Space-What-Have-Yous

Spanish translation: Bocazas autopublicitarios del espacio

07:02 Feb 1, 2001
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: Space-What-Have-Yous
Please someone explain me the meaning of the following, esp. "Space-What-Have-Yous"

"Talking to a chap, went on Gavin. "Seemed a decent sort of bloke. Got
one of those Saab jobs. Makes a lot of sense. >now goes the part I just don´t
get> It´s going right down (italicized) that pub, though. Bloody
Space-What-Have-Yous bleeping all over the place. Like a bloody madhouse
down there now."
Roman Orekhov
Russian Federation
Local time: 16:27
Spanish translation:Bocazas autopublicitarios del espacio
Explanation:
"Pero el asunto hasta alcanza a ese bar. Malditos bocazas autopublicitarios del espacio
pululando por todos lados. Es como una maldita casa de locos lo que hay ahí abajo ahora". Hola, that's my version of it. Upon what I gather "what have yous" means something like "what have you got to say about yourself". I've this I've that, can do this can do that.This people seem to have a lot to say about themselves ans it's space-related (rockets, satellite-construction, Swedes (Saab) going to Mars now? Saab is an aeronautical/car company. This guys are all looking for that great Saab job so they behave like walking CVs. Problem is a "what question" has been turned into a noun phrase and that's stretching it a bit in Spanish. I'd go for "bocazas" because they can't stop talking it seems. But need something like "autopublicitarios" (+ or - : "self-publicizing") to convey more meaning. More context would help, but it can't be too far from what I'm suggesting. Here (link 1) there's an instance of the use of "what-have-yous": "Personal demos, experiments, and what-have-yous
* A simple Text-to-Speech applet.
* Lightning Banner. Eric's humble contribution to the world of web-banners.
* Ripple effect. Nothing like a little pixel manipulation.
* An implementation of the Sketch applet which provides streaming animation with minimum download. Another example is available (a slightly earlier version).
* More to come. " Good luck with it, cheers :-)
Selected response from:

Paul Roige (X)
Spain
Local time: 15:27
Grading comment
Thanks to all who bothered to answer, I´m giving the point to the first answerer, but a real good guess was made by
our colleague who answered this question ("I´m at a loss" English-Russian). Space-
What-Have-Yous refer to freshly installed arcade games, which, sure enough, get on Gavin´s nerves by bleeping all over the place.

Thanks again and good luck! ;-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
naTo expand upon my previous contribution
Robert Dillon
naSee below,
Ramón Solá
nalo siguiente
trans4u (X)
naMaldito espacio el que tenéis
Kenji Otomo
naVa de mal en peor ese bar.
Robert Dillon
naBocazas autopublicitarios del espacio
Paul Roige (X)


  

Answers


44 mins
Bocazas autopublicitarios del espacio


Explanation:
"Pero el asunto hasta alcanza a ese bar. Malditos bocazas autopublicitarios del espacio
pululando por todos lados. Es como una maldita casa de locos lo que hay ahí abajo ahora". Hola, that's my version of it. Upon what I gather "what have yous" means something like "what have you got to say about yourself". I've this I've that, can do this can do that.This people seem to have a lot to say about themselves ans it's space-related (rockets, satellite-construction, Swedes (Saab) going to Mars now? Saab is an aeronautical/car company. This guys are all looking for that great Saab job so they behave like walking CVs. Problem is a "what question" has been turned into a noun phrase and that's stretching it a bit in Spanish. I'd go for "bocazas" because they can't stop talking it seems. But need something like "autopublicitarios" (+ or - : "self-publicizing") to convey more meaning. More context would help, but it can't be too far from what I'm suggesting. Here (link 1) there's an instance of the use of "what-have-yous": "Personal demos, experiments, and what-have-yous
* A simple Text-to-Speech applet.
* Lightning Banner. Eric's humble contribution to the world of web-banners.
* Ripple effect. Nothing like a little pixel manipulation.
* An implementation of the Sketch applet which provides streaming animation with minimum download. Another example is available (a slightly earlier version).
* More to come. " Good luck with it, cheers :-)



