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dead thick

English translation: utterly stupid

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:dead thick
English translation:utterly stupid
Entered by: jerrie
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19:51 Nov 10, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: dead thick
Michael Parkinson: It was interesting actually what Brian Epstein who played a huge part in your career, what he said about you. You quoted in the book he said he told the press he described you as being an untutored girl from a lowly part of Liverpool and a working class family. I mean you quoted affectionately but it seemed kind of patronising when you read it on the page. I mean he was a bit supercilious wasn’t he Brian.

Cilla Black: No…no…no I won’t have a word said about Brian Epstein. You’ve got to remember that times have changed, you know what is totally un-PC today…I mean I was quite proud of the fact that I had done this against all odds.

Michael Parkinson: Well you should have been but to sort of say that I just thought rather strange and when I read it it kind of came off the page at me and I thought well that’s…

Cilla Black: Mike I was nineteen, I was dead thick and he had the money.
lim0nka
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:17
utterly stupid
Explanation:
totally dense
mentally challenged

dead - completely
thick - thick as two short planks (not very clever!)

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Note added at 2003-11-10 19:58:03 (GMT)
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\"untutored girl from a lowly part of Liverpool\"
In other words uneducated from working class area (total un PC thing to say nowadays)...
or as Cilla says: dead thick!
Selected response from:

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:17
Grading comment
Thank you very much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +13utterly stupid
jerrie
5 +1absolutely obtuse
Valentín Hernández Lima
5stupid v naiveGordon Darroch
4daft
Lisa Lloyd
4 -1naivenyamuk


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +13
utterly stupid


Explanation:
totally dense
mentally challenged

dead - completely
thick - thick as two short planks (not very clever!)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-11-10 19:58:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"untutored girl from a lowly part of Liverpool\"
In other words uneducated from working class area (total un PC thing to say nowadays)...
or as Cilla says: dead thick!

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773
Grading comment
Thank you very much!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn
1 min

agree  john mason: Yes, but because she hadn't been 'properly' educated.
4 mins

agree  Amy Williams: yes, and 'dead' very liverpudlian.
6 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Armorel Young: yes, thick means dense or stupid, it's not the same as naive
20 mins

agree  Gordon Darroch
24 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  vixen
34 mins

agree  AngieD
47 mins

agree  David Knowles
52 mins

agree  xxxIanW
1 hr

agree  DGK T-I
1 hr

agree  Refugio
1 hr

agree  Charlie Bavington
1 hr

agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
absolutely obtuse


Explanation:
That is, dull or slow of mind or apprehension. The adverb "dead" is just an intensifier used in this case with the meaning of "to the last degree", as in "dead ripe" or "dead-tired" or "dead certain" (MWU).

Cheerio,

V

Valentín Hernández Lima
Spain
Local time: 22:17
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio
2 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
daft


Explanation:
is another term liverpuddlian Cilla might have chosen to describe her stupidity :o)

Tieland Here We Come!
... For Christ’s sake, if they’re daft enough to give the stuff away, what do they ... I
got chatting with a Mickey Mouser [Liverpuddlian] who was on our flight. ...
www.bahtbus.com/articles/readers/ bj-tielandherewecome.html

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Note added at 2 hrs 51 mins (2003-11-10 22:43:42 GMT)
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daft - stupid, as in \'as daft as a dormouse\'
from \"the beginner\'s guide to yorkshire\"

http://www.yorkshire-ess.org.uk/beginners_guide.html



Lisa Lloyd
Local time: 22:17
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Refugio: daft is a little different, more like crazy
59 mins
  -> not where I live (northern England) + please see ref above
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1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
naive


Explanation:
naive, un-experienced, a green horn.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 hrs 39 mins (2003-11-11 01:30:48 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

synonym vs meaning :

Its all very good and well to define an idiomatic expression with another idiomatic expression, but given the fact that the person who asked the question does not claim to be a native speaker, their needs would be more justly served by using the most generic of terminology. In that way one never has to assume that they \"got it.\"

\"utterly stupid\" is an un-mistakable synonym for \"dead thick.\" However does that answer the question, what did Cilla mean by \"dead thick\" ? I don\'t think so.

The question was framed in quite a bit of context. We have some one reflecting on a relationship, the beginnings of a career, and they mentioned their age. The interviewer talks about her having been unrefined. Perhaps I\'m being utterly stupid, but when I read all that it seems pretty clear that she is talking about her inexperience.


nyamuk
United States
Local time: 15:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 58

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn
2 mins

disagree  Gordon Darroch: "thick" means stupid, she's being self-deprecating
24 mins
  -> Sure I know what daft and thick mean, but when its preceeded by ..I was nineteen.. I think its fair to say she was, dumb, daft, thick, clueless at her trade, i.e. inexperienced or naive.

disagree  Refugio: naive is pc, dead thick is un-pc
1 hr
  -> notes above
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14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
stupid v naive


Explanation:
There's no conflict between synonym and meaning here - the problem with "naive" is it takes away the flavour of Cilla's comments. "I was dead thick" is a remark deliberately calculated to put herself down - it's a common trick used by British celebrities to ingratiate themselves with the audience. "I was naive" would have had quite a different tone, leaning more towards self-pity. So despite a very eloquent defence, nyamuk is wrong. I'm tempted to put this down to a conflict between Americans and the concept of irony, but that would just be naive... or stupid.

Gordon Darroch
Local time: 22:17
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 16
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