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Supplier and Vendor</w context>

English translation: Seller (in procurement)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Vendor
English translation:Seller (in procurement)
Entered by: Natalia Bearden
Options:
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21:17 Jan 29, 2002
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial
English term or phrase: Supplier and Vendor</w context>
Thank so much. Here is the context.
Will suppliers and vendors be paid? (This answer can only be completed after the details are known)
Suppliers and vendors will be paid for all goods and services purchased after the filing in the ordinary course of business. However, all claims for goods and services received prior to the filing, as well as loan and interest payments, are frozen as part of the Chapter 11 process. We are working with the courts to develop a plan to pay suppliers and other creditors as quickly as possible. We anticipate requesting authority from the court to pay pre-petition claims of certain critical vendors.
Mark
Vendor = Seller of Supplier
Explanation:
Campbell R. Harvey's Hypertextual Finance Glossary defines 'Vendor' as 'Seller or supplier'

Supplier is a producer of goods or services, who makes them then available, but not necessarily for money.

Seller, as the word implies, makes the goods or services available for money, but not necessarily produces them.

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Note added at 2002-01-29 23:45:43 (GMT)
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Vendor = Seller OR Supplier

Sorry for the typo!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-30 07:20:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

How about this one then (from Supplier Directory > Glossary of State & Local
Procurement Terms):

Supplier – An individual, partnership or corporation that has been authorized to provide goods or services to the City.

Vendor – An individual, partnership or corporation that sells goods or services

http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:SfD6YpF9NYYC:www.govee....

Glossary of Common Procurement Terms:
VENDOR
Someone who sells something; a \"seller.\"
http://www.mmd.admin.state.mn.us/mn06008.htm

There seems to be a distinction made after all in procurement terminology between the two (unlike in many other spheres, where vendor=supplier)
Selected response from:

Natalia Bearden
Local time: 10:57
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3Vendor = Seller of Supplier
Natalia Bearden
4 +2largely empty verbosityFuad Yahya
5Interesting, my previous answer does not appear.
Hermeneutica
4Suppliers of services and vendors of goodsxxxLia Fail
4 -2goods versus services
Kim Metzger
1No real helpDan McCrosky


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
goods versus services


Explanation:
It's possible that in your case, a distinction is being made between companies providing goods/supplies (suppliers) and services (vendors). As a contracting officer's representative for the US government, I often ran into that distinction. Companies providing training services, for example, were frequently called vendors.

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 2249

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  athena22: The distinction here is really more of post-and pre-filing, I believe, not supplier vs. vendor, both of whom are creditors. (& They plan on trying to get authorization for payment to critical (i.e. SOME) prefiling creditors.) Get a lawyer for this,though!
11 mins

disagree  John Kinory: Just because it says 'Suppliers and vendors will be paid for all goods and services', it does not follow that there is a 1-to-1 correspondence S/G, V/S.
1 hr

disagree  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO): It has nothing to do with "goods and services"
3 hrs
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Vendor = Seller of Supplier


Explanation:
Campbell R. Harvey's Hypertextual Finance Glossary defines 'Vendor' as 'Seller or supplier'

Supplier is a producer of goods or services, who makes them then available, but not necessarily for money.

Seller, as the word implies, makes the goods or services available for money, but not necessarily produces them.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-29 23:45:43 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Vendor = Seller OR Supplier

Sorry for the typo!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-01-30 07:20:49 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

How about this one then (from Supplier Directory > Glossary of State & Local
Procurement Terms):

Supplier – An individual, partnership or corporation that has been authorized to provide goods or services to the City.

Vendor – An individual, partnership or corporation that sells goods or services

http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:SfD6YpF9NYYC:www.govee....

