KudoZ home » English » Art/Literary

Help with tracking down a Keats poem

English translation: Keat's sonnet "On the Sea"

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Help with tracking down a Keats poem
English translation:Keat's sonnet "On the Sea"
Entered by: Berni Armstrong
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

08:40 Jan 27, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / Keats poem?
English term or phrase: Help with tracking down a Keats poem
Hi there,

I am translating a text from Spanish and it contains a quote from Keats that I do not recognise.

Of course it would be ridiculous for me to translate this into my version when English readers would understand the original.

However, I have tried without success to find it (Bartleby etc) and am now wondering if:

a) The Spanish translation was so far off the mark that my attempt to "re-translate" in search of the original is doomed to failure.

or

b) It is not by Keats at all.

ANYWAY - here is the "re-translated" bit - almost word for word from the Spanish translation:

"John Keats sang before the sea:

You who have weary and painful eyes,
Recapture your joy before the immensity of the sea;
You who have ears deafened by the noise,
Sit in an old cavern and mediate."

Does this ring any bells with anyone?

Thanks, in advance, for your help...

Berni
Berni Armstrong
Spain
Local time: 04:39
Keat's sonnet "On the Sea"
Explanation:
This is the last four lines of the sonnet which begins "It keeps eternal whisperings around Desolate shores ...

and goes on:

Oh ye! whose ears are dinn'd with uproar rude,
Or fed too much with cloying melody -
Sit ye near some old Cavern's Mouth, and brood
Until ye start, as if the sea-nymphys quir'd!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-27 08:58:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For reference: the whole sonnet

It keeps eternal whisperings around
Desolate shores, and with its mighty swell
Gluts twice ten thousand Caverns, till the spell
Of Hecate leaves them their old shadowy sound.
Often \'tis in such gentle temper found,
That scarcely will the very smallest shell
Be mov\'d for days from where it sometime fell,
When last the winds of Heaven were unbound.
Oh ye! who have your eye-balls vex\'d and tir\'d,
Feast them upon the wideness of the Sea;
Oh ye! whose ears are dinn\'d with uproar rude,
Or fed too much with cloying melody -
Sit ye near some old Cavern\'s Mouth, and brood
Until ye start, as if the sea-nymphs quir\'d!
Selected response from:

Armorel Young
Local time: 03:39
Grading comment
Oh Armorel!
Thou hast savéd my very bacon!

Isn't this Kudoz thing greeeeeaaaat!

Thank you so much,

Berni
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5Keat's sonnet "On the Sea"
Armorel Young


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Keat's sonnet "On the Sea"


Explanation:
This is the last four lines of the sonnet which begins "It keeps eternal whisperings around Desolate shores ...

and goes on:

Oh ye! whose ears are dinn'd with uproar rude,
Or fed too much with cloying melody -
Sit ye near some old Cavern's Mouth, and brood
Until ye start, as if the sea-nymphys quir'd!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-27 08:58:18 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

For reference: the whole sonnet

It keeps eternal whisperings around
Desolate shores, and with its mighty swell
Gluts twice ten thousand Caverns, till the spell
Of Hecate leaves them their old shadowy sound.
Often \'tis in such gentle temper found,
That scarcely will the very smallest shell
Be mov\'d for days from where it sometime fell,
When last the winds of Heaven were unbound.
Oh ye! who have your eye-balls vex\'d and tir\'d,
Feast them upon the wideness of the Sea;
Oh ye! whose ears are dinn\'d with uproar rude,
Or fed too much with cloying melody -
Sit ye near some old Cavern\'s Mouth, and brood
Until ye start, as if the sea-nymphs quir\'d!

Armorel Young
Local time: 03:39
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 601
Grading comment
Oh Armorel!
Thou hast savéd my very bacon!

Isn't this Kudoz thing greeeeeaaaat!

Thank you so much,

Berni
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search