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new life for a school rule

English translation: The "time sequence rule" does not apply here.

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04:37 Dec 1, 2001
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: new life for a school rule
You all know the rule of sequence of tences, which is always taught at school and always seems quite bewildering, what I want to ask is what is the sequence of tences with reference to the future, as in:


A woman is thinking about her husband, who is supposed to have a mistress:
I know what he is going to tell me, when he comes.
He will tell me, he (??? had too much work/ had had too much work/ has to much work/ will have too much work/ will have had too much work)...

I am at a loss, could you help me please... try to find a good reference in a modern Grammar book ...
Rostislau Golod
Local time: 12:51
English translation:The "time sequence rule" does not apply here.
Explanation:
The "time sequence rule" applies when the reporting phrase ("he said") is in the past tense. In that case, the content of the "reported speech" is regressed further into the past. Examples:

Direct speech: He said, "I have too much work."
Reported (indirect) speech: He said he had too much work.

Direct speech: He said, "I had too much work."
Reported speech: He said he had had too much work.

In the example that you provided, however, the reporting phrase is in the future ("He will tell me"), so there is no time regression involved here. Therefore the direct and indirect forms will be the same.

If the husband is referring to his coming home late that evening, then he will be using the past tense to begin with. He will say something like, "I had too much work." His wife, anticipating his statement, would say, "He will tell me he had too much work." Since there is no regression, the tense does not change to past perfect.

Fuad
Selected response from:

Fuad Yahya
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Summary of answers provided
4 +2The "time sequence rule" does not apply here.Fuad Yahya
5He had too much work / He has too much work
Monica Colangelo
5"he had too much work."John Guchemand
4He will tell me he had too much work.amarilis


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
He will tell me he had too much work.


Explanation:
I'd say "... he had too much work." since that would be his excuse for having an affair at that time.

I found quite a lot of good English grammar books at www.amazon.com. I think you might like to check them out.

Good luck and HTH.



    EFL teacher
amarilis
Thailand
Local time: 16:51
Native speaker of: Native in ThaiThai, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 10
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
"he had too much work."


Explanation:
What this is is reported speech. It is a very strange thing in the English language, but any time you talk about something that someone said, you put it in the past. Native English speakers do this automatically, but when you think about it, it doesn't seem to make a lot of sense.

Examples:

"I had too much food."

He told me that he had had too much food.

or

"I have too much work"

He said that he had too much work.

or


"I will go to school."

She said that she would go to school.

*****Just look in a good English grammar book under Reported Speech

John Guchemand
United States
Local time: 04:51
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
The "time sequence rule" does not apply here.


Explanation:
The "time sequence rule" applies when the reporting phrase ("he said") is in the past tense. In that case, the content of the "reported speech" is regressed further into the past. Examples:

Direct speech: He said, "I have too much work."
Reported (indirect) speech: He said he had too much work.

Direct speech: He said, "I had too much work."
Reported speech: He said he had had too much work.

In the example that you provided, however, the reporting phrase is in the future ("He will tell me"), so there is no time regression involved here. Therefore the direct and indirect forms will be the same.

If the husband is referring to his coming home late that evening, then he will be using the past tense to begin with. He will say something like, "I had too much work." His wife, anticipating his statement, would say, "He will tell me he had too much work." Since there is no regression, the tense does not change to past perfect.

Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 893
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  amarilis: i like your explanation:).. it's thorough :)
2 hrs

agree  Milana_R
5 hrs
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16 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
He had too much work / He has too much work


Explanation:
I agree with my colleagues in regard of the first option. However, that means he is explaining today´s reason for being late only.
If the lady says: "He will tell me he has too much work" it would mean that these days he is loaded with work (yesterday, the day before, today and tomorrow as well)
Do you get it? Try translating it into your own language and see how it sounds using the present, would it mean the same?

Monica Colangelo
Argentina
Local time: 06:51
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 63
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