Glossary of Common Procurement Terms:
VENDOR
Someone who sells something; a \"seller.\"
http://www.mmd.admin.state.mn.us/mn06008.htm

There seems to be a distinction made after all in procurement terminology between the two (unlike in many other spheres, where vendor=supplier)

Natalia Bearden
Local time: 10:57
PRO pts in pair: 33
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Kinory: Seller OR supplier, surely?
1 hr
  -> Oops... Fat finger typing :o( Thanks John!

agree  Nenija Hasanic
2 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Werner George Patels, M.A., C.Tran.(ATIO)
3 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Interesting, my previous answer does not appear.


Explanation:
OK, we happen to be in the same situation with a client that went bust (Chapter 11) and we have invoices outstanding ...

Kim's answer is therefore correct.
Think Suppliers = Goods,
Vendors = Services.

Dee

Hermeneutica
Switzerland
Local time: 19:57
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  John Kinory: In the UK at least, one does supply services, and vendors sell goods.
1 hr
  -> Yes, but Chapter 11 is a construct of US law. Hence I was tailoring it to the US

agree  Kim Metzger: Yes, by all means, let's consider that the asker is looking for terms used in the US!
2 hrs
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Suppliers of services and vendors of goods


Explanation:
As I indicated in the previous answer: the perception of suppliers and vendors as providing, respectively, services and goods, is held up here. In other words teh context would seem to support this differentiation.

Note however that later they refer to 'suppliers and other creditors': I doubt that they mean to specifically exclude 'vendors', hence I would say that they could be used interchangeably. As for the 'critical vendors', would these be suppliers of soem kind of 'critical good'?




xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 19:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 86

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Kinory: Not sure I understand, but see my comments above.
1 hr
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
largely empty verbosity


Explanation:
Both Kim's and Natalie's explanations are meaningful.

Kim's (goods vs. services) makes a lot of sense, especially in light of the subsequent language used in the passage.

Natalie's approach is perfect as an abstraction, but the passage is clearly all about making payments to both vendors and suppliers, so it does not seem to apply here.

My somewhat cynical take on this passage is that the writers of this kind of stuff do not really reflect much on the words they choose (or pile up, more accurately). Most of this stuff is formulaic writing that does not really stand up to semantical analysis and is not meant to. Vendors, suppliers, sellers, resellers, purveyers, contractors, subcontractors, . . . Sure there are lexical differences, but I don't think these differences are reflected upon when such masterpieces are written.

Fuad

Fuad Yahya
Native speaker of: Native in ArabicArabic, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 893

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Natalia Bearden: Thanks so much for saying that! Exactly my impression, I just wasn't brave enough to make the statement (besides, it's not my native language after all, and I always assume there might be some sacred message buried very deeply and not apparent to me...)
1 hr

agree  John Kinory: Hear, hear!
7 hrs
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
No real help


Explanation:

This distinction appears to be largely artificial as others have suggested above and brought about by the "double is always better" strategy of many (mostly American, including myself, writers). It is often used in connection with US Code – Title 11 – Chapter 11 proceedings. For this reason, I searched for the two terms in .gov and .org sites with the hope of getting some sort of quasi-official pronouncement on the difference between "vendor" and "supplier".

Please have a look at the excerpt results below:

http://www4.law.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/htm_hl?DB=uscode11&STEMM...

This is the most important reference.

Title 11 – Chapter 11 of the United States Code – Bankruptcy yielded these two hits for "vendor":

"… The right of a secured party with a security interest in or of a lessor or conditional vendor of equipment described in paragraph (2) to take possession of such equipment …

… or of a lessor or conditional vendor of such equipment, to take possession of such equipment in compliance with a security agreement …"

A search of the Title 11 site turned up no results at all for "supplier".

Here are some more results:

http://www2.usatrade.gov/Website/CCG.nsf/CCGurl/CCG-UK2002-C...

