give me way too much

English translation: you gave me more than enough, more than necessary

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:you gave me way too much
English translation:you gave me more than enough, more than necessary
Entered by: Oso (X)

03:28 Apr 30, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama / subtitle
English term or phrase: give me way too much
Sir, please. Sir, I'm sorry,
but you gave me way too much.
Yohanes Sutopo
Local time: 14:08
you gave me more than enough, more than necessary
Explanation:
It's probably talking about money...
But without context, who knows!
Good luck from Oso ¶:^)
Selected response from:

Oso (X)
Grading comment
Thank you.

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +9you gave me more than enough, more than necessary
Oso (X)
5me dio / sirvió (ha dado / servido) demasiado
Jaime Oriard
5 -1you yield me too much
Ernesto de Lara


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
me dio / sirvió (ha dado / servido) demasiado


Explanation:
Suerte

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Note added at 2 mins (2005-04-30 03:31:17 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Entonces, de acuerdo con la nota:

entregó, devolvió, etc...

Jaime Oriard
Mexico
Local time: 02:08
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
you gave me more than enough, more than necessary


Explanation:
It's probably talking about money...
But without context, who knows!
Good luck from Oso ¶:^)

Oso (X)
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Can Altinbay: Whatever it is that was given, it was much more than expected/necessary.
1 min
  -> Thanks, Can ¶:^)

agree  Robert Donahue (X)
16 mins
  -> Thank you, Robert ¶:^)

agree  humbird: It can be anything -- from money to compassion, or something tangible or intangible. For either way this works.
32 mins
  -> Thank you, humbird ¶:^)

agree  RHELLER: maybe it's popcorn, while they are watching 9 to 5
1 hr
  -> ¶;^)!! Thank you, Rita ¶:^)

agree  Java Cafe
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Java ¶:^)

agree  Refugio
2 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias, Ruth ¶:^)

agree  Rania KH
12 hrs
  -> Thank you, Rania ¶:^)

agree  conejo
13 hrs
  -> Thank you, conejo ¶:^)

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
1 day 6 hrs
  -> Thank you, Marju ¶:^)
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
you yield me too much


Explanation:
that's it

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 32 mins (2005-04-30 07:00:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry for being tough. It looks that you are not familiar with the asceptions of the verb yield, which is used as a transitive verb. In fact its origin is that. Please see:
http://www.bartleby.com/61/5/Y0020550.html
where you could read, if you wish the asception as I used it here.

Ernesto de Lara
Local time: 01:08
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Can Altinbay: This is not correct grammatically. I would defer to Oso's answer.//I'm not going to argue with you. Nobody talks this way. I didn't even give you a "disagree" here.
7 mins
  -> Sorry Mr. Twain You can find a ref. to this ungrammatically bars and stars unacceptable disgusting comment at the book: English Idioms and how to use them edited in by the Oxford University Press (far away from the Coasts of Florida)

neutral  RHELLER: Here is the proof: yield (verb) means to produce or to succumb to. Your entry puts the verb between 2 people which eliminates the first; the second would require "to" BUT that meaning does not apply here-EXCEPTION -watch your spelling
2 hrs
  -> Prove it! Please see my note and link above

disagree  Refugio: not understandable in English // certainly I don't understand everything in English ... I only understand what is clear.
2 hrs
  -> So you understand everything in english!

neutral  Ken Cox: methinks you need to have a look at the Kudoz rules regarding politeness
11 hrs
  -> thanks Kenneth. Yes. 'We' should be more polite.
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