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This law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”

Spanish translation: Esta ley prohíbe (a las compañías) la explotación de las direcciones de Internet (URL)

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:This law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
Spanish translation:Esta ley prohíbe (a las compañías) la explotación de las direcciones de Internet (URL)
Entered by: InGoodSpanish

19:20 Apr 15, 2005
English to Spanish translations [PRO]
Law (general)
English term or phrase: This law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
This law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
InGoodSpanish
Local time: 09:59
Esta ley prohíbe (a las compañías) la explotación de las direcciones de Internet (URL)
Explanation:
No sé si "las compañías/empresas" sea redundante aquí.


http://www.freesearch.co.uk/dictionary/cybersquatting
cybersquatting

noun {U}

when someone pays to officially take a famous name as an Internet address, so that they can later sell it for a high price to the person or organization with that name
cybersquat

verb {I} -tt- cybersquatter

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2005-04-15 19:37:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Cybersquatting\" no necesariamente es tomar una marca comercial y registrarla como un dominio en Internet, como, por ejemplo, registrar el dominio www.mcdonalds.com [si es que la corporación McDonald\'s no lo tiene registrado].

También se refiere a tomar un nombre famoso, como por ejemplo el de un actor, digamos, y registrarlo, para luego vender ese dominio al mejor postor. O sea, explotarlo. De eso se trata.

Ya ha ocurrido... recuerdo el caso de un cantante o actor famoso, alguien (un Fulano de Tal cualquiera) registró un dominio con el nombre del famoso y luego dicho famoso lo demandó o algo por el estilo. Creo que era Tom Jones o no sé...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2005-04-15 19:40:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

En vez de \"direcciones de Internet\", quizá sea mejor decir \"dominios\":

\"Esta ley prohíbe la explotación de dominios de Internet\"



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2005-04-15 19:47:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

www.jackpalance.com

Celebrity Name Cybersquatting

Entrepreneurial predators silently grope through the yet unkempt wilderness of cyberspace in quest of any opportunity to make quick money. A new boom known as \'cybersquatting\' is a prime example. A growing number of neer-do-wells register the personal names of famous people (as domain names) with the intent to sell them for enormous profits.

To counter this practice, the \'Anti-Cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act\' was enacted. Any person who registers a living celebrity\'s name with the proven intent to make money from the sale of that name, may be sued.

However, the Act comes up short. What happens if the one who registers the name bears the same name as the celebrity? What about the dead? And what about those stars who choose not to take legal action, or are not aware that vulnerable names are important to register? No protection!

Out of curiosity, when first aware of the Act, I began to search for unregistered TV and movie stars. I was appalled to find that such names as Jack Palance, Richard Widmark and Robert Duval - all alive and active at the time - had not been registered. Immediately, I registered their names just to keep some entrepreneurial parasite from taking advantage.

To date, I have captured about 15 names for safe keeping, some alive, most dead. The expense is not so great that it is even worth talking about. At no charge, I will be more than honored to transfer domain name ownership.

A person\'s name is important. Please help me find unregistered celebrity names - living or deceased - so that they can be registered (.com only) and kept in a safe haven until claimed by the ones who should rightfully hold them. Finders will be given credit for their find. Thank you!






http://www.ipnewsblog.com/article/17 u.s.c./fair use
Cheney\'s Domain Name Slip-Up
Submitted by Vinod Shankar on Wed, 10/06/2004 - 9:35pm.
Over on Factcheck.org, a \"nonpartisan, nonprofit, \'consumer advocate\' for voters.\" The website Cheney announced was actually pointed to an anti-Bush website, GeorgeSoros.com. There is a report here that Factcheck.com was dead during the debate. So was this an amazingly quick stab at cybersquatting by GeorgeSoros.com? If it was a bad faith attempt to cybersquat, then I\'d guess this could be a case of initial interest confusion. An interesting question, because I\'m not sure if is really bad faith. Cheney said a URL in a debate, but it wasn\'t one he\'s associated with. If that URL has no owner, isn\'t it free game? Even for an anti-Cheney message?






--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 40 mins (2005-04-15 20:00:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Un artículo muy interesante:

http://speakout.com/activism/issue_briefs/1263b-1.html

Should Cybersquatting be Treated as a Trademark Violation?

by John Barry
Thursday, April 27, 2000

In California, on August 23, the battle against cybersquatting took an important turn as Governor Gray Davis signed into a law a bill that makes it illegal to register Internet names of other people with \"bad faith\" intent. Under this bill, trademark protection is extended to names of celebrities (and the heirs of celebrities) which federal law did not cover earlier. Under this law, courts can order \"squatters\" to restore money that they have gained through this practice and pay $2,500 per incident.