"… The EU Distance Selling Directive (97/7/EC) applies to most direct marketing activities. The legislation requires that consumers are given clear and comprehensive information about the vendor and the goods or services offered. The directive also gives the consumer the right of withdrawal within seven days without penalty, and requires the vendor to refund any monies due within thirty days of the cancellation of an order. …"

http://www.usdoj.gov/atr/cases/f9400/9439.htm

"… Disaster recovery vendors serve this critical need for companies by selling a service that enables the restoration of computer applications at another location if a natural disaster, major power outage, or other event causes their customer's primary data centers to become unavailable. Shared hotsite services are the primary service sold by disaster recovery vendors to companies that are dependent on mainframe and other high-end platforms. Because hotsites are shared by multiple clients, they provide cost-effective disaster recovery protection for large companies. …

… SunGard is a Delaware corporation with its principal place of business in Wayne, Pennsylvania. SunGard is a major supplier of information technology. These solutions include investment support systems, trade processing, risk and asset management, as well as business continuity or disaster recovery services. SunGard is a large provider of shared hotsite disaster recovery services, deriving approximately $[REDACTED TEXT] million in revenues from this business. …

… Comdisco is also a major supplier of shared hotsite services, as well as a variety of other electronics equipment leasing and computer services. …

… Most shared hotsite service agreements are three to five years in duration; however, customers frequently renegotiate with their existing supplier for extensions of their contracts, such as when they wish to purchase additional shared hotsite coverage for modified hardware or software applications. …

… When new or additional services are being acquired the price and quality of the services being offered by the customer's incumbent supplier is to some extent constrained by the presence of actual or potential rival suppliers. …"

http://www.house.gov/rules/h1827_017.pdf

"... records of a proprietary nature, maintained solely by the supplier of goods or services …

... any payment error that results from, is substantiated by, or is identified as a result of information contained on any invoice, delivery order, bill of lading, statement of account, or other document submitted to the Government by a supplier of goods or services in the usual and customary conduct of business, or as required by law or contract to substantiate payment for such goods or services, including …

… The term ‘payment activity’ means an executive agency activity that entails making payments to vendors or other non-governmental entities that provide property or services for the direct benefit and use of an executive agency. …"

http://www.dcd.uscourts.gov/01-2196a.pdf

"… Disaster recovery vendors fill this need by selling a variety of
services that enable the restoration of computer applications at another location if a natural disaster, major power outage, or other event causes their customer’s primary data centers to become unavailable. …

… Because only a small number of customers are likely to experience a disaster at any given time, hotsite vendors sell the same physical assets and services to many customers, which “share” the hotsite, thereby reducing the cost. …

… Section 1.31 of the Merger Guidelines also recognizes that vertical integration is relevant to the product market where that integration substitutes for a product (here baby food) that would otherwise have to be obtained from an external vendor. Merger Guidelines § 1.31. …

… SunGard is a major supplier of information technology, including investment support systems, trade processing, risk and asset management, and disaster recovery services. …

http://efoia.bxa.doc.gov/sec232/iron/fe 5-23.pdf

"… As the primary raw material supplier to the domestic steel industry, the U.S. iron ore industry is at risk for significant downsizing due to problems with steel imports. …

… My company, STS Consultants, Ltd. (STS), is a vendor and contractor to the industry in Minnesota and Michigan. …"


In the end, I did not find any official differentiation. Maybe someone else has found something.

It appears to me that there is a very slight tendency, in writing ABOUT US bankruptcies, for many authors to follow Kim's theory that "vendors" sell services and "suppliers" sell goods. This is definitely not a hard and fast rule, however, and maybe even dead wrong.

The US Code itself uses "vendor" together with "equipment"

In many cases, the two terms are used together to make sure nobody feels left out. None the dictionaries often quoted in answer to KudoZ questions even attempt to be very specific about any difference.

The idea of "vendors" only selling services is obviously in strong opposition the "vending machine" that quite definitely sells products and the "Vendo" company (http://www.vendoco.com/) would be quite surprised to be classified as a manufacturer of service selling machines.

No real help,

Dan







Dan McCrosky
Local time: 19:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 18
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