KudoZ home » English » Automotive / Cars & Trucks

screw/bolt

English translation: single-sided fixing / through fixing

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:screw/bolt
English translation:single-sided fixing / through fixing
Entered by: Dan Marasescu
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:58 Dec 26, 2003
English to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Automotive / Cars & Trucks / Automotive
English term or phrase: screw/bolt
Hi,
I'm trying to figure out what is the difference between a screw and a bolt in the following exemple. Can I translate them with the same word or is there a significant difference?

"Remove the screws from the seat belt retractor bracket.
Remove the bolt and the seat belt retractor."


TIA, Dan
Dan Marasescu
Romania
Local time: 22:39
single-sided fixing / through fixing
Explanation:
In lay terms, the word 'screw' is most usually used (as Rita rightly explains) to refer to a threaded fastener that attaches directly into one or other of the parts being fixed; by definition, this means it is most likely to be a single-sided fixing (no access available to the rear) Think of wood screws, or self-tapping sheet metal screws into a panel

By contrast (again as Rita points out), a bolt is usually associated with a nut, so it is a through fixing, requiring access to both ends for tightening. Thus it is rather independent of the nature of th materials being fixed...

Of course, this is a gross simplification, and naturally there ARE certain obvious exceptions to my "rule-of-thumb" --- but I think this works perfectly in your given context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2003-12-26 19:43:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just to clarify matters in your specific context:

it looks as though your \'seat belt retractor bracket\' is attached to the car using screws (logical, as rear access unlikely to be possible), while the \'seat belt retractor\' itself is attached to the bracket using a through bolt (likewise makes sense)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs 50 mins (2003-12-27 08:48:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And of course, no-one has mentioned \'machine screw\' --- in lay terms, we often call a \'bolt\' something that should really be referred to as a \'machine screw\'; I think you\'ll find that by definition, a bolt is not meant to be threaded over its entire length, hence ruling out its use in many places that are through-tapped.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 1 hr 9 mins (2003-12-27 20:07:57 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Nyamuk, for you further helpful explanation. I certainly wasn\'t criticising your answer, merely using the \'neutral\' for its intended purpose of adding a comment without attempting to influence Asker\'s choice either way.

OF COURSE you\'re right in all you say; and it is very interesting to learn about the many different possibilities that might not at first come to mind, or of which one may almost certainly be ignorant. However, the first aim of KudoZ is not to show how clever we are, or how good at Internet \'research\', but to help the Asker make a decision in a particular context; and so I think we can all of us sometimes be guilty of adding too much detail, at the risk of being counter-productive (well, I speak personally, at any rate, as regular KudoZers will know to their cost!) and merely confusing the issue.

I\'d be quite interested to hear if there are differences of usage here too between UK and US --- I rather get the impression this may be the case?

By the way, I don\'t know if you\'ve come across them, but there are some REALLY USEFUL U.S. sites that both describe and illustrate various types of fasteners --- I\'ve found these a real boon!

Happy bolting! :-)
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 22:39
Grading comment
Thank you all. Very helpful explanations.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +6single-sided fixing / through fixing
Tony M
4 +2tapping and methods of entry
R. A. Stegemann
1 +42 different partsRHELLER
4consult construction/shop documentsnyamuk


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +4
2 different parts


Explanation:
the bracket can be attached to the retractor with screws (with thread)
and the retractor can be attached to the car with a bolt
a diagram would surely help

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2003-12-26 19:03:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

a bolt usually attaches with a nut on the other side

see images
http://www.on-b.com/

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 mins (2003-12-26 19:03:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

a bolt usually attaches with a nut on the other side

see images
http://www.on-b.com/

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 14:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anjo Sterringa: You may find the ENG-ENG cardictionary very useful and necessary....http://www.100megsfree4.com/dictionary/car-dicb.htm#Board, screw and bolt are explained. And many many other terms. Good luck!
4 hrs

agree  R. A. Stegemann: Usually but not always, Please see below.
8 hrs

agree  chopra_2002
8 hrs

agree  NancyLynn
17 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
tapping and methods of entry


Explanation:
Bolts do not always require nuts, but they differ from screws in so far as they are never self-tapping. Always they are entered into a thread-bearing hole -- be it a nut at the other side of a surface, or the surface itself.

Screws on the other hand are generally self-tapping, in so far as the screw must create the threads of the hole into which it is entered. The surface must be soft relative to the screw in order for the screw to create its own threads.

One more important difference between screws and bolts is the instrument used for entry. A screw is always entered with a screw driver. A bolt is entered with some sort of wrenching device.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-12-27 03:52:19 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Finally, because the tool of entry differs between screws and bolts, the heads of screws and bolts are often very different in shape.

