pushing all over the place

English translation: not keeping a straight line

18:31 Aug 6, 2019
English to English translations [PRO]
Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
English term or phrase: pushing all over the place
Hello:

My car was pushing all over the place and it was loose out.

What does mean "pushing all over the place" mean in this phrase?

Thank you in advance.
marijas
English translation:not keeping a straight line
Explanation:
probably...seems like bad English?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 days (2019-08-20 10:17:26 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

See the Dbox and Alison's reference in particular that shows that I and all those agreeing with me were wrong after all and that this is in fact Indycar jargon.

So "pushing" is "understeer" and "loose" is oversteer"
although both of these imply that a straight line is not kept??

Actually, here is the ref Alison found:

See this Indycar glossary

Pushing: Term used to describe that car does not want to turn in the corners because of a lack of tire grip. This can be caused by a lack of downforce on the front of the car or too much downforce on the rear of the car. Also known as “understeer.”
Loose: Terms used to describe that rear of the car is unstable because of a lack of rear-tire grip caused by too much front downforce or not enough rear downforce. Also known as “oversteer.”
https://www.indycar.com/Fan-Info/INDYCAR-101/Glossary
Selected response from:

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 23:52
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +3not keeping a straight line
Yvonne Gallagher
4veering uncontrollably to the left or right
David Hollywood
3[bad English - No, but heavily colloquial]
Posted via ProZ.com Mobile
IanDhu


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
[bad English - No, but heavily colloquial]


Explanation:
This a (designedly?) slangy piece, with probably a humorous undertone.

IanDhu
France
Local time: 00:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
veering uncontrollably to the left or right


Explanation:
in other words the steering system was out of control

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Note added at 9 hrs (2019-08-07 03:45:22 GMT)
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"loose out"escapes me as English

David Hollywood
Local time: 19:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
not keeping a straight line


Explanation:
probably...seems like bad English?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 days (2019-08-20 10:17:26 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

See the Dbox and Alison's reference in particular that shows that I and all those agreeing with me were wrong after all and that this is in fact Indycar jargon.

So "pushing" is "understeer" and "loose" is oversteer"
although both of these imply that a straight line is not kept??

Actually, here is the ref Alison found:

See this Indycar glossary

Pushing: Term used to describe that car does not want to turn in the corners because of a lack of tire grip. This can be caused by a lack of downforce on the front of the car or too much downforce on the rear of the car. Also known as “understeer.”
Loose: Terms used to describe that rear of the car is unstable because of a lack of rear-tire grip caused by too much front downforce or not enough rear downforce. Also known as “oversteer.”
https://www.indycar.com/Fan-Info/INDYCAR-101/Glossary

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 23:52
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 40
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JaneTranslates: Agree. It's certainly not like any version of standard English, as far as I know. But I don't speak Automobile.
1 hr
  -> Many thanks:-)

agree  Tony M: In my experience of BE, we'd more likjely say "pulling to the right / left / all over the place" — 'pushing' might be a reflection of rear wheel drive in the US (period?)?
1 hr
  -> Many thanks:-)

agree  Tina Vonhof: No pushing in the US English either: pulling or veering right and left.
1 hr
  -> Many thanks:-)

neutral  philgoddard: I don't see how you arrive at this - I've never heard it, and you haven't given any references.
18 hrs

agree  Omri Ofek Luzon
22 hrs
  -> Many thanks:-) see added note

disagree  David Moore: Sorry, Yvonne, but Alison's reference is impeccable...
1 day 13 hrs
  -> Yes, it is. But I don't understand why you didn't disagree with all answers?
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