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crap with two p’s

English translation: can I quote you on that

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10:49 Jun 24, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
English term or phrase: crap with two p’s
Havers said, he's just working on an impression of you. And Prescott said I don’t care a crap what he says, and then walked straight on so hard the door sort of swung back, so I called after him is that crap with two p’s, he said yes it's crap with two p’s, he said don’t forget, I get the last word.
lim0nka
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:15
English translation:can I quote you on that
Explanation:
It is common enough to ask politicians if they are speaking on or off the record. Especially one as outspoken as Prescott.
It is also common for journalists to check the spelling of words used in quotes.
I would suggest that this is therefore (irrespective of whether Havers is a journo or not) a witty (relatively!) way of asking Prescott if he can be quoted as having said "I don't care a crap what he says".
Indeed, I have a heard a similar rejoinder in a context that I won't spell out, where the question was "is that with one 'f' or two?" and the answer was "one, but make it a capital".

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Note added at 6 hrs 14 mins (2004-06-24 17:04:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

When I say \'quote\', I don\'t mean necessarily writing an article. I use it in the vernacular sense - can I quote you on that? meaning approximately - do I have your permission to tell other people that you just said that?
Selected response from:

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 13:15
Grading comment
Thank you very much for all your answers.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3probably a reference to his surname...
jgal
4 +3can I quote you on thatCharlie Bavington
5 -1A slang for strong disagreementRamesh Madhavan
3 +1big crap
Melanie Nassar
4Crap with two p'sxxxasusisu
3crap with two peesVladimir Lioukaikine


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
crap with two p’s
probably a reference to his surname...


Explanation:
I would suspect that it is Havers' way of winding up Prescott, by referring to the fact that his name is spelt with 2 't's (rather than the more usual 'Prescot').

jgal
Local time: 14:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
9 mins

agree  Aoife Kennedy: Sounds reasonable.
37 mins

agree  Craft.Content: The character in the first person seems quite quick-witted :-) to think of a question to ask Prescott while the door was swinging back ... :-)
1 hr
  -> Yes. And John Prescott really does like to get the last word!

neutral  David Sirett: Don't think this works, mainly because I don't agree that 'Prescot' is more usual than 'Prescott' (the reverse IMO).
1 hr
  -> Really? I know several people called Prescot and no-one called Prescott. There's even a town called Prescot, near Liverpool.

neutral  Charlie Bavington: I'm with David S. on this one. Sounds a bit contrived.
6 hrs

neutral  nlingua: what do you think about Charlie Bavington's theory?
8 hrs
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
crap with two p’s
Crap with two p's


Explanation:
Haver's is implying that the two p's are the word cra(p) itself and the other being (P)rescott himself, there you have the two P's

xxxasusisu
Local time: 13:15
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
crap with two p’s
big crap


Explanation:
I have never heard this expression before, but without any more context or background, my reaction as a US native speaker would be to guess that "crap with 2 p's" means big crap or real crap, or in general, crappier than plain crap.

Melanie Nassar
United States
Local time: 15:15
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 12

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nancy Arrowsmith
47 mins
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
crap with two p’s
crap with two pees


Explanation:
A homophone perhaps?

This would mean that he couldn't care less, of course.

"Two pees and a poo" before flushing...
http://www.lighthousefriends.com/light.asp?ID=397


Vladimir Lioukaikine
Local time: 16:15
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
crap with two p’s
A slang for strong disagreement


Explanation:
Crap is the slang for excreta, meaning non-sense ( I don't agree); typically used when some idea or opinion is not accepted by the receiver who wants to express his/her disapproval in strong terms. BULL CRAP = Bull Shit. The "two p's" is to covey forcefully that it is WORSE than normal Crap.

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Note added at 4 hrs 4 mins (2004-06-24 14:54:09 GMT)
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By (I don\'t agree) I mean (\"I don\'t agree\")

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 5 mins (2004-06-24 14:55:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Convey..not covey. Sorry for the typo.

Ramesh Madhavan
Local time: 17:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TamilTamil
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Enza Longo
1 hr
  -> Thanks Longo

disagree  Charlie Bavington: The usual way in (UK) English to indicate emphasis in this way is not to add letters to the end of the word, but to capitalise the initial letter. So it would be "crap with a capital 'C' .
4 hrs
  -> I agree about UK English, but "Crap" is originally an American slang Charlie.

disagree  Jamiewalke: agree with Charlie
8 hrs
  -> Please see my response to Charlie's opinion.
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
crap with two p’s
can I quote you on that


Explanation:
It is common enough to ask politicians if they are speaking on or off the record. Especially one as outspoken as Prescott.
It is also common for journalists to check the spelling of words used in quotes.
I would suggest that this is therefore (irrespective of whether Havers is a journo or not) a witty (relatively!) way of asking Prescott if he can be quoted as having said "I don't care a crap what he says".
Indeed, I have a heard a similar rejoinder in a context that I won't spell out, where the question was "is that with one 'f' or two?" and the answer was "one, but make it a capital".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs 14 mins (2004-06-24 17:04:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

When I say \'quote\', I don\'t mean necessarily writing an article. I use it in the vernacular sense - can I quote you on that? meaning approximately - do I have your permission to tell other people that you just said that?

Charlie Bavington
Local time: 13:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Thank you very much for all your answers.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jamiewalke: Exactly. Very British.
3 hrs

agree  sylvie malich: Good explanation.
22 hrs

agree  xxxAlfa Trans
7 days
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