You’ve done very well for yourself

English translation: You've been very successful

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:You’ve done very well for yourself
English translation:You've been very successful
Entered by: Catherine Bolton

15:07 Oct 18, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
English term or phrase: You’ve done very well for yourself
Driver:
I am a fruiterer and a greengrocer. That’s my van and this is one of my roads.
Tom:
You’ve done very well for yourself, haven’t you?
Driver:
I don’t own the road. I didn’t say I owned the road. What I am saying is I have worked myself up in all the roads round here.
Tom:
I believe that. You’re doing it again. Just what are you on about?
Driver:
Private enterprise! It’s taken me ten years to work up this round and I’m not having anyone pushing in!

‘The Good Life’
lim0nka
United Kingdom
Local time: 02:37
you've been very successful
Explanation:
Simply means that the driver has developed his business into something profitable and successful. He's doing well in his career/business.
Selected response from:

Catherine Bolton
Local time: 03:37
Grading comment
Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +8you've been very successful
Catherine Bolton
5 +2It's a deliberate, humorous ambiguity...
John Bowden
5Achieved a level of success
Kurt Porter


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
you’ve done very well for yourself
you've been very successful


Explanation:
Simply means that the driver has developed his business into something profitable and successful. He's doing well in his career/business.

Catherine Bolton
Local time: 03:37
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kurt Porter: Early bird gets the worm! :) :) :)
3 mins
  -> Thanks! Not so early in this part of the world right now!

agree  RHELLER: through hard work (the old fashioned way- he didn't just buy stocks :-)
6 mins
  -> Right, like the translating business... ;-)

agree  cmwilliams (X)
12 mins

agree  Java Cafe
31 mins

agree  Ian M-H (X)
1 hr

agree  Refugio
1 hr

neutral  John Bowden: Yes, but that misses the deliberate ambiguity and the quarrel...
3 hrs

agree  conejo
3 hrs

agree  Orla Ryan
2 days 19 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
you’ve done very well for yourself
Achieved a level of success


Explanation:
Accomplished something.

Kurt Porter
Local time: 06:37
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Bowden: same comment as to cbolton - see my answer below-
3 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
It's a deliberate, humorous ambiguity...


Explanation:
- if I remember the episode correctly, Tom is arguing with the Fruiterer, because he(Tom) is trying to sell his home-grown vegetables by knocking on doors, and the Fruiterer is saying he already delivers to this road and therefore doesn't want Tom's competition ("I’m not having anyone pushing in!")

So, Tom deliberately misunderstands him by taking the Fruitere's words literally to make him angry/frustrated:

"That's my van" = "that van belongs to me"

but Tom then deliberately misunderstands "that's one of my roads" to mean "this road belongs to me" rather than "this is one of the roads on my delivery round" - so he says "You've done well for yourself" (if you own a whole road), making the Fruiterer say, in exasperation, "I don’t own the road. I didn’t say I owned the road"...

HTH

John Bowden
Local time: 02:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jörgen Slet
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller: plus the ambiguity of "worked myself up" which Tom takes to mean "get upset" ("you're doing it again")
15 hrs
  -> Thanks - yes, that's right, that came up in the other question
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