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you guys

English translation: you folks, you peeps, etc.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:you guys
English translation:you folks, you peeps, etc.
Entered by: Chinoise
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

13:55 Aug 18, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: you guys
Could you please tell me whether you can address a group of men and women "you guys"?
sara
Yes.
Explanation:
Yes.

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Note added at 2002-08-18 14:01:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

We often say \"you guys\" in colloquial English in Canada and the United States to refer to a group of people( men or women or both). Anyway, it\'s mostly used in oral English.(informal)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-18 14:13:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PS. This expression is colloquial, casual, and informal. Normally, it is the kind of conversation among familiar friends, schoolmates, colleagues, etc.

HTH
Selected response from:

Chinoise
Local time: 18:25
Grading comment
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +22Yes.
Chinoise
4 +11Yes, if you're on very friendly terms with them
Kim Metzger
4 +6Yes, but much less common in UK English
Jack Doughty
5 +2Not if it includes feminists... or even women!xxxLia Fail
5absolutely
Marian Greenfield
5yes, you can...
Eva Blanar


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +22
Yes.


Explanation:
Yes.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-18 14:01:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

We often say \"you guys\" in colloquial English in Canada and the United States to refer to a group of people( men or women or both). Anyway, it\'s mostly used in oral English.(informal)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-18 14:13:02 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

PS. This expression is colloquial, casual, and informal. Normally, it is the kind of conversation among familiar friends, schoolmates, colleagues, etc.

HTH

Chinoise
Local time: 18:25
Native speaker of: Native in ChineseChinese
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  CLS Lexi-tech
5 mins
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  luskie
6 mins
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Andrea Bullrich
6 mins
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Antonella Andreella
30 mins
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Rafa Lombardino
34 mins
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  GertV
41 mins
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Libero_Lang_Lab
47 mins
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  xxxsergey: yep, any person, male or female: Come on, you guys!
57 mins
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Chris Rowson: Also in England, where international expressions are accepted.
1 hr
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Midori Wilson
1 hr
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Abdul Mukhid
1 hr
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  jerrie
1 hr
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Denise Costa
2 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Antonio Camangi
3 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Ildiko Santana: you guys / folks / peeps -- all very common
3 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Gabriela Tenenbaum: absolutely #:)
4 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  cillegio
6 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Herman Vilella: I'd be very careful. Ask
8 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Sue Crocker
10 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  RHELLER: acceptable in familiar situations
15 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  xxxR.J.Chadwick: Yes, you can if you want to -- and there are alternatives
18 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!

agree  Yelena.
1 day2 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
Yes, if you're on very friendly terms with them


Explanation:
If you address a group of people (including both men and women or either gender separately) as "you guys" you are using an informal form of address. It would be very appropriate if you know them well and are on friendly terms with them.
Otherwise you would you the second person plural "you."
Dear Ladies and Gentlemen, you asked me if I would ....

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 16:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Piotr Kurek
0 min

agree  CLS Lexi-tech
2 mins

agree  Andrea Bullrich
4 mins

agree  Anette Herbert
10 mins

agree  Maria-Jose Pastor
16 mins

agree  Antonella Andreella
28 mins

neutral  Chris Rowson: In a "Ladies and Gentlemen" situation, it is of course out of the question, but I am used to it in work contexts, even where we dont know each other well. Course its all the fault of you guys over there :-)
1 hr

neutral  Ildiko Santana: I agree that it is an informal form, but not necessarily between guys on friendly terms.
3 hrs

agree  Gabriela Tenenbaum: Yes #:)
5 hrs

agree  GaryG: Exactly, although one of a group of women I knew well once got bent out of shape, taking it as if I'd taken them for men.
6 hrs

agree  Sue Crocker
10 hrs

neutral  John Kinory: Agree with Chris and Ildiko. And of course, in the UK women would be entitled to take it in the spirit suggested by Gary's group of women.
11 hrs

agree  Fuad Yahya: I once addressed a team of oncologists in Houston, Texas, as "you guys," and the response was less than warm. Gender was not even an issue; formality was.
11 hrs

agree  Libero_Lang_Lab: yeah, but that's oncologists all over... how many times have i wasted a good joke on a cancer surgeon
12 hrs
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
absolutely


Explanation:
<you guys> is one of my <New Jerseyisms>. It's the New Jersey (and somewhat Northeastern) equivalent of the Southern <you all>, which I sometimes use when I don't want to sound quite as slangy.

msg


Marian Greenfield
Local time: 17:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 732

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ildiko Santana: In the US it is commonly used by folks from virtually every state, not just NJ (though I've not met anyone from Alaska yet..).
2 hrs
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
yes, you can...


Explanation:
... if you are close friends OR if they are subordinated to you and you don't want to be particularly polite. (I personally hate to be addressed this way 'you guys', 'you folks'.)

Eva Blanar
Hungary
Local time: 23:25
Native speaker of: Hungarian
PRO pts in pair: 14

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ildiko Santana: They don't have to be close friends or subordinated to you. You shouldn't get offended, Eva, when you're addressed this way, there's no insult behind it - just like no one really wants to know how you are doing when they say "How're ya doin' "... ;-)
2 hrs
  -> Okay, okay, I know, I still just hate it!

neutral  John Kinory: I detest it, too. That's precisely why you shouldn't use it to people subordinate to you: they could rightly be offended.
10 hrs
  -> I'm glad you agree with me: thanks!
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41 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
Yes, but much less common in UK English


Explanation:
In UK English, "guy" was normally taken to be male, and "gal" female (though both these are of US English origin).
But due to the influence of US films, TV shoes etc., "guys" in the US sense is certainly now understood here, and even used in the same way sometimes.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-19 16:22:31 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For shoes read shows.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4130

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eva Blanar
1 min

neutral  Libero_Lang_Lab: While it is very much an Americanism, I would say that it is very common nowadays in the UK
8 mins
  -> You may be right, I don't move in the circles that would use it.

agree  Chris Rowson: My experience is the same as Dan´s. (I do move in those circles. :-)
23 mins
  -> Alas, another linguistic battle lost! OK, you must both be right and it is more common than I thought. But it has only become so fairly recently.

agree  Irene Chernenko: I have had a hostess in a resort restaurant (in Australia) address me and my companion as "you guys, your table is ready", and I was not impressed!
1 hr
  -> It would certainly sound rude and over-familiar to me, but maybe this is not so in Australia.

agree  John Kinory: I don't believe this battle is lost at all. Some people want to be like Americans at all costs (no offence intended - my wife is American), and use it. But I do move in some circles that use very contemporary slangy BE and they wouldn't dream of using it.
10 hrs
  -> Thank you.

agree  xxxKanta Rawat
15 hrs

agree  Yelena.
1 day1 hr
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Not if it includes feminists... or even women!


Explanation:
'guys' by implication is male.

Theoretically speaking, I would object, as I'm not a guy. It's like lumping a class of 20 kids in Spain under 'niño' even though only one is a 'boy'. How ridiculous! But I'll accept that - to a point - in the Spanish langauge. But why accept it in English????

That's a personal opinion, also translators - professionally speaking - should not transmit bias (see Pter Newmark on the subject)

xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 23:25
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 86

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxR.J.Chadwick: Would you accept "you people" as an alternative?
5 hrs

agree  John Kinory: Spot on.
15 hrs
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