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booking vs. reservations

English translation: either is acceptable, except for specalized useage, such as in accounting, though in general one 'books' a seat in the UK and 'm

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:booking vs. reservations
English translation:either is acceptable, except for specalized useage, such as in accounting, though in general one 'books' a seat in the UK and 'm
Entered by: Charlesp
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20:12 Dec 17, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Advertising / Public Relations
English term or phrase: booking vs. reservations
booking vs. reservations

Although "booking" is the commonly referred to term for what we in the U.S. refer to as "reservations," would it be wrong (i.e. would it not be used in the UK) to use the term "reservations" in a text that othewise would be British English?
Charlesp
Sweden
Local time: 17:10
either
Explanation:
The use of reservation rather than booking is does seem to be used widely in the UK within the tourism/hospitality industry.

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Note added at 9 mins (2005-12-17 20:22:01 GMT)
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Oops! Please excuse the errant 'is'!
Selected response from:

Lagom
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:10
Grading comment
Well that is what I thought, but having spent so much time in both places, I wanted professional confirmation.Either can be acceptable, except for specalized useage, such as in accounting, though in general one 'books' a seat in the UK and 'makes a reservation' in the US.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +6eitherLagom
5 +1only if not in accounting
Dave Calderhead


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
either


Explanation:
The use of reservation rather than booking is does seem to be used widely in the UK within the tourism/hospitality industry.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2005-12-17 20:22:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Oops! Please excuse the errant 'is'!

Lagom
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Well that is what I thought, but having spent so much time in both places, I wanted professional confirmation.Either can be acceptable, except for specalized useage, such as in accounting, though in general one 'books' a seat in the UK and 'makes a reservation' in the US.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tim Kynerd: As a native U.S. English speaker, I'm pretty sure that both terms are acceptable in the U.S. as well.
1 hr

agree  Yavor Dimitrov
9 hrs

agree  Cristina Chaplin
12 hrs

agree  Peter Shortall
14 hrs

agree  Dave Calderhead: provided not used in accounting for monies, assets or liabilities - my answer (:-{)>
18 hrs

agree  Rebecca Barath
1 day8 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
only if not in accounting


Explanation:
Fine, unless this is in accounting, where a booking is an entry of an expense or asset item, and reservation is a provision or earmarking of money for anticipated future liabilities or expenses

Dave Calderhead
Netherlands
Local time: 17:10
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christine Andersen
17 hrs
  -> Thanks, Christine. (:-{)>
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Changes made by editors
Dec 18, 2005 - Changes made by Charlesp:
Language pairSwedish to English » English


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