Scoring exercise

Spanish translation: Ejercicio de escrutinio/selección/calificación/puntuación

14:16 Oct 14, 2020
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Human Resources / A letter against a redundancy
English term or phrase: Scoring exercise
Hello all!!
I hope someone can help me with this:

In a letter opposing a redundancy it reads:

"Whilst you suggest that our clients were in unique positions and therefore your client was not required to undertake any scoring exercise, it is clear from how their duties are now being undertaken that their roles were potentially interchangeable with other employees..."

Does it refer to a proper "exercise" to see whose duties have the lowest score, so they can make them redundant? Or am I missing an important legal term such as "agravio"?

Many thanks!!

Pamela
Pamela Olea
United Kingdom
Local time: 04:25
Spanish translation:Ejercicio de escrutinio/selección/calificación/puntuación
Explanation:
The term of your query, “scoring”, refers to the assessment of an amployee´s worthiness performed by an employer when they are thinking of making people redundant. The list of redundancy selection criteria is made up of objective and subjective yardsticks, as you can see in the link below, and the process of applying them to “choose the candidates for dismissal” is the “scoring” (may I be permitted to use the ironical tone).

The context you provide is quite confusing to me (what a pity not to have a bit more to clear doubts), so I am unable to ascertain what “exercise” exactly refers here to, but I believe the Spanish word “ejercicio” is as neutral, i.e. vague, as the English counterpart “exercise” and by using it in the expression “ejercicio de escrutinio/selección” not much could go wrong, I believe.

As for your last question, if a “legal” term is behind the source expression, I definitively do not think so. “Scoring” is just the noun derived from the verb “to score”, with the meaning here of identifying the proper “candidates” for redundancy.

This link complements those already posted by Taña and I hope by reading its information you will be certain what this is actually about:

https://www.masonbullock.co.uk/redundancy-selection-criteria...
What Redundancy Selection Criteria Should Your Employer Use?
If your employer believes they need to make redundancies, they will need to follow a fair procedure before deciding who to make redundant.
This includes choosing the right criteria by which they can decide which of their staff to make redundant. This article explains the types of criteria your employer should be applying.
(…)
Ideally, your employer should use objective criteria. However, the commercial reality is that employers can’t always assess an employee against objective criteria. As in area of business development, there’s always room for personal judgment and opinion.
There is no obligation on an employer to use objective criteria. However, employers do have to use reasonable criteria and score people reasonably. This may be easier for your employer to prove if they have applied objective selection criteria.
(…)
Having carried out the scoring exercise, your employer can then make a reasonable decision as to who should be made redundant. Although you are entitled to see the scores you have been given, your employer doesn’t have to show you how your colleagues were scored.

Selected response from:

Toni Castano
Spain
Local time: 05:25
Grading comment
Muchas gracias!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3Ejercicio de escrutinio/selección/calificación/puntuación
Toni Castano
Summary of reference entries provided
Refs.
Taña Dalglish

  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
scoring exercise
Ejercicio de escrutinio/selección/calificación/puntuación


Explanation:
The term of your query, “scoring”, refers to the assessment of an amployee´s worthiness performed by an employer when they are thinking of making people redundant. The list of redundancy selection criteria is made up of objective and subjective yardsticks, as you can see in the link below, and the process of applying them to “choose the candidates for dismissal” is the “scoring” (may I be permitted to use the ironical tone).

The context you provide is quite confusing to me (what a pity not to have a bit more to clear doubts), so I am unable to ascertain what “exercise” exactly refers here to, but I believe the Spanish word “ejercicio” is as neutral, i.e. vague, as the English counterpart “exercise” and by using it in the expression “ejercicio de escrutinio/selección” not much could go wrong, I believe.

As for your last question, if a “legal” term is behind the source expression, I definitively do not think so. “Scoring” is just the noun derived from the verb “to score”, with the meaning here of identifying the proper “candidates” for redundancy.

This link complements those already posted by Taña and I hope by reading its information you will be certain what this is actually about:

https://www.masonbullock.co.uk/redundancy-selection-criteria...
What Redundancy Selection Criteria Should Your Employer Use?
If your employer believes they need to make redundancies, they will need to follow a fair procedure before deciding who to make redundant.
This includes choosing the right criteria by which they can decide which of their staff to make redundant. This article explains the types of criteria your employer should be applying.
(…)
Ideally, your employer should use objective criteria. However, the commercial reality is that employers can’t always assess an employee against objective criteria. As in area of business development, there’s always room for personal judgment and opinion.
There is no obligation on an employer to use objective criteria. However, employers do have to use reasonable criteria and score people reasonably. This may be easier for your employer to prove if they have applied objective selection criteria.
(…)
Having carried out the scoring exercise, your employer can then make a reasonable decision as to who should be made redundant. Although you are entitled to see the scores you have been given, your employer doesn’t have to show you how your colleagues were scored.



Toni Castano
Spain
Local time: 05:25
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Muchas gracias!
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Reference comments


33 mins peer agreement (net): +1
Reference: Refs.

Reference information:
How to ensure a fair redundancy selection processwww.personneltoday.com › ensure-fair-redundancy-sel...
Oct 11, 2016 — Employers who fail to get the redundancy selection process right are ... Ensure redundancy selection criteria are so far as practicable objective and job- ... Bear in mind that someone who is put at risk after a scoring exercise ...https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/ensure-fair-redundancy-sel...
Ensure you have evidence to support an employee’s score
One thing we come across regularly is managers who are unable to point to hard evidence, such as personnel records or appraisal forms, to support the scores allocated as part of the selection process. Not only does this leave scope for the employee to challenge the **scoring process**, but it also increases the risk of a tribunal claim.


https://www.employmentlawworldview.com/recent-redundancy-exe...
Ensure selection criteria are clear and address the challenges faced by the business

We all know that you need to use selection criteria that are so far as practicable objective and job-related. This can sometimes be more easily said than done. Ideally the managers running the business should be involved in selecting the criteria to ensure you retain those employees with the skills and experience you require in the business going forward.

Think also about the weighting of your criteria – is a 3 in “time-keeping” really as valuable as a 3 in “business development skills”? If certain attributes are more important to the company’s future than others, then reflect this in the weightings or you will find your selection decisions hobbled by good scores in unimportant respects.

On a related point, keep your scoring simple, 1 to 5 at most. Bear in mind that someone who is put at risk after a **scoring exercise** may have only a point or two off safety, so the ability to defend and justify that gap will be paramount. If you score out of 10, therefore, you will need to be able to explain what separates a 6 from a 7 or an 8 from a 9 in each criterion, which will be substantially impossible in most cases since the gradations are too fine.



What consultation must an employer undertake before making ...worksmart.org.uk › losing-your-job › redundancy › w... https://worksmart.org.uk/work-rights/losing-your-job/redunda...
In every redundancy, the employer should consult as far in advance as possible. ... the chance to comment on their individual results in any **scoring exercise.**

Employees at risk of redundancy must be given the chance to comment on their individual results in any scoring exercise.

Where it is intended to make 20 or more employees redundant, the employer must inform and consult the recognised union at least 30 days before notice is given of any dismissals. This rises to at least 45 days where 100 or more redundancies are involved.


http://resources.xperthr.co.uk/surveys/respondents/XpertHR_a...
Summary
 Draw up a redundancy selection matrix to carry out the **scoring exercise** for each
employee in the redundancy pool.
 Ensure that, as far as possible, selection criteria are objective and measurable and
not based on subjective opinion.

Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 45

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Toni Castano: See my answer above. I agree with the interpretation provided by your links [stay safe, regards].
52 mins
  -> Thanks Toni and the very same to you!
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