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a-funting, a-thraking and a-wornapping

English translation: hunting, tracking and napping

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:a-funting, a-thraking and a-wornapping
English translation:hunting, tracking and napping
Entered by: Will Matter
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00:13 Aug 2, 2004
English to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Cinema, Film, TV, Drama
English term or phrase: a-funting, a-thraking and a-wornapping
"Good Life"

George:
Where have you been hiding yourselves?
Tom:
Us'n George? We'm been a-funting and a-thraking and a-wornapping, didn't 'un?

Geeeee...
lim0nka
United Kingdom
Local time: 13:15
Idiomatic usage, stylistic and literary usage
Explanation:
The writer is expressing the way that speaker is speaking, the meaning (in standard English) is "We were hunting and tracking and were (also) napping". Strange but true. HTH.
Selected response from:

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 05:15
Grading comment
Even if id doesn't make much sense in English, I have to translate ot somehow... Thank you all for your help.
Btw., Dusty, in this episode Jerry went on holidays to Kenya. ;)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1Idiomatic usage, stylistic and literary usageWill Matter
3 +2See explanation below...
Tony M
3 +2Hunting
Martine Brault


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Hunting


Explanation:
Funting:
In those days, deer was very numerous, and the Indians, in spring and summer, hunted them with their hounds into the river, where it was no trouble to kill them. I have seen hunters drive a deer right before the bow of their canoe, all the way from near Percy Boom to the Fetterly Landing and Mr. Fetterly was one of them. Most every fall, hunters from Rawdon and Sidney with their dogs, came up and camp by the riverside and kill vast numbers of fine deer and take waggen-loads to Halleville and elsewhere to sell. I have known John Waver, of Rawdon, to spend weeks in Seymour, funting deer; and I have seen, the trees all round him camp hung with dead deer, ready to be loaded into his waggon
I have also come across fox-funting (in England)

Thracking:
"I WAS out thracking hares meeself, and I seen a fine puss of a thing hopping, hopping in the moonlight, and whacking her ears about, now up, now down, and winking her great eyes, and--"Here goes," says I, and the thing was so close to me that she turned round and looked at me, and then"
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/yeats/fip/fip46.htm

But I have never encountered wornapping...




Martine Brault
Canada
Local time: 08:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
48 mins
  -> Thank you Vicky

agree  Eva Karpouzi
58 mins
  -> Thank you
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Idiomatic usage, stylistic and literary usage


Explanation:
The writer is expressing the way that speaker is speaking, the meaning (in standard English) is "We were hunting and tracking and were (also) napping". Strange but true. HTH.

Will Matter
United States
Local time: 05:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Even if id doesn't make much sense in English, I have to translate ot somehow... Thank you all for your help.
Btw., Dusty, in this episode Jerry went on holidays to Kenya. ;)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxsarahl: kawatta hirune da neee!
1 hr
  -> Kono hitotachi mo chotto kawattan ja nai ka? Omoshirooooi.

neutral  Maisar: The words in the show are invented by the character as cod yokel talk and understood by viewers as such - any resemblance to real words is purely coincidental.
8 hrs
  -> Too, too big of a "coincidence" as to be entirely accidental IMHO, after all, the linguistic underpinnings of everything said IS English, speakers statement reflects that, unconsciously or otherwise, stand by my answer.

neutral  Tony M: Yes, I have to agree with Maisar's comment; apart from anything else, hunting etc. would have been rather against Tom's self-sufficiency ethic; I'm sure these are MEANT to be made-up words, even if there is coincidental resemblance to certain real words
18 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
See explanation below...


Explanation:
Knowing this comedy series (I'm assuming this is the UK one?) as well as I do, I don't think there is any 'real' intended meaning in these words --- I get the impression is just using 'mock' rustic language, with words that the writers probably picked almost at random, or even made up (or thoguht they were so doing...)

I'm a bit puzzled, perhaps Asker could confirm if this IS the UK series, as I thought the characters were called Tom and Jerry? Is George an error, or is this another character --- or have I just got the wrong series?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs 27 mins (2004-08-02 21:40:51 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Thanks, Asker for that confirmation; in that case, I feel even more confident about my answer. BTW, OED does not list \'funt\' or \'wornap\', and only lists \'thrack\' (NOT \'thrake\') as a \'long dialect\' word meaning \'to cram or pack in\' --- nothing seemingly to do with \'tracking\'. As for \'funting\', Traviata\'s reference above seems to suggest a US connection (if it\'s not a spelling error anyway), while this is a SO BRITISH comedy show.

Just to follow up Maisar\'s comment --- I was sad to learn that Stanley Unwin is no longer with us, he was a side-splitting part of my childhood. But I think his spoonerisms and mixed-up but plausible-sounding words were a little different from this kind of cod-yokel \'worzel-speak\' (sometimes likened to \'Mumerset\'), of which I think the prime example (if not true precursor) was the Ramblin\' Sid Rumpole character

Tony M
France
Local time: 14:15
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 64

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lesley Clayton: oo aarrh! (if it is indeed the series you're thinking of)
42 mins
  -> Thanks, Lesley!

neutral  Will Matter: too close to what i propose to be entirely accidental...No, i meant that i don't accept this just as 'coincidentally' resembling English, no reflection on your answer whatsoever.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Willmatter! But what on earth do you mean 'entirely accidental...' I hope you're not suggesting I copied your work to try and score the points???!!! No, I think the difference is I've explained a cultural nicety that Asker might have missed...

agree  Maisar: The late Professor Stanley Unwin was perhaps the foremost authority on the subject.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Maisar! Oh yes indeed! And do you remember Kenny Williams' 'Ramblin' Sid Rumpole'? :-))
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