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she had a moment

English translation: she was in a bad mood

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07:34 Dec 17, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: she had a moment
Michael Parkinson: You have not been out with Meg Ryan have you?
Rod Stewart: Jesus what a way to start off a programme.
Michael Parkinson: No, I just wondered, no…
Rod Stewart: Well if I had I wouldn't tell you.
Michael Parkinson: No but… I just want to know if you did what you talked about?
Rod Stewart: She, she had… she had a moment did she?

Earlier on the show Parky said "We all have to have one failure. Mine was Meg Ryan." (He met her a week ago and it wasn't his best interview as Meg Ryan wasn't too talkative.)
lim0nka
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:23
English translation:she was in a bad mood
Explanation:
This is my no means clear, but I think it means that she was in a bad mood, which would explain why she wasn't "too talkative".

I remember reading about Elton John and what his band and entourage called his "Little Moments", i.e. when he threw a tantrum. I'll see if I can find more concrete evidence to back this up.

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Note added at 45 mins (2003-12-17 08:20:00 GMT)
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I couldn\'t find any further evidence without looking through the zillions of hits for \"had/have a moment\", but I think the native speaker comments below are evidence enough.
Selected response from:

xxxIanW
Local time: 18:23
Grading comment
Thank you very much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +9she was in a bad moodxxxIanW
4 +4"funny five minutes"
jerrie
4 +3intense emotional experienceGordon Darroch
3 +2agreeing with gordonmbc
3 +1You're implying she (actually) had a moment (to spare to talk to me)?
chica nueva
4she was kind of OK...but not reallySusana Galilea
4 -1Not quite, but I think close to it.
Yuri Smirnov


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
she was kind of OK...but not really


Explanation:
"to have a moment" is an expression that means something has some amount of interest, but not exactly anything to get too excited about...it is usually a polite way to try to defend someone/something without being terribly convinced

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Note added at 14 mins (2003-12-17 07:48:21 GMT)
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A Working Holiday in the US has its Moments
Wednesday 16th January 2002. A Working Holiday in the US has its Moments.
Summer camp in the United States is a \'rite of passage\' for ...
www.newcastle.edu.au/news/media-releases/ 2002/LYONSus2002.html - 10k - Cached - Similar pages

nbc4columbus.com - Entertainment - \'Daddy Day Care\' Has Its ...
\'Daddy Day Care\' Has Its Moments. ... It may not even be the funniest one you see
this month, but it has its moments, most of them slapstick moments. ...
www.nbc4columbus.com/entertainment/2187948/detail.html - 58k - Cached - Similar pages

HoustonChronicle.com - \'Agent Cody Banks\' has its (few) moments
... minded operation. This movie has its moments, though it still stalls
for lack of a punchy plot -- or even much eye candy. Sets, gizmos ...
www.chron.com/cs/CDA/moviestory.hts/ ae/movies/reviews/1817481 - 35k - Cached - Similar pages


Susana Galilea
United States
Local time: 11:23
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 110

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxIanW: I don't think so, Susana - "to have its moments" is fine, but "to have a moment" is not the same thing
14 mins
  -> darn, it would seem I just had a moment right here ;)

neutral  Michele Johnson: With Ian
23 mins

neutral  Gordon Darroch: agree with Ian
30 mins

neutral  Refugio: True, Susana, this is the problem with search engines' contempt for the all-important little words like 'an' or 'its'
10 hrs
  -> thanks everyone, I had a sneaky suspicion I was off somehow...
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23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Not quite, but I think close to it.


Explanation:
7 moment
If you say that someone or something has their moments, you are indicating that there are times when they are successful or interesting, but that this does not happen very often.
The film has its moments.
He's not the thoroughly outgoing character you'd predict, although he has his moments.
PHR: V inflects
(c) HarperCollins Publishers.


Yuri Smirnov
Local time: 20:23
Native speaker of: Native in BelarusianBelarusian, Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Charlie Bavington: That's all true, but the phrase here is "to have a moment" not "to have its moments" - see also the comments to Susana's answer. Sorry :-)
1 hr
  -> No problem. That's what I meant by "Not quite, but I think close to it."
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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
intense emotional experience


Explanation:
This is quite a recent phrase, often used to express elation but also when someone throws a tantrum or is obviously in a bad mood. The last of these seems to be the case here - Rod's using the phrase ironically to try to get out of answering the question.