On August 7, the family of rock star Jimi Hendrix won a case against the holder of the Internet address www.jimihendrix.com. The Geneva-based World Intellectual Court ruled that by using the guitar hero\'s name in the website, the owners of the domain name had violated copyright laws. The family owns the name Jimi Hendrix under common law. This is only one of several lawsuits pending in which celebrities - including Julia Roberts and Jethro Tull - have begun to sue to evict cybersquatters.

Many cybersquatters have been using domain names as a way of hijacking legitimate businesses, often by using their names in pornographic websites. Bargainbid.com was the domain name of an Internet start-up based in New York City. It presumably attracted people who were interested in buying computer-related goods through an auction over the Internet. But potential customers who left out the second \"a\" would log onto something different: \"We decided to get out of the auction business, but don\'t despair! Coming soon! Jungle Love and Down on the Farm! Featuring: All along the Hitching Post, Mississippi Sheep are Easy.\"

Hundreds of other high profile businesses have found that when people mispell their names, they wind up where they never intended to be: in pictures of people engaged in sex acts, and other pornographic images. This is all the work of cybersquatters: people who profit from the domain name which includes - or resembles - the name of a famous company or person. Some domain names can be purchased for about $35, registered on the World Wide Web. Those names can then be sold at a large profit to pornographic websites who want to attract new viewers to their websites, or to the nameholders themselves, who don\'t want to be associated with bondage gear. Dan Parisi of New Jersey, for instance, used the White House as a way of launching his infamous \"whitehouse.com\" pornographic website. Largely because of the name, his site gets 500,000 visits a month. Is this a legitimate way of doing business? While most agree that this cybersquatting is a shady route to riches, the legal grounds for prosecuting them is shaky. For the first time, names are being given trademark status and protection under the law. While many in California will welcome Governor Gray\'s bill (which passed unanimously), the legal implications are going to be sticky. Does this mean you can\'t have a web site with the name of an up-and-coming movie actor? Or does it mean that words like \"Madonna\" or \"Sting\" have become the exclusive property of the celebrities who picked them?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 42 mins (2005-04-15 20:02:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Cybersquatting = también llamado \"ciberocupación\". Y ya me callo :P


ponencia11 - [ Translate this page ]
... el combate contra prácticas aberrantes (cybersquatting también llamado domain
name grabbing, que en español ya se ha traducido por \"ciberocupación\"). ...
comunidad.derecho.org/congreso/ponencia26.html - 97k - Cached - Similar pages

Diccionario tecnico - [ Translate this page ]
... CYBERSQUATTING Es el término utilizado en Internet para referirse a la acción de
... También llamado \"farming\". Es el hecho de disponer de un servidor ...
www.fce.unl.edu.ar/ecommerce/diccionario.htm - 47k - Cached - Similar pages

Hipermarketing - Comercio Electrónico - [ Translate this page ]
... L a práctica del llamado \"cybersquatting\", o piratería de nombres de dominio va
... También incluye la apropiación de nombres sociales, slogans y frases ...
www.hipermarketing.com/nuevo 4/contenido/ e-business/comercio%20electronico/nivel3disputa.html - 14k - Cached - Similar pages

[DOC] Marcas y Nombres de Dominio
File Format: Microsoft Word 2000 - View as HTML
... así como también su utilización como plataforma comercial, ha generado la ...
originaron la práctica conocida como “cybersquatting”, consistente en el ...
www.camparaguay.com/descargar/usoabusivo.doc - Similar pages

[PDF] DOMINIOS: SISTEMAS DE NOMBRES Y REGISTROS DE NOMBRES 1 ...
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
... Cybersquatting: piratería cibernética.- ... También llamado anfitrión (host).
Es el ordenador que tiene el software y los datos (zone file), ...
www.ccee.edu.uy/ensenian/catderpu/material/dominio.PDF - Similar pages

[PDF] DEFENSA DE NOMBRES DE DOMINIO CIBEROCUPADOS José Ovidio Salgueiro ...
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
... También llamado DNS por sus siglas en inglés (Domain Name System) y URL por
las siglas en ... “cybersquatting”, “ciberpiratería” o “ciberocupación”. ...
www.iberolatino.org.ar/download.php?select=23 - Similar pages


