the reaction was followed/monitored by NMR spectroscopy

English translation: I'd say they're synonyms

10:22 Nov 27, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Science - Chemistry; Chem Sci/Eng
English term or phrase: the reaction was followed/monitored by NMR spectroscopy
Are followed and monitored synonyms? I have always allowed the use of both when editing manuscripts but I've recently been ordered to only use "monitored". I'm not sure whether this is simply a question of house style or a linguistic point. Thanks in advance.
Dr. Andrew Frankland
Spain
Local time: 11:32
English translation:I'd say they're synonyms
Explanation:
I'd guess it's just in-house style - the meaning is the same in this context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2006-11-27 10:40:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I was just about to post a comment to David's answer when I realised (as he already had) that you seem to be asking about the two terms in general, not only in this specific case. While for your example the two terms are synonyms, as David points out there are many cases where they have a different meaning.

So I'd say you need to evaluate which to use on a case-by-case basis.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2006-11-27 10:44:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Following Andrew's note, I stick by my original answer.
Selected response from:

Marie-Hélène Hayles
Local time: 11:32
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for their answers/comments. Shame I can't share the points out.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3I'd say they're synonyms
Marie-Hélène Hayles
3 +3monitored
David Knowles
3 +1followed by + potential for misunderstanding
Melanie Nassar


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
the reaction was followed/monitored by nmr spectroscopy
monitored


Explanation:
"followed" has more the meaning of "observed", whereas "monitored" allows the possibility of changes as a result of the observation.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2006-11-27 10:28:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

E.g. His blood sugar levels were monitored, and insulin administered automatically as a result. I don't think you could use "followed" here.
If it's an operation being observed by a camera, you could say: all the actions of the surgeon were followed/tracked by the camera.

David Knowles
Local time: 10:32
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  kmtext
11 mins

agree  monbuckland
19 mins

agree  Cristina Chaplin
48 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
the reaction was followed/monitored by nmr spectroscopy
followed by + potential for misunderstanding


Explanation:
I can image a number of cases where "followed by" might lead to misunderstanding, as if describing a sequence of events. I actually prefer monitoring in this context.

Melanie Nassar
United States
Local time: 12:32
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet: "followed by" might be misunderstood, especially by a layman
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
the reaction was followed/monitored by nmr spectroscopy
I'd say they're synonyms


Explanation:
I'd guess it's just in-house style - the meaning is the same in this context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 18 mins (2006-11-27 10:40:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I was just about to post a comment to David's answer when I realised (as he already had) that you seem to be asking about the two terms in general, not only in this specific case. While for your example the two terms are synonyms, as David points out there are many cases where they have a different meaning.

So I'd say you need to evaluate which to use on a case-by-case basis.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 22 mins (2006-11-27 10:44:04 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Following Andrew's note, I stick by my original answer.

Marie-Hélène Hayles
Local time: 11:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
Thanks to everyone for their answers/comments. Shame I can't share the points out.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gillian Scheibelein: In chemspeak, these terms are interchangeable. Nevertheless, I tend to use monitoring if the reaction is just being watched to see when it is complete, and "followed" if they are measuring kinetic parameters
26 mins

agree  David Wright (X)
1 hr

agree  Jörgen Slet: I have noticed the tendencies that Gillian describes :)
4 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search