    Reference: http://www.livejournal.com/users/tarnish09/39173.html
    Reference: http://www.joannemerriam.com/journal/2001/oct01/31c.html
Gordon Darroch
Local time: 17:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mbc: yes! it´s often used ironically. someone pretends to cry, sniffle and syas, "sorry i´m having a moment" i.e. an intense emotional exp.
7 mins
  -> like those "moments" translators get when a cheque's been overdue for three months;)

agree  Michele Johnson: After reading Madeline's suggestion, I think you have a point. It's not clear whether she broke into tears, or got really angry, or what. I might say intense emotional *reaction* (experience sounds more passive)
51 mins

neutral  Charlie Bavington: not sure it has to be "intense", particularly. Also, not sure Rod's avoiding answering-Parky's Q "if you went out with her, then what did you talk about?" & Rod's response, to me implies a suggested shared experience-that Meg R s'times doesn't talk much.
1 hr

agree  Nado2002
13 hrs
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
she was in a bad mood


Explanation:
This is my no means clear, but I think it means that she was in a bad mood, which would explain why she wasn't "too talkative".

I remember reading about Elton John and what his band and entourage called his "Little Moments", i.e. when he threw a tantrum. I'll see if I can find more concrete evidence to back this up.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2003-12-17 08:20:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I couldn\'t find any further evidence without looking through the zillions of hits for \"had/have a moment\", but I think the native speaker comments below are evidence enough.

xxxIanW
Local time: 18:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 235
Grading comment
Thank you very much!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michele Johnson: Yes, I interpret it as a *bad* moment, like she had a sudden outburst, or refused to talk
8 mins
  -> Yes, "a bad moment" is good (if you know what I mean). Thanks Michele

agree  Gordon Darroch: in the context but I think this phrase has a wider meaning
14 mins

agree  Chris Rowson: Yes, "a moment of ..." ... well the stock phrase to which this refers is " a moment of madness", but here it is left undefined what it is a moment of. Just "one of those moments" ...
15 mins

agree  Sabrina Eskelson
1 hr

agree  Charlie Bavington: yes, obviously it'd help if we could see a tape of the i/v with the fragrant Ms Ryan, but at minimum it's unco-operative, possibly a little sulky, maybe chucking stuff round the green room just before she went on - who knows?!!
1 hr
  -> Hi Charlie - good points there

agree  John Bowden: Could be a bad mood, or certainly odd or out of character in some way - difficult to say exactly without seeing how exactly she behaved
7 hrs

agree  Laurel Porter: indeed - it can also be a "senior moment", i.e. temporary Alzheimer's, or even a brief stab of lascivious feeling... Pretty much any temporary spasm of atypical feelings or behavior.
9 hrs

agree  Refugio: I have also heard, "Sorry, I was having a blonde moment."
9 hrs

agree  Nado2002
14 hrs
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52 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
agreeing with gordon


Explanation:
see example:
The Hammer - Hamilton Man a Proud Ontarian
... God, I love Ontario. I'm…I'm sorry, I'm having a moment," sobbed
Trillium as he broke down on his porch and wept. 4 comments. ...
www.thehammer.ca/content/2003/0901/proud_ontarian.html - 15k -

It doesn´t have to be a bad moment, just intense. Like when two friends meet who haven´t seen each other in years, they excuse their excitement to those around them, "We had a moment."

mbc
Spain
Local time: 18:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gordon Darroch: thanks!
8 mins

agree  Michele Johnson: Valid point, thanks.
40 mins
  ->  i think you´re right that in this case it is bad, but it isn´t always. a tough nuance too explain!
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
"funny five minutes"


Explanation:
Where somebody is visibly acting in a way that seems out of context with a given situation.
'Moment' indicates that it is a temporary thing, something that is triggered, but will pass quickly.
It could be a dreamy withdrawal...a group of friends chatting, and one suddenly 'switches off' with a dreamy smile as a memory is triggered - he's having a moment.
It could be a sudden temper tantrum.
It could be a moment of wild euphoria.
It is a personal thing, and because those witnessing it can't explain it or understand it, they say something like "she's having a moment", "she's gone off on one", "she's having a funny five minutes".
It would appear Meg Ryan was out of sorts (you go on a chat show to chat!)

She is famous for having 'a huge moment' in When Harry met Sally - ..

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 773

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  mbc: excellent explanation, spot on
33 mins

agree  Lisa Lloyd: good one
3 hrs
  -> Thanks. Hard one to explain....

agree  John Bowden: Good explanation - it's quite common recently to talk about "having a moment" of various kinds - e.g. if somebody forgets something ("What did I come in here for?", you can say, "Sorry, I'm having a senior moment - acting like an old, forgetful person
4 hrs

agree  Laurel Porter: yes - covered quite well. hey john, we had a senior moment together (see my comment on Ian's answer)!
6 hrs
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1 day 27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
You're implying she (actually) had a moment (to spare to talk to me)?


Explanation:
You're implying she (actually) had a moment (to spare to talk to me)?

Guess Meg Ryan has a tight schedule/is not very talkative...

chica nueva
Local time: 06:23
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 83

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  yeswhere: yes, this is the more literal usage, and considering her busy schedule, it makes sense. However, it would depend on the inflection: she HAD a moment, meaning had time for you; or she had a MOMENT as in the other answers
7 hrs
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