Selected response from:

María Teresa Taylor Oliver
Panama
Local time: 07:59
Grading comment
Excelente!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2apropiarse de direcciones de Internet que contengan nombres registrados por otras compañías
Ivannia Garcia
5 +1esta ley prohibe a las empresas la usurpación de nombres de dominio
Rebecca Jowers
4 +2Esta ley prohíbe (a las compañías) la explotación de las direcciones de Internet (URL)
María Teresa Taylor Oliver
5esta ley hace que sea delito que las empresas se larguen simplemente a invadir las direcciones...
Margarita Palatnik (X)
5esta ley prohibe a las empresas ocupar direcciones de Internet para impedir a la competencia
Marcelo González
4 -1Conforme esta ley la explotación de direcciones de Internet registradas configura un delito / o...
Mariela Barcelo


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
this law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
esta ley hace que sea delito que las empresas se larguen simplemente a invadir las direcciones...


Explanation:
en Internet

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 min (2005-04-15 19:22:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

o de Internet...

Margarita Palatnik (X)
Local time: 09:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 530
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
this law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
apropiarse de direcciones de Internet que contengan nombres registrados por otras compañías


Explanation:
esta ley hace que constituya un delito que las compañías se apropien de direcciones de Internet que contengan nombres registrados por otras compañías (cyber squatting)

cybersquatting present participle. The practice of obtaining and holding an Internet domain name that uses a company's registered trademark name. Also: cyber-squatting.
—cybersquat, v. Also: cyber-squat. —cybersquatter, n. Also: cyber-squatter.

http://www.wordspy.com/words/cybersquatting.asp

Ivannia Garcia
Local time: 06:59
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Leopoldo Gurman: =:)
1 hr
  -> Gracias Leopoldo!! =)

agree  Refugio
20 hrs
  -> Gracias, Ruth!! :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
this law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
Conforme esta ley la explotación de direcciones de Internet registradas configura un delito / o...


Explanation:
Esta ley tipifica como delito a la explotación de direcciones de internet ya registradas.

Mariela Barcelo
Local time: 09:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: Perdón, pero las direcciones no están registradas. El delito de "cybersquatting" constituye en registrar las que NO lo están, precisamente.
3 mins
  -> Gracias por la aclaración!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
this law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
esta ley prohibe a las empresas ocupar direcciones de Internet para impedir a la competencia


Explanation:
Me parece.

Marcelo González
Honduras
Local time: 06:59
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 78
1 corroborated select project
in this pair and field What is ProZ.com Project History(SM)?
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
this law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
Esta ley prohíbe (a las compañías) la explotación de las direcciones de Internet (URL)


Explanation:
No sé si "las compañías/empresas" sea redundante aquí.


http://www.freesearch.co.uk/dictionary/cybersquatting
cybersquatting

noun {U}

when someone pays to officially take a famous name as an Internet address, so that they can later sell it for a high price to the person or organization with that name
cybersquat

verb {I} -tt- cybersquatter

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2005-04-15 19:37:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"Cybersquatting\" no necesariamente es tomar una marca comercial y registrarla como un dominio en Internet, como, por ejemplo, registrar el dominio www.mcdonalds.com [si es que la corporación McDonald\'s no lo tiene registrado].

También se refiere a tomar un nombre famoso, como por ejemplo el de un actor, digamos, y registrarlo, para luego vender ese dominio al mejor postor. O sea, explotarlo. De eso se trata.

Ya ha ocurrido... recuerdo el caso de un cantante o actor famoso, alguien (un Fulano de Tal cualquiera) registró un dominio con el nombre del famoso y luego dicho famoso lo demandó o algo por el estilo. Creo que era Tom Jones o no sé...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2005-04-15 19:40:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

En vez de \"direcciones de Internet\", quizá sea mejor decir \"dominios\":

\"Esta ley prohíbe la explotación de dominios de Internet\"



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2005-04-15 19:47:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

www.jackpalance.com

Celebrity Name Cybersquatting

Entrepreneurial predators silently grope through the yet unkempt wilderness of cyberspace in quest of any opportunity to make quick money. A new boom known as \'cybersquatting\' is a prime example. A growing number of neer-do-wells register the personal names of famous people (as domain names) with the intent to sell them for enormous profits.

