Chester turkey

English translation: a \"Chester\"

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:Chester turkey
Selected answer:a \"Chester\"
Entered by: asia20002

10:04 Sep 14, 2010
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
English term or phrase: Chester turkey
This is one of ingredients in the recipe.
Party Chester turkey
1 Chester turkey (approx. 2.5 kg)
Is it a turkey or another bird and is this name connected with the city of Chester?
asia20002
Poland
Local time: 00:32
a "Chester"
Explanation:
It sounds as if it isn't actually a turkey, but a variety of chicken: http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/10632/move-over-tu...

Chester is the name of the variety, so it doesn't matter whether it is referring to the city, to someone's surname or whatever. "Perdigao", who developed the genetic variety, gave it this name.

It is also a trade name, and therefore should be left unaltered.

If you are unhappy about whether to call it a chicken or a turkey, then you could just opt for "bird" or nothing at all, as I have done.

"Perdigao S/A Comércio, along with its two main operating companies, Perdigao Alimentos S/A and Perdigao Agroindustrial S/A, went public in 1980, listing on the Brazil stock exchange. The following year, Perdigao began marketing a new poultry brand, Chester, after the company's research and development team had succeeded in breeding a chicken that concentrated 70 percent of its meat in its breast and thigh portions. The Chester brand was then expanded in 1982 to include low-fat products. " http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/Perdigao-SA...

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Note added at 19 mins (2010-09-14 10:23:38 GMT)
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Definitely a chicken: http://www.chester.com.br/ The Perdigao company sells many pre-prepared chickens, and the main ingredient is listed as "Special chicken (frango special)".

As Tony points out, the brand seems to be v popular in Brazil, but I can't find references outside. There is a chain of fast food chicken outlets called Chester, but I don't think they are connected.

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Note added at 20 mins (2010-09-14 10:24:36 GMT)
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Sorry, hadn't seen your note below until now:

I would use "a Chester chicken" then.

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Note added at 1 hr (2010-09-14 11:36:23 GMT)
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Re your second note: OK!

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Note added at 6 hrs (2010-09-14 16:13:55 GMT)
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I think turkey is an inaccuracy
Selected response from:

Fiona Gilbert Riley
Spain
Local time: 00:32
Grading comment
Thank you.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +7a "Chester"
Fiona Gilbert Riley
4 +3actually a type of chicken
Catharine Cellier-Smart
4 -1Chester turkey
Komeil Zamani Babgohari


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
chester turkey
Chester turkey


Explanation:
turkey is the name of a bird and chester a city

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Note added at 3 mins (2010-09-14 10:08:31 GMT)
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Sweet golden Chester turkey

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Note added at 4 mins (2010-09-14 10:09:31 GMT)
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http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/10632/move-over-tu...

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Note added at 6 mins (2010-09-14 10:10:49 GMT)
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http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&q=chester&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq...

Komeil Zamani Babgohari
Iran
Local time: 03:02
Native speaker of: Native in Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian), Native in Persian (Farsi)Persian (Farsi)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Well, your ref. actually explains that it isn't a turkey at all, so that may be a bit of a red herring!
4 mins

disagree  airmailrpl: a Chester is a Chicken bred to have larger breast meat
12 mins
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
chester turkey
actually a type of chicken


Explanation:
see below
"Instead of turkey for the holidays, many Brazilians are opting for Chester, a pumped-up chicken that costs less than turkey and has more meat than a standard chicken."
http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/10632/move-over-tu...

Catharine Cellier-Smart
Reunion
Local time: 02:32
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  airmailrpl: -
10 mins
  -> thank you !

agree  Filippe Vasconcellos de Freitas Guimarães
3 hrs
  -> thank you !

agree  Polangmar
8 hrs
  -> thank you !
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
chester turkey
a "Chester"


Explanation:
It sounds as if it isn't actually a turkey, but a variety of chicken: http://www.thepoultrysite.com/poultrynews/10632/move-over-tu...

Chester is the name of the variety, so it doesn't matter whether it is referring to the city, to someone's surname or whatever. "Perdigao", who developed the genetic variety, gave it this name.

It is also a trade name, and therefore should be left unaltered.

If you are unhappy about whether to call it a chicken or a turkey, then you could just opt for "bird" or nothing at all, as I have done.

"Perdigao S/A Comércio, along with its two main operating companies, Perdigao Alimentos S/A and Perdigao Agroindustrial S/A, went public in 1980, listing on the Brazil stock exchange. The following year, Perdigao began marketing a new poultry brand, Chester, after the company's research and development team had succeeded in breeding a chicken that concentrated 70 percent of its meat in its breast and thigh portions. The Chester brand was then expanded in 1982 to include low-fat products. " http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/Perdigao-SA...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 19 mins (2010-09-14 10:23:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Definitely a chicken: http://www.chester.com.br/ The Perdigao company sells many pre-prepared chickens, and the main ingredient is listed as "Special chicken (frango special)".

As Tony points out, the brand seems to be v popular in Brazil, but I can't find references outside. There is a chain of fast food chicken outlets called Chester, but I don't think they are connected.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2010-09-14 10:24:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, hadn't seen your note below until now:

I would use "a Chester chicken" then.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2010-09-14 11:36:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Re your second note: OK!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2010-09-14 16:13:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I think turkey is an inaccuracy

Fiona Gilbert Riley
Spain
Local time: 00:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you.
Notes to answerer
Asker: I think I will call it "Chicken Chester". I must put something before this name. I hope it does not sound funny :)

Asker: I wrote how I would express it in Polish as we usually have to put something before such names because in Polish there is declination and we have different case forms.

Asker: I just wonder why they call it "turkey". Most of these recipes are from asian countries like China, India, Korea. Is it possible that it is a breed of turkey known locally in England?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Seems to be very specific to Brazil, so it might help to know where this recipe comes from? And lots of sites seem to use it on its own, as you have done.
4 mins
  -> Thanks Tony

agree  airmailrpl: -
11 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Jack Doughty
1 hr
  -> Thanks Jack

agree  Alexandra Taggart: "Chester turkey" indeed comes from Chester, it's a rare breed ( so called "heritage breed") /I think yes! In a sense of its rarity!You wouldn't find another turkey like this!
2 hrs
  -> But I think we agree this is not likely to be that breed?

agree  Filippe Vasconcellos de Freitas Guimarães: Yes indeed. Bred and usually force-fed to have 70-80% breast and leg meat.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks.

agree  Polangmar
8 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Phong Le
1 day 22 hrs
  -> Thank you
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