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referee

English translation: People who can recommend you.

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:referee
English translation:People who can recommend you.
Entered by: xxxZEMIRLINE Fo
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

06:18 Oct 23, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Business/Commerce (general)
English term or phrase: referee
Willing to bid for a translation project, I was asked to provide two referees (Name, email, and function).
My question is: What does the referee stands for here ?
xxxZEMIRLINE Fo
Local time: 20:15
People who can recommend you.
Explanation:
Usually people you have worked for. It is a kind of certificate about your competence, ability, quality of work, delivery etc.

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Note added at 6 mins (2004-10-23 06:24:19 GMT)
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After you provide the names, the agency will contact them to ask about their experience with you.

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Note added at 11 mins (2004-10-23 06:29:16 GMT)
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Referee is certainly a typo. It means a judge, usually in sports.
Selected response from:

Syeda Tanbira Zaman
Local time: 00:45
Grading comment
HI: I know that "referee" is not a typo, but I wasn't sure of the exact meaning of it.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +13someone who can be refered to
jerrie
3 +2reference
Cormac Bracken
5 -1reference person
Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
5 -1People who can recommend you.
Syeda Tanbira Zaman
5 -2References
Kurt Porter


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
References


Explanation:
It's got to be some type of typo or incorrect abv.

Kurt Porter
Local time: 00:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  jerrie: UK Eng - this is not a typo - a referee is someone who provides a reference, is referred to for a reference
23 mins
  -> Hmm, ok...if you say so. On the "List," it's very common (at least on American job announcements), to be asked to provide a "List of References)...sometimes it will specify how many, sometimes not.

disagree  Textklick: It's very common in British job advertisements to be asked to provide a "List of References", or people who can be directly contacted to provide information on the applicant.). These people are known as referees.
51 mins
  -> Textklick, thanks. I got it...in the sense I've got to make sure I take British English into account too. :) :) Would Brits normally refer to "references" or "referees" in the job-hunting process? I'm not talking book-wise, I mean in reality.

neutral  DGK T-I: To Kurt's question: Yes it's true, in Britain it's normal. "Please provide 2 referees"(people giving the reference -their names)In the job hunting process (eg: http://www.go-london.gov.uk/about_gol/working_in_gol/downloa... ) In ordinary conversation too ~
4 hrs
  -> Thanks Dr G. Learn something new everyday!
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
People who can recommend you.


Explanation:
Usually people you have worked for. It is a kind of certificate about your competence, ability, quality of work, delivery etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2004-10-23 06:24:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

After you provide the names, the agency will contact them to ask about their experience with you.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2004-10-23 06:29:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Referee is certainly a typo. It means a judge, usually in sports.

Syeda Tanbira Zaman
Local time: 00:45
Native speaker of: Native in BengaliBengali, Native in HindiHindi
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
HI: I know that "referee" is not a typo, but I wasn't sure of the exact meaning of it.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  jerrie: UK Eng - this is not a typo - a referee is someone who provides a reference, is referred to for a reference
23 mins
  -> Thanks for the correction. Just consulted the Chambers Dictionary.
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
reference


Explanation:
I think they must mean "reference". A reference (as you probably know) is somebody who knows you, usually through previous work, and can be contacted directly by the potential new employer, so they can get an independent opinion of you.

A "referee" is someone who provides independent judgement of a sporting game, in case of dispute. I can't see any way it could apply here.

It's perfectly normal for contacts in agencies or other sources of translation business, not to write fluent English. And even native speakers make slips like this (hopefully not English editors though :-) ).

Cormac Bracken
Thailand
Local time: 02:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ernesto de Lara
2 mins

neutral  jerrie: referee does apply here - at least in UK Eng. A referee is someone who provides a judgement on the quality of a person's work/character - ie a reference
18 mins

agree  Textklick: I echo Jerrie's comment
49 mins

neutral  DGK T-I: it's normal in the UK to say (and write) "please provide two referees" (meaning the people who provide the reference) eg: (but not only) http://www.valeroyal.gov.uk/careers/Final_job_application_fo...
4 hrs
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +13
someone who can be refered to


Explanation:
A referee is someone who can be refered to / is the person who will give/provide a reference about you/your work.
Sometimes an employer is looking for a character reference and a work/professional reference - in the case of a translation agency, you would choose 2 other agencies / direct clients you have worked for previously to testify to the quality of your work etc.

Referee is not a typo!

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Note added at 22 mins (2004-10-23 06:40:41 GMT)
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referee

SYLLABICATION: ref·e·ree
PRONUNCIATION: rf-r
NOUN: 1. One to whom something is referred, especially for settlement, decision, or an opinion as to the thing\'s quality. 2. Sports & Games An official supervising the play; an umpire. 3. Law A person appointed by a court to make a determination of a case or to investigate and make a report on it. See synonyms at judge.
VERB: Inflected forms: ref·e·reed, ref·e·ree·ing, ref·e·rees

TRANSITIVE VERB: To judge as referee.
INTRANSITIVE VERB: To act as referee.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=cache:FFgG6lEU0qcJ:www.bris...


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Note added at 23 mins (2004-10-23 06:41:44 GMT)
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Name of Referee:

Address:

Position held:


Applicant - after you have completed ‘SECTION A’ please hand or send one form to each person who has agreed to act as a referee concerning your academic and/or professional work.


SECTION B (to be completed by the referee)



    Reference: http://www.bartleby.com/61/41/R0114100.html
jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Kurt Porter: reference...as in "List of References," Not "List of Referees."
5 mins
  -> The asker has been asked to provide (the names of) two referees - a referee is someone who provides a reference - not too sure what 'lists' have to do with the question, one only needs 2 - not a list!

agree  Textklick: Your response is correct IMHO. The extent of research alone suggests that your decision is final.
41 mins
  -> Thanks for your learned judgement and testimony

agree  Lamprini Kosma
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  Olga B
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Marie Andersson (Allen): Agree, but it's more common to ask for "references" than "referees"
2 hrs
  -> Agreed ;-)

agree  Clare Barnes
3 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  xxxcmwilliams
3 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  zaphod
4 hrs

agree  DGK T-I: normal for the UK, eg: "Please provide two referees..." http://www.weymouth.gov.uk/docstore/personnel/jobs/applicati... //To Deborah: the OED has referees giving 'characters'(old word for references) in 1862,demonstrating it's pretty traditional~
5 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Asghar Bhatti
5 hrs

agree  Elena Petelos: UK list of referees.... :-) everywhere, uni, work etc. :-)
6 hrs
  -> Thanks ;-))

agree  Mapi: totally agree, though the first time I saw it in a job application form it looked strange too
7 hrs
  -> whistle-blowing ;-(( - thanks!

agree  Deborah Workman: Yes, someone who can be refer*R*ed to. Not traditional, but used. I suppose the applicant is the "referrer" and the person the applicant names is the "referee". Is the "reference" then the action of referring or that of vouching for, we wonder .....? :-]
10 hrs

agree  nlingua
13 hrs

agree  Pawel Gromek: that works
14 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
reference person


Explanation:
reference person

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Note added at 7 mins (2004-10-23 06:25:52 GMT)
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Here you have to provide the details of two persons/agencies for whom you have previously worked. The current translation agency wants know about you (everything about you as a translator) from those sources.

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Note added at 1 hr 18 mins (2004-10-23 07:36:13 GMT)
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sorry for the omission:
The current translation agency wants \"to\" know......

Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
Bangladesh
Local time: 01:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in BengaliBengali
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Marie Andersson (Allen): this is not correct English
2 hrs
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