To counter this practice, the \'Anti-Cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act\' was enacted. Any person who registers a living celebrity\'s name with the proven intent to make money from the sale of that name, may be sued.

However, the Act comes up short. What happens if the one who registers the name bears the same name as the celebrity? What about the dead? And what about those stars who choose not to take legal action, or are not aware that vulnerable names are important to register? No protection!

Out of curiosity, when first aware of the Act, I began to search for unregistered TV and movie stars. I was appalled to find that such names as Jack Palance, Richard Widmark and Robert Duval - all alive and active at the time - had not been registered. Immediately, I registered their names just to keep some entrepreneurial parasite from taking advantage.

To date, I have captured about 15 names for safe keeping, some alive, most dead. The expense is not so great that it is even worth talking about. At no charge, I will be more than honored to transfer domain name ownership.

A person\'s name is important. Please help me find unregistered celebrity names - living or deceased - so that they can be registered (.com only) and kept in a safe haven until claimed by the ones who should rightfully hold them. Finders will be given credit for their find. Thank you!






http://www.ipnewsblog.com/article/17 u.s.c./fair use
Cheney\'s Domain Name Slip-Up
Submitted by Vinod Shankar on Wed, 10/06/2004 - 9:35pm.
Over on Factcheck.org, a \"nonpartisan, nonprofit, \'consumer advocate\' for voters.\" The website Cheney announced was actually pointed to an anti-Bush website, GeorgeSoros.com. There is a report here that Factcheck.com was dead during the debate. So was this an amazingly quick stab at cybersquatting by GeorgeSoros.com? If it was a bad faith attempt to cybersquat, then I\'d guess this could be a case of initial interest confusion. An interesting question, because I\'m not sure if is really bad faith. Cheney said a URL in a debate, but it wasn\'t one he\'s associated with. If that URL has no owner, isn\'t it free game? Even for an anti-Cheney message?






--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 40 mins (2005-04-15 20:00:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Un artículo muy interesante:

http://speakout.com/activism/issue_briefs/1263b-1.html

Should Cybersquatting be Treated as a Trademark Violation?

by John Barry
Thursday, April 27, 2000

In California, on August 23, the battle against cybersquatting took an important turn as Governor Gray Davis signed into a law a bill that makes it illegal to register Internet names of other people with \"bad faith\" intent. Under this bill, trademark protection is extended to names of celebrities (and the heirs of celebrities) which federal law did not cover earlier. Under this law, courts can order \"squatters\" to restore money that they have gained through this practice and pay $2,500 per incident.

On August 7, the family of rock star Jimi Hendrix won a case against the holder of the Internet address www.jimihendrix.com. The Geneva-based World Intellectual Court ruled that by using the guitar hero\'s name in the website, the owners of the domain name had violated copyright laws. The family owns the name Jimi Hendrix under common law. This is only one of several lawsuits pending in which celebrities - including Julia Roberts and Jethro Tull - have begun to sue to evict cybersquatters.

Many cybersquatters have been using domain names as a way of hijacking legitimate businesses, often by using their names in pornographic websites. Bargainbid.com was the domain name of an Internet start-up based in New York City. It presumably attracted people who were interested in buying computer-related goods through an auction over the Internet. But potential customers who left out the second \"a\" would log onto something different: \"We decided to get out of the auction business, but don\'t despair! Coming soon! Jungle Love and Down on the Farm! Featuring: All along the Hitching Post, Mississippi Sheep are Easy.\"

Hundreds of other high profile businesses have found that when people mispell their names, they wind up where they never intended to be: in pictures of people engaged in sex acts, and other pornographic images. This is all the work of cybersquatters: people who profit from the domain name which includes - or resembles - the name of a famous company or person. Some domain names can be purchased for about $35, registered on the World Wide Web. Those names can then be sold at a large profit to pornographic websites who want to attract new viewers to their websites, or to the nameholders themselves, who don\'t want to be associated with bondage gear. Dan Parisi of New Jersey, for instance, used the White House as a way of launching his infamous \"whitehouse.com\" pornographic website. Largely because of the name, his site gets 500,000 visits a month. Is this a legitimate way of doing business? While most agree that this cybersquatting is a shady route to riches, the legal grounds for prosecuting them is shaky. For the first time, names are being given trademark status and protection under the law. While many in California will welcome Governor Gray\'s bill (which passed unanimously), the legal implications are going to be sticky. Does this mean you can\'t have a web site with the name of an up-and-coming movie actor? Or does it mean that words like \"Madonna\" or \"Sting\" have become the exclusive property of the celebrities who picked them?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 42 mins (2005-04-15 20:02:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Cybersquatting = también llamado \"ciberocupación\". Y ya me callo :P


ponencia11 - [ Translate this page ]
... el combate contra prácticas aberrantes (cybersquatting también llamado domain
name grabbing, que en español ya se ha traducido por \"ciberocupación\"). ...
comunidad.derecho.org/congreso/ponencia26.html - 97k - Cached - Similar pages