    Reference: http://pv1fd.pav1.hotmail.msn.com/cgi-bin/getmsg?curmbox=F00...
Paul Roige (X)
Spain
Local time: 15:27
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in CatalanCatalan
PRO pts in pair: 666
Grading comment
Thanks to all who bothered to answer, I´m giving the point to the first answerer, but a real good guess was made by
our colleague who answered this question ("I´m at a loss" English-Russian). Space-
What-Have-Yous refer to freshly installed arcade games, which, sure enough, get on Gavin´s nerves by bleeping all over the place.

Thanks again and good luck! ;-)
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1 hr
Va de mal en peor ese bar.


Explanation:
Malditos chismes marcianos haciendo bip bip por todos lados. Parece casa de locos.

Seguramente podrás mejorar la traducción, pero creo que da la idea de lo que quiere decir.

Parece ser una queja contra la "tematización" de un bar, aunque también podría ser una referencia a los teléfonos celulares de los clientes.

Quizás el contexto te ayudará.

Robert Dillon
Mexico
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 42
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1 hr
Maldito espacio el que tenéis


Explanation:
Existe una tendencia en la lengua inglesa de crear una misma palabra por medio de las unión de varias con una serie de guiones (por ejemplo space-lab: laboratorio espacial)como un instrumento para que prestemos más atención en el significado. A veces puede tener un sentido irónico y otras veces encierra una crítica mordaz.

Aqui creo que es una ironía. La traducción de la frase sería: "Maldito el espacio que tenéis para pitar (hacer bip)por todo el lugar".

También podrias tener problema con "Yous". Probablemente el texto que estés traduciendo esté localizado en el norte de Inglaterra o los personajes sean de allí. En este lugar es muy común utilizar "Yous" como "You". La lengua inglesa utiliza "You" tanto para referirse a "TÚ" como a "Vosotros". Sin embargo en Newcastle han optado por diferenciar, y "Yous" significa "Vosotros".


    Personal Experience
Kenji Otomo
Spain
Local time: 15:27
PRO pts in pair: 127
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1 hr
lo siguiente


Explanation:
El ir a ese bar. Mendigos locos de remate, haciendo ruido por todos lados. Como un mendigo manicomio allí ahorita.

B. Suerte!

Bye

trans4u (X)
PRO pts in pair: 387
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3 hrs
To expand upon my previous contribution


Explanation:
Just to shed some light before matters get completely out of hand:

'What have you' (without the hyphens) is a common English (not especially British) expression which roughly means 'etc.' (e.g. 'pens, pencils, rulers, what have you'). It can come in handy, when imagination, breath, or patience runs out.

Here however, it's being used as a substantive (hyphens often indicate this kind of change), and it's been pluralized to what-have-yous by adding 's' in the normal way (this is not a particularly Northern British usage). In this context, it's simply another way of saying 'whatsits', 'thingys', 'thingumabobs'
(all listed as chisme, cosa, etc. in any bilingual dictionary).
'Space what-have-yous' then could be 'un montón de cosas que tienen que ver con el espacio', or as I tentatively suggested 'chismes espaciales' (ok, I said 'marcianos')

The reference to the pub 'going right down' means that the pub is no longer as good as it used to be.
My guess is that this is because it's been given some sort of theme(a space theme?). While the English public in general seems to love pubs with some sort of theme, there's a long tradition of English novelists satirizing them (possibly because they make a fairly easy target). A disgruntled customer is frequently their mouthpiece.

The Saab reference: I didn't mention this because you didn't ask but
the implication and 'humour' is that because Saabs are sensible cars, the speaker believes the owner must have been a decent chap. (It's *dramatic irony*, in other words)


Robert Dillon
Mexico
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 42
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15 hrs
See below,


Explanation:
Areldee makes sense. One thing, though. Since we're translating literary stuff here, I'd suggest "artilugio" instead of "chisme", and "manicomio" instead of "casa de locos"...

Ramón Solá
Local time: 08:27
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3952
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