristocrats in Tsar Russia. :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 35 mins (2005-04-19 11:29:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It may also happen in a direct dialog between `the General\' and `the Captain\':

Captain: Господин генерал, позвольте засвидетельствовать Вам свое почтение!

General: Вы очень любезны, капитан.

As you described it\'s very unlikely that the General would свидетельствовать почтение to the Captain and vice versa. Also note: the Captain says \"господин генерал\" (\"товарищ генерал\" in the Soviet times) while the General will usually say simply \"капитан\". ;-)

Kirill Semenov
Ukraine
Local time: 00:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 58
Grading comment
Easily one of the best explanations I've seen. Thank you very much Kirill!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andrey Belousov (X)
9 mins

agree  Alexander Taguiltsev
19 mins

agree  Olga-Translator
1 hr
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