Diccionario tecnico - [ Translate this page ]
... CYBERSQUATTING Es el término utilizado en Internet para referirse a la acción de
... También llamado \"farming\". Es el hecho de disponer de un servidor ...
www.fce.unl.edu.ar/ecommerce/diccionario.htm - 47k - Cached - Similar pages

Hipermarketing - Comercio Electrónico - [ Translate this page ]
... L a práctica del llamado \"cybersquatting\", o piratería de nombres de dominio va
... También incluye la apropiación de nombres sociales, slogans y frases ...
www.hipermarketing.com/nuevo 4/contenido/ e-business/comercio%20electronico/nivel3disputa.html - 14k - Cached - Similar pages

[DOC] Marcas y Nombres de Dominio
File Format: Microsoft Word 2000 - View as HTML
... así como también su utilización como plataforma comercial, ha generado la ...
originaron la práctica conocida como “cybersquatting”, consistente en el ...
www.camparaguay.com/descargar/usoabusivo.doc - Similar pages

[PDF] DOMINIOS: SISTEMAS DE NOMBRES Y REGISTROS DE NOMBRES 1 ...
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
... Cybersquatting: piratería cibernética.- ... También llamado anfitrión (host).
Es el ordenador que tiene el software y los datos (zone file), ...
www.ccee.edu.uy/ensenian/catderpu/material/dominio.PDF - Similar pages

[PDF] DEFENSA DE NOMBRES DE DOMINIO CIBEROCUPADOS José Ovidio Salgueiro ...
File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
... También llamado DNS por sus siglas en inglés (Domain Name System) y URL por
las siglas en ... “cybersquatting”, “ciberpiratería” o “ciberocupación”. ...
www.iberolatino.org.ar/download.php?select=23 - Similar pages




María Teresa Taylor Oliver
Panama
Local time: 07:59
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Excelente!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Martin Harvey: Muy interesante.
4 hrs
  -> Gracias, Martin

agree  Gabriela Rodriguez: Muy buena investigación. Buen fin de semana!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
6 hrs
  -> Gracias, Gaby :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

15 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
this law makes it a crime to have companies go ahead and “cybersquat”
esta ley prohibe a las empresas la usurpación de nombres de dominio


Explanation:
In Spain and at the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) "cybersquatting" is called "usurpación de nombres de dominio."

"La usurpación de nombres de dominio se ha convertido en un problema habitual para las empresas que deciden tener una identidad en Internet. Las compañías están buscando vías de resolución para este tipo de conflictos dentro y fuera de los tribunales.
El registro abusivo y de mala fe de un nombre de dominio en la red sin tener la titularidad de la marca –conocido como cybersquatting– es un mecanismo muy utilizado por ciberdelincuentes que aspiran a obtener un beneficio por la venta del nombre a la empresa titular. Muchas compañías de renombre se han encontrado con que algunos cybersquatters se les habían adelantado al registro como dominio de su marca o denominación social lo que, al menos, constituye una infracción de su derecho de marca.
http://www.expansiondirecto.com/tecnologia/legislacion/l1704...

For a WIPO arbitration panel decision on cybersquatting (in Spanish) see:
http://arbiter.wipo.i"nt/domains/decisions/html/2001/d2...



Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 14:59
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 430

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  María Teresa Taylor Oliver: Hola, Rebecca. No ha visto tu respuesta, me parece muy acertada la frase "usurpación de nombres de dominio". Voy a sugerirla para los glosarios. Saludos :)
3 days 11 hrs
  -> Gracias, la verdad es que las otras sugerencias (menos ciberocupación) describen bien lo que es cybersquatting, pero el término usado entre los especialistas de propiedad intelectual es, en efecto, "usurpación de nombres de dominio."
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