R. A. Stegemann
Saudi Arabia
Local time: 06:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Helpful additional detail; tho' do note that the last comment re: tools/heads is not really valid, inasmuch as many different tools and head-forms are commonly used for both screws AND bolts
7 hrs
  -> Often is not always, but thanks for your qualified support anyway...!

agree  NancyLynn
9 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
consult construction/shop documents


Explanation:
There is a great deal of variation in what the difference between bolt and screw. You should determine what the usage pattern is in your source material by consulting shop drawings or speaking with someone directly.

screws that look like bolts :
http://www.sdp-si.com/eStore/CoverPg/Mscrews.htm

a bolt that looks like a screw :
http://autobodysupplies.safeshopper.com/25/162.htm?307

or google 'lag bolt' 'hanger bolt'

a nut for blind fastening bolts :
google 'nutsert' 'rivnut'

a self tapping bolt :
http://www.torklift.com/dealersonly/FMT99SDFDSB.pdf



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 22 mins (2003-12-27 19:20:50 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Dusty,

Having worked in metal fabrication and automobile preparation I\'m certain that if I held a hex drive sheet metal screw in my right hand and a hex drive machine bolt in my left that 2/3 to 3/4 of people asked would say the sheet metal screw was a screw and the machine bolt was a bolt. Around a quarter would say that what determined the machine bolt being a screw or bolt was not the fastener itself but what it was fastened to. A small percentage would also say that the sheet metal screw would be called a bolt if it were determined that the dimensions were of a sufficient size.

The reason I included references to fasteners that contradict guidelines provided here was to make the point that there are so many exceptions to rational explanations as to make miscommunications a certainty unless the accepted usage by concerned parties is ascertained either by greater specificity, reference to a mechanical drawing or observation of a pattern of usage.

Among people who are qualified to determine the proper threaded fastener for a job there is a great deal of variety in usage patterns which is why it is imperative to know what the engineer means by bolt what the stockist means by bolt and what the fabricator means by bolt for a specific instance.

nyamuk
United States
Local time: 14:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: In principle, I agree with what you say --- as I pointed out, there ARE lots of exceptions; however, I think Asker's context is clear-cut; and in any case, many people use the terms inaccurately, so I wouldn't trust Web references all that much
2 hrs
  -> notes above
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +6
single-sided fixing / through fixing


Explanation:
In lay terms, the word 'screw' is most usually used (as Rita rightly explains) to refer to a threaded fastener that attaches directly into one or other of the parts being fixed; by definition, this means it is most likely to be a single-sided fixing (no access available to the rear) Think of wood screws, or self-tapping sheet metal screws into a panel

By contrast (again as Rita points out), a bolt is usually associated with a nut, so it is a through fixing, requiring access to both ends for tightening. Thus it is rather independent of the nature of th materials being fixed...

Of course, this is a gross simplification, and naturally there ARE certain obvious exceptions to my "rule-of-thumb" --- but I think this works perfectly in your given context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2003-12-26 19:43:27 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Just to clarify matters in your specific context:

it looks as though your \'seat belt retractor bracket\' is attached to the car using screws (logical, as rear access unlikely to be possible), while the \'seat belt retractor\' itself is attached to the bracket using a through bolt (likewise makes sense)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs 50 mins (2003-12-27 08:48:41 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And of course, no-one has mentioned \'machine screw\' --- in lay terms, we often call a \'bolt\' something that should really be referred to as a \'machine screw\'; I think you\'ll find that by definition, a bolt is not meant to be threaded over its entire length, hence ruling out its use in many places that are through-tapped.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 1 hr 9 mins (2003-12-27 20:07:57 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Nyamuk, for you further helpful explanation. I certainly wasn\'t criticising your answer, merely using the \'neutral\' for its intended purpose of adding a comment without attempting to influence Asker\'s choice either way.

OF COURSE you\'re right in all you say; and it is very interesting to learn about the many different possibilities that might not at first come to mind, or of which one may almost certainly be ignorant. However, the first aim of KudoZ is not to show how clever we are, or how good at Internet \'research\', but to help the Asker make a decision in a particular context; and so I think we can all of us sometimes be guilty of adding too much detail, at the risk of being counter-productive (well, I speak personally, at any rate, as regular KudoZers will know to their cost!) and merely confusing the issue.

I\'d be quite interested to hear if there are differences of usage here too between UK and US --- I rather get the impression this may be the case?

By the way, I don\'t know if you\'ve come across them, but there are some REALLY USEFUL U.S. sites that both describe and illustrate various types of fasteners --- I\'ve found these a real boon!

Happy bolting! :-)

Tony M
France
Local time: 22:39
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Thank you all. Very helpful explanations.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxYusha
22 mins
  -> Thanks, Yusha!

agree  Nado2002
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Nado!

agree  R. A. Stegemann: Yes, good clarification. Please see below for additional distiniquishing features.
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Hamo!

agree  chopra_2002
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Langclinic!

agree  Empty Whiskey Glass
13 hrs
  -> Thanks, Svetozar!

agree  NancyLynn
16 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot, Nancy!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search