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gloir

English translation: glory

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:gloir
English translation:glory
Entered by: Irina Glozman
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22:20 May 29, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: gloir
Anonymous. 17th Cent.

384. Cradle Song

O MY deir hert, young Jesus sweit,
Prepare thy creddil in my spreit,
And I sall rock thee in my hert
And never mair from thee depart.

But I sall praise thee evermoir 5
With sangis sweit unto thy gloir;
The knees of my hert sall I bow,
And sing that richt Balulalow!
Irina Glozman
United States
Local time: 10:18
glory
Explanation:
The word "glory" in Old English.

Hope this helps!
Selected response from:

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 13:18
Grading comment
Thanks to all!

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +9glory
Bill Greendyk
5 +6gloir here means glory, but comes via Anglo-Norman, not Old English.cathell


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
glory


Explanation:
The word "glory" in Old English.

Hope this helps!

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 13:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 24
Grading comment
Thanks to all!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maya Jurt: From the French "gloire" - glory, yes.
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Maya!

agree  hmwright13
15 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Mads Grøftehauge: I think it's from Irish, though. Middle English (13th to 15th C) spelling is 'glorie'. Cp. "Mise Eire, mor mo gloir" (I am Ireland, great is my glory)
21 mins
  -> I think you must be right. This doesn´t look like Middle or Old English either.

agree  John Kinory: Err ... it's from Latin, in fact. Simply guessing is liable to end in tears! :-)
30 mins

agree  xxxOso: ¶:^)
1 hr

agree  Angela C.
2 hrs

agree  Piotr Kurek
6 hrs

agree  Patricia Lutteral: yes, but I think Mads's right, it's Middle English (Old English had no Latin influence, it's the language before the Normans) :-))
8 hrs

agree  Chinoise
11 days
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
gloir here means glory, but comes via Anglo-Norman, not Old English.


Explanation:
The text is part of a late medieval/early modern Scottish carol

cathell

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Kinory: As you agree with WG's interpret', netiquette has it that you press Agree under his answer rather than post the same answer again. In any case, you are not meant to put a whole explanation on the 1st line, only the equiv' term: comments can go under WG's
1 hr

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: Hi John, I don't mean to be awkward, but I didn't realise (either?) that the "rules" were so clear-cut.Is this not a legimitate reply? It's definitely not the first of its kind. :-)
3 hrs

agree  Kim Metzger: Dear Cathell, thanks for contributing additional info. - English (monolingual) moderator.
6 hrs

agree  Roomy Naqvy: Dear Cathell, I agree with you. [Mr. Kinory, netiquette also demands that you don't come down too heavily like that!!!]
7 hrs

agree  Patricia Lutteral: yes :-))
8 hrs

agree  Margaret Lagoyianni
8 hrs

agree  flaviofbg: Interestind addendum, we ALL love etimology :)
8 hrs

agree  Henry Dotterer: Yes, please do put just the answer on the first line. makes it easier for a computer to work with it. Thanks!
23 hrs
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