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goodbye to all that

English translation: farewell to all those things

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:goodbye to all that
English translation:farewell to all those things
Entered by: Kim Metzger
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16:26 Dec 15, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: goodbye to all that
Is this an idiom? I often see it used as a title for articles or songs, does it mean something like "and that's that", or similar? T.I.A.
A Mioni
Italy
Local time: 05:07
it means "farewell to all those things"
Explanation:
The person who uses this phrase has usually been talking about something very specific and ends by saying "but it's goodbye to all that" meaning that all that is now past, behind him, finished. It's all over, in the past. Maybe he is referring to his youth, maybe to recent experiences, but always in the past
Selected response from:

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 05:07
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3Explanation
Kim Metzger
5It's also a famous book by Robert GravesPippin Michelli
3 +2it means "farewell to all those things"xxxCMJ_Trans
5good riddanceSally van der Graaff


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
good riddance


Explanation:
Depending on the context, this could be the meaning. This would have a rather bitter or negative tone.

Sally van der Graaff
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Gordon Darroch: I feel it tends to be more upbeat - closer to "it's all water under the bridge"
2 mins
  -> Yes, I think you

neutral  Laurel Porter: depending on the context, I could possibly see this - but "you can kiss that all goodbye" is more in that vein
15 mins
  -> Yes, I think you're right. And, Gordon, I wanted to type the same thing above, but unfortunately hit the enter key instead of the apostrophe key! ;)
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Explanation


Explanation:
I don't think it can be classified as an idiom. The phrase means something like "I've closed the book on it. It's something that happened in the past and I am moving on."
It's also the title of the wonderful autobiography of Robert Graves, about his experiences in the trenches during WW1 in France.


    Reference: http://www.poetry-reviews.com/GoodBye_to_All_That_An_Autobio...
Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 22:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Christopher Crockett: Yes, the phrase is firmly linked to Graves, in the mind of any literate anglophone.
17 mins

agree  Sally van der Graaff
24 mins

agree  Chris Rowson: In a British context the phrase is inextricably linked with Graves.
1 hr
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
it means "farewell to all those things"


Explanation:
The person who uses this phrase has usually been talking about something very specific and ends by saying "but it's goodbye to all that" meaning that all that is now past, behind him, finished. It's all over, in the past. Maybe he is referring to his youth, maybe to recent experiences, but always in the past

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 05:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 376

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Laurel Porter: congrats - but I see Anna chose to translate this as "water under the bridge", essentially, and that loses the "bidding farewell" aspect of the phrase, which is relevant when it's the title of a biography, e.g....
11 mins

agree  Sally van der Graaff
18 mins
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
It's also a famous book by Robert Graves


Explanation:
His memoires of WWI. Someone using this idiom *might* therefore be deliberately bringing it to mind. Didn't it also have something to do with the loss of social values and norms caused by that war. The connotations would seem to be important here.

Pippin Michelli
Local time: 22:07
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 19
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