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fall line

English translation: a range of goods or products designed for the autumn/fall season

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20:28 Oct 23, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
English term or phrase: fall line
A character walks into a hardware store and says:
What a disgusting store. Don't they even have a fall line?
Zdenka Ivkovcic
Croatia
Local time: 00:28
English translation:a range of goods or products designed for the autumn/fall season
Explanation:
It's rather hard to be sure, with so little context, but it sounds as if it just might be an ironic or humerous comment (is it from a comedy film or TV programme for example, or a comic novel?).

If that's the case, the speaker is probably disgusted with the type of goods on sale in the hardware store and comments on how uninspiring/unexciting she'he finds them by using language more often associtated with fashion - the fall (US Eng.), or autumn (Br. Eng) being the fashions (or shoes, for example) produced for that autumn season.

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Note added at 15 mins (2006-10-23 20:44:06 GMT)
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'humourous' - sorry about the typo.

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Note added at 16 mins (2006-10-23 20:44:58 GMT)
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'....she/he' finds them...' - apologies again

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Note added at 1 day13 mins (2006-10-24 20:41:47 GMT)
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Re. your note: if the character dresses fashionably, then it does seem as if this an ironic comment, made for comic effect. May I ask if it comes from a book, play, TV series or film?
Selected response from:

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 00:28
Grading comment
Thank you for your help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +7a range of goods or products designed for the autumn/fall season
Caryl Swift
2clear division/segmentation of the wares sold
Erich Ekoputra


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
clear division/segmentation of the wares sold


Explanation:
It's hard to think that a hardware store gets a fall line just as it is used in fashion shops, except, as Caryl said: the term is used as an irony.

But, this is another way to see it:
fall line (Oxford dict, 2nd meaning) = a narrow zone that marks the geological boundary between an upland region and a plain.

So, the speaker might contempt the jumbled display or merchandise arrangement of the store; there is no clear line separating, say, plumbing hardware from car maintenance tools.


Erich Ekoputra
Indonesia
Local time: 05:28
Native speaker of: Native in IndonesianIndonesian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +7
a range of goods or products designed for the autumn/fall season


Explanation:
It's rather hard to be sure, with so little context, but it sounds as if it just might be an ironic or humerous comment (is it from a comedy film or TV programme for example, or a comic novel?).

If that's the case, the speaker is probably disgusted with the type of goods on sale in the hardware store and comments on how uninspiring/unexciting she'he finds them by using language more often associtated with fashion - the fall (US Eng.), or autumn (Br. Eng) being the fashions (or shoes, for example) produced for that autumn season.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 15 mins (2006-10-23 20:44:06 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'humourous' - sorry about the typo.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 mins (2006-10-23 20:44:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

'....she/he' finds them...' - apologies again

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day13 mins (2006-10-24 20:41:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Re. your note: if the character dresses fashionably, then it does seem as if this an ironic comment, made for comic effect. May I ask if it comes from a book, play, TV series or film?

Caryl Swift
Poland
Local time: 00:28
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 15
Grading comment
Thank you for your help.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxcmwilliams: seems likely
4 mins
  -> Thank you ! :-)

agree  Dave Calderhead
5 mins
  -> Thank you! :-)

agree  Olga Layer
2 hrs
  -> Thank you ! :-)

agree  Emily Goodpaster: That's my understanding too- actually quite funny....
6 hrs
  -> Yes - made me smile too! Thank you! :-)

agree  Alison Jenner
11 hrs
  -> Thank you ! :-)

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
20 hrs
  -> Thank you! :-)

agree  Sophia Finos
1 day1 hr
  -> Thank you! :-)
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Changes made by editors
Oct 23, 2006 - Changes made by ntext:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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