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outro

English translation: [means the opposite of an intro(duction) --- a conclusion, epilogue, closing remarks etc., depending on context]

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:outro
English translation:[means the opposite of an intro(duction) --- a conclusion, epilogue, closing remarks etc., depending on context]
Entered by: Tony M
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
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04:49 Mar 29, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Architecture
English term or phrase: outro
This word appears as a title at the end of an article(written in Italian)which describes the career of a certain Italian architect.It's not, as far as I am aware, an Italian term and so must be borrowed from English. If so, what on earth does it mean? The only references I have been able to find are to music. Does it mean "finale"? Or perhaps "conclusion"? Can anyone help and suggest an alternative phrase?

Thanks in advance,

Amanda.
manducci
Local time: 23:50
conclusion
Explanation:
Yes, it's a commonly used made-up English term, by analogy with 'intro', and simply meaning an end-piece.

I think 'Conclusion' is a nice term to use in a book context

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Note added at 2 hrs 20 mins (2004-03-29 07:09:17 GMT)
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If you think of intro/outro as a complementary pair, then I think Foreword/Conclusion works well
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 23:50
Grading comment
In the end I went for "closing remarks" as this suited my context better. Your answer however, was the most suitable of the answers suggested. Thanks for your help and a thank you also to the others who offered alternatives.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +5coda / end section
Todd Field
3 +2conclusion
Tony M
4"other" in Portuguese
Maria Karra
3summing up, summary
Christine Andersen
2 -1outré- "eccentric"
Gareth McMillan


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
outro (urgent!!)
"other" in Portuguese


Explanation:
Hi. How exactly does it show up in your text? All by itself at the end? The only thing that comes to mind is the Portuguese word "outro", which means "other", but it doesn't make much sense if it's all by itself, and not in a sentence.

Maria Karra
United States
Local time: 17:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GreekGreek

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
23 mins

disagree  Tony M: No, this is a perfectly valid English word in its own right...
2 hrs
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
outro (urgent!!)
coda / end section


Explanation:
In musical terminology, an "outro" is a more colloquial way of saying "coda", which is the opposite of the intro.

In other words, it is simply the "end section" of the piece. An outro is often used to describe the last part of a piece of music as it fades away into silence.

Hope this helps and good luck.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2004-03-29 05:01:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A couple of online glosssary references for you:

http://www.robertchristgau.com/xg/bk-cg80/glossary.php

http://www.tki.org.nz/r/arts/music/glossary_e.php

Todd Field
United States
Local time: 15:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
18 mins

agree  Mario Marcolin
1 hr

agree  Tony M
2 hrs

agree  mrrobkoc
2 hrs

agree  chopra_2002
7 hrs

neutral  klausrose: Coda? Is that not just a name for the music industry's Artist-payment-system? Well as I am also a musician, mostly studio editor, the only time I heard Outro used was when we plan how a song ends (fades out) etc ;-) Gosh 2120 days? BUG rapport!
2120 days
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -1
outro (urgent!!)
outré- "eccentric"


Explanation:
This is a seldom used but legitimate word in English and is adopted from French. It may be that both this word and the Italian are derived from Latin, but I can't find my Latin Dico.

Anyhow the word outré means something or some behavior which is outside the norms of convention ar correctness- in other words, "eccentric". It may fit your context if the architect was somewhat "original´" in his thinking.

Hope this may help- my knowledge of Italian is limited to music notation, but I don't think outra in this sense fits unless your piece is about the last or closing phase of your architects work.

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Note added at 1 hr 20 mins (2004-03-29 06:10:01 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

ar = or....sorry.

Gareth McMillan
Local time: 23:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: We shouldn't ASSUME a typo, especially when it takes us farther away from Asker's context... * * * Sorry, but I naturally took that as the implication of your 'outro > outré'
1 hr
  -> Just where are you coming from, Dusty? I didn't say it was a typo.
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
outro (urgent!!)
conclusion


Explanation:
Yes, it's a commonly used made-up English term, by analogy with 'intro', and simply meaning an end-piece.

I think 'Conclusion' is a nice term to use in a book context

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs 20 mins (2004-03-29 07:09:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

If you think of intro/outro as a complementary pair, then I think Foreword/Conclusion works well

Tony M
France
Local time: 23:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
In the end I went for "closing remarks" as this suited my context better. Your answer however, was the most suitable of the answers suggested. Thanks for your help and a thank you also to the others who offered alternatives.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  vixen
25 mins
  -> Thanks, Vixen!

agree  EKM: Conclusion should work nicely - but the context is sparse - depending on the nature of the last section, maybe "epilogue" could work as well.
52 mins
  -> Thanks, Mårten! I like your 'epilogue' too...
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
summing up, summary


Explanation:
It's not as snappy as 'outro' but it is a sort of rounding off, or opposite to an intro(duction) that might fit.

Christine Andersen
Denmark
Local time: 23:50
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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