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nut-size fruit

English translation: young fruit

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15:12 Mar 20, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Science - Agriculture / fertilizers
English term or phrase: nut-size fruit
I need to find the English technical term that refers to a newly developed fruit (in my case apples), still the size of a nut. I proposed fruitlet, but client said "it is a different thing"

can anybody help?
thanks!
Elena Ghetti
Italy
Local time: 22:57
English translation:young fruit
Explanation:
...as opposed to "mature fruit". Assuming you're talking about regular-sized fruit in the early stages of development I'd be tempted to stick with something fairly self-explanatory. I'm not sure whether this is a technical term but there are some good-looking refs out there for it. Or how about "the developing fruit"?
Selected response from:

Amy Williams
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:57
Grading comment
many thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +9young fruit
Amy Williams
4 +3young/baby fruit
R-i-c-h-a-r-d
4 +1fruitlet or young fruit, dep. on nut size
Rachel Fell
3miniature/dwarf
Mark Nathan
2 +1immature fruit
Melanie Nassar


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
young/baby fruit


Explanation:
Not very technical, sorry, but that is the terminology I would use.

R-i-c-h-a-r-d
Brazil
Local time: 17:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter
2 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Joe L
14 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot Joe

agree  Amy Williams
20 hrs
  -> Cheers Amy
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
young fruit


Explanation:
...as opposed to "mature fruit". Assuming you're talking about regular-sized fruit in the early stages of development I'd be tempted to stick with something fairly self-explanatory. I'm not sure whether this is a technical term but there are some good-looking refs out there for it. Or how about "the developing fruit"?

Amy Williams
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:57
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
many thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alison Jenner: "young fruit" was my thought, too.
6 mins
  -> thanks, Alison

agree  writeaway: yes-especially after the explanation! young fruit stage
1 hr

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
1 hr

agree  Will Matter
2 hrs

agree  Elena Aleksandrova
4 hrs

agree  Rachel Fell: probably this size
7 hrs

agree  R-i-c-h-a-r-d: I agree!!
7 hrs

agree  Joe L
14 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
6 days
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
immature fruit


Explanation:
they are sometimes found in conjunction
immature fruit (fruitlet)
I also looked up fruitlet and found "diminutive fruit, especially one that is part of a multiple fruit"
I take it newly "developed" means just starting to grow and not genetically modified.
Of course, immature apples can range from nut-sized to quite a bit larger; I don't know of different terms to designate the stages of growth.

Melanie Nassar
United States
Local time: 23:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter
2 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
fruitlet or young fruit, dep. on nut size


Explanation:
When young fruitlets (<10 mm) were abundant,
most larvae established feeding sites in clusters of
fruit, leaves, and flower remnants. During the
young fruit stage (<40 mm), most larvae fed under
the calyces of individual fruit. When only mature
fruit were available,

http://www.ricecrc.org/reader/hort-coastal/fruitgrowerssumme...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 hrs (2007-03-21 06:56:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

pics. here of fruitlets - they're the very small ones:
http://web1.msue.msu.edu/berrien/hort/budstage/apple/apple.h...

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Joe L: With the "young fruit" part of your answer; "fruitlet" appears to be something different: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fruitlet
6 hrs
  -> Yes, thank you Joe L:)
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
miniature/dwarf


Explanation:
are certainly used

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2007-03-24 21:11:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

following your note, change that to developing fruit:

http://www.plant-biology.net/bsa/misc/mcintosh/mcinto18.html

Mark Nathan
France
Local time: 22:57
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Amy Williams: "miniature" or "dwarf" denotes the size of the mature miniature or dwarf variety, not the developing fruit, though
8 mins
  -> I understood to be fully developed but (still) the size of a nut.
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