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White Hope of the ring

English translation: explanation below

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17:19 Oct 10, 2001
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary
English term or phrase: White Hope of the ring
Hello!
I can't translate the first sentance into Russian. I guess the problem is that I don't know who the White Hope of the ring is, what his relations with the Truck Driver's Union are and what is "the fist of a rival member of the Truck Drivers' Union". Help me, please :)

The context:
He was in much the same condition as one White Hope of the ring is after he has put his chin in the way of the fist of a rival member of the Truck Drivers' Union. He knew that he was still alive. More he could not say. The mists of sleep, which still shrouded his brain, and the shake-up he had had from his encounter with the table, a corner of which he had rammed with the top of his head, combined to produce a dreamlike state.
Olga Serbina
English translation:explanation below
Explanation:
the Great White Hope refers to Jack Johnston, and the ring refers to a ring in which a boxing match takes place.

Jack (John Arthur) Johnson (1878-1946)
heavyweight boxing champion, entrepreneur

Jack Johnson became the world's first African-American heavy weight champion in 1908 in a bout with Tommy Burns. He held the title for 7 years.
Born in Galveston, Texas, one of seven children, Jack Johnson dropped out of school after fifth grade and began to do odd jobs around town. He began training to box after beating up a local bully and by 1897 had become a professional boxer. Jack Johnson trained with people like Joe "the Barbados Demon" Walcott and Joe Choyinski. From 1902-1907 he won over 50 matches, some of them against other African-American boxers such as Joe Jeannette, Sam Langford and Sam McVey. This photo shows Johnson (left), in a 1903 match against Sam McVey.

Jack Johnson's career was legendary. In 47 years of fighting, he was only knocked out three times, but his life was troubled. There was a campaign of hatred and bigotry waged against him by whites who wished to regain the heavyweight title and who also resented his interracial relationships with women.

He fought Bob Fitzsimmons, the ex-heavyweight champion in 1906 and knocked him out. But the boxers who succeeded Fitzsimmons refused to fight Johnson because of his color. Instead, another white boxer, Tommy Burns, fought Marvin Hart and won. Burns was then awarded the heavyweight title. He also refused to fight Johnson, but was chided until he finally agreed to a fight on Christmas Day in 1908. Like Muhammad Ali, almost 50 years later, Jack Johnson beat Tommy Burns soundly while dancing around the ring taunting him. He became a hero in Harlem, his 1908 championship bout partially financed by Barron Wilkins, a Harlem club owner and philanthropist. Even then, Jack Johnson was not fully accepted as champion and proponents of white supremacy searched diligently for what they termed a "great white hope" to take the title away from him. They resorted to ex-heavyweight champion James Jeffries to fight Johnson. Their "hope" was defeated in the 15th round in a match surrounded by severe racial tension, in Reno, Nevada, in 1910.

Finally, in 1915 Johnson lost his title to Jess Willard under questionable circumstances. The fight was held in Cuba and it was rumored that Johnson allowed himself to be knocked out in the 16th round. His marriages to white women, against the law at the time, and his flamboyant lifestyle had brought him a great deal of difficulty. He is said to have intentionally lost the fight in order to avoid further trouble with the authorities.

After his career in boxing, Johnson, an amateur cellist and bull-fiddler who was a connoisseur of Harlem night life, eventually opened his own supper club, Club Deluxe, at 142nd Street and Lenox Avenue. He also lectured, sold stocks, and worked as a movie extra. Johnson, who loved to race fancy cars, died as the result of an automobile accident near Raleigh, North Carolina, in June 1946. The play, The Great White Hope, by Howard Sackler which was eventually made into a movie starring James Earl Jones, is based on his life. Johnson was admitted to the Boxing Hall of Fame in 1954.

I hope that this will help guide you in the right direction. Good luck!



Selected response from:

Kateabc
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2explanation below
Kateabc
4 +1A person who usually loses
Kim Metzger


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
explanation below


Explanation:
the Great White Hope refers to Jack Johnston, and the ring refers to a ring in which a boxing match takes place.

Jack (John Arthur) Johnson (1878-1946)
heavyweight boxing champion, entrepreneur

Jack Johnson became the world's first African-American heavy weight champion in 1908 in a bout with Tommy Burns. He held the title for 7 years.
Born in Galveston, Texas, one of seven children, Jack Johnson dropped out of school after fifth grade and began to do odd jobs around town. He began training to box after beating up a local bully and by 1897 had become a professional boxer. Jack Johnson trained with people like Joe "the Barbados Demon" Walcott and Joe Choyinski. From 1902-1907 he won over 50 matches, some of them against other African-American boxers such as Joe Jeannette, Sam Langford and Sam McVey. This photo shows Johnson (left), in a 1903 match against Sam McVey.

Jack Johnson's career was legendary. In 47 years of fighting, he was only knocked out three times, but his life was troubled. There was a campaign of hatred and bigotry waged against him by whites who wished to regain the heavyweight title and who also resented his interracial relationships with women.

He fought Bob Fitzsimmons, the ex-heavyweight champion in 1906 and knocked him out. But the boxers who succeeded Fitzsimmons refused to fight Johnson because of his color. Instead, another white boxer, Tommy Burns, fought Marvin Hart and won. Burns was then awarded the heavyweight title. He also refused to fight Johnson, but was chided until he finally agreed to a fight on Christmas Day in 1908. Like Muhammad Ali, almost 50 years later, Jack Johnson beat Tommy Burns soundly while dancing around the ring taunting him. He became a hero in Harlem, his 1908 championship bout partially financed by Barron Wilkins, a Harlem club owner and philanthropist. Even then, Jack Johnson was not fully accepted as champion and proponents of white supremacy searched diligently for what they termed a "great white hope" to take the title away from him. They resorted to ex-heavyweight champion James Jeffries to fight Johnson. Their "hope" was defeated in the 15th round in a match surrounded by severe racial tension, in Reno, Nevada, in 1910.

Finally, in 1915 Johnson lost his title to Jess Willard under questionable circumstances. The fight was held in Cuba and it was rumored that Johnson allowed himself to be knocked out in the 16th round. His marriages to white women, against the law at the time, and his flamboyant lifestyle had brought him a great deal of difficulty. He is said to have intentionally lost the fight in order to avoid further trouble with the authorities.

After his career in boxing, Johnson, an amateur cellist and bull-fiddler who was a connoisseur of Harlem night life, eventually opened his own supper club, Club Deluxe, at 142nd Street and Lenox Avenue. He also lectured, sold stocks, and worked as a movie extra. Johnson, who loved to race fancy cars, died as the result of an automobile accident near Raleigh, North Carolina, in June 1946. The play, The Great White Hope, by Howard Sackler which was eventually made into a movie starring James Earl Jones, is based on his life. Johnson was admitted to the Boxing Hall of Fame in 1954.

I hope that this will help guide you in the right direction. Good luck!






    Reference: http://www.si.umich.edu/CHICO/Harlem/text/jajohnson.html
Kateabc
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxAbu Amaal: jocular -as if he had been knocked out by a blow on the chin, boxing with another Teamster (or the like)
2 hrs

agree  athena22: Excellent explanation!
5 hrs
  -> Thank you - and thanks to reference above.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
A person who usually loses


Explanation:
Julia is of course quite right about the original Great White Hope being a rival to Jack Johnson. In your context, I would say you can explain the concept this way: people place all their hopes in someone to come along and change things, but this person usually disappoints them. So the White hope of the ring exposes himself to adversity and usually loses. Hope this helps.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 04:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gilda Manara
6 hrs
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