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qualified

English translation: combination of skills and/or certificates, diplomas

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:qualified
English translation: combination of skills and/or certificates, diplomas
Entered by: RHELLER
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16:13 Oct 22, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Medical - Accounting
English term or phrase: qualified
I search on Encarta and found two meaning for the word 'qualified'
1. officially eligible: having met a condition or requirement to become legally eligible for or entitled to a position or privilege
2. suitable or eligible to do something: with the necessary skills, qualities, or attributes to do a particular thing

Question: What is the meaing of the word Qualified in the following sentence ?
If you wish, the Pro Sentret can arrange for qualified interpreters if necessary.

Question: If someone ask: Are you a qualified translator?
What does he want to know about me?
1) graduated from the language school and obtained 'translator qualification'
2) having necessary skill and experience.
3) legally qualified by an institution in my country
4) Not enough information.
adda
a combination of skills and/or certificates/ diplomas
Explanation:
you are correct - it is a vague term and totally depends on what the employer (subjective) thinks is "qualified"

just give him everything you've got and hope that is enough :-)
Selected response from:

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 10:41
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +6a combination of skills and/or certificates/ diplomas
RHELLER
44 -- not enough information
Deborah Workman
4It depends
Empty Whiskey Glass


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
a combination of skills and/or certificates/ diplomas


Explanation:
you are correct - it is a vague term and totally depends on what the employer (subjective) thinks is "qualified"

just give him everything you've got and hope that is enough :-)

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 10:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  nlingua
5 mins
  -> merci :-)

agree  Derek Gill Franßen: That's all I do, I never really pay too much attention to what they think they want... ;-)
48 mins
  -> thanks Derek!

agree  Madeleine MacRae Klintebo
1 hr
  -> thanks Madeleine :-)

agree  humbird: Rita, you are quite right!
3 hrs
  -> thank you Susan!

agree  Java Cafe
13 hrs
  -> thanks Java Cafe :-)

agree  Asghar Bhatti
19 hrs
  -> thanks Asghar :-)
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21 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
It depends


Explanation:
Qualification may be country-specific. That is, in the country A a qualified translator is a translator who holds ABC degree. In the country B, a qualified translator may be something different.

Generally, a qualified translator must be items 1 to 3 of your list.
Youd' better check what the requirements for qualified translators in the country where Pro Sentret is located are.

Empty Whiskey Glass
Local time: 19:41
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
4 -- not enough information


Explanation:
In my experience with this kind of question, which is mostly in the United States, when anyone asks if someone is a qualified X, they are asking in a specific context (qualified in terms of what this company requires, in terms of what this government requires, in terms of what this project requires).

If the question is posed in a country where people are not permitted to work as translators without XYZ certification or licensing (I don't know for sure, but I have a vague feeling that there are some such countries), then the meaning is very specific (i.e., are you "licensed/authorized" to provide these services).

While I have been translating for years, I have been a freelance translator for less than a year, and have not looked into what it means to be "qualified" before now. What I've learned so far is that there appear to be no common standards and no universally required (and few universally recognized) certifying/authorizing/"licensing" bodies. Acceptable qualifications vary from job to job, but the usual things that seem to "qualify" a translator tend to include: target language=native tongue, subject-matter expertise, required software, country of residence, satisfactory performance on a test, good references, attractive price AND THEN academic degrees and certifications.

Deborah Workman
United States
Local time: 12:41
Native speaker of: English
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