(Hons)

English translation: honors

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:(Hons)
English translation:honors
Entered by: Michael Powers (PhD)

22:44 Apr 26, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Education / Pedagogy
English term or phrase: (Hons)
appears after name of member of a company of London architects, eg, Mr. Brian Suchandsuch BA (Hons) BArch (Dist) RIBA
while we're at it, any tips re that (Dist) bit?
pidzej
Poland
Local time: 15:52
honors
Explanation:
He graduated with Honors while earning his BA - Mike :)
Selected response from:

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 09:52
Grading comment
thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +14honors
Michael Powers (PhD)
5 +11Honours, with Distinction
NancyLynn
4 +4honours, but don't be misled
Charlie Bavington (X)


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +14
(hons)
honors


Explanation:
He graduated with Honors while earning his BA - Mike :)

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 09:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  rangepost
1 min
  -> Thank you, rangepost - Mike :)

agree  Robert Donahue (X): (Dist) is most likely With Distinction, following Michael's logic (which I have zero room to doubt).
2 mins
  -> Thank you, Robert - Mike :)

agree  Will Matter
3 mins
  -> Thank you, willmatter - Mike :)

agree  NancyLynn: ha! Robert and I must have been typing at the same time ;-)
4 mins
  -> Thank you, NancyLynn - Mike :)

agree  RebeW
28 mins
  -> Thank you, RebeW - Mike :)

agree  sarahl (X)
50 mins
  -> Thank you, sarahl - Mike :)

agree  Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com (X): an honourable answer
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Anna Maria - that is quite an honour, one with distinction, one with gold and platinum metals, one with ... - Mike :)

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
1 hr

agree  Java Cafe
2 hrs

agree  Mihaela Brooks
2 hrs

agree  Can Altinbay
3 hrs

agree  Alp Berker
4 hrs

agree  Michael Bailey: yes, but with hono*u*rs
8 hrs

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
3 days 12 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +11
(hons)
Honours, with Distinction


Explanation:
Not to take away from Michael's answer - his is the American spelling
:-)

NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 09:52
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Will Matter
0 min

agree  silvia b (X)
3 mins

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
1 hr

agree  verbis
1 hr

agree  Can Altinbay
3 hrs

agree  Alp Berker
4 hrs

agree  mportal
7 hrs

agree  Michael Bailey
8 hrs

agree  Kristina Thorne
10 hrs

agree  Amy Williams
15 hrs

agree  juvera
17 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
(hons)
honours, but don't be misled


Explanation:
If the guy graduated from a English or Welsh university (and he IS in London, so maybe...?) , then while "honours" is what "(hons)" means, do not be misled into thinking the guy is exceptionally talented.
The way it works is that BA (batchelor of arts, but is only to differentiate from BSc batchelor of science; it doesn't mean much - see later) degrees are broken down thus, roughly, according to your marks in the examinations:
70% - 1st class honours
65-70 - 2:1 - 2nd class honours
60-65 - 2:2 - 2nd class honours
55-60 - 3rd class honours
50+ % - ordinary degree

So, if you got above an ordinary degree, you get to put "BA (Hons)" after your name (as I could, if I chose to do so). As you can tell from the above, it could mean you got as little as 55% or so in your exams. Not the mark of a genius, then. (
Unlike the Dist in the BArch, which possibly is :-) )

BA doesn't have to be very "arts" based. I got a BA, and shared a lot of course content with people doing a BSc; the main difference was that my course had a language element and theirs didn't.

Charlie Bavington (X)
Local time: 14:52
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  NancyLynn: at my alma mater, the U of Ottawa, a general BA is done in 3 yrs and an Honours one is done in 4; you need an Honours BA to go onto a Master's program
15 mins

agree  Michael Bailey: incidentally it is "Bachelor" (no T - with a T it is a brand of cup-a-soup) - One thing to note though is that some Unis - I take St Andrews as a case in point use the 70 for a first benchmark, but it is 70/80...
7 hrs

agree  tappi_k: with Nancy above - in Britain you can do a general degree in 3 years, then you can decide to continue onto the 4th year to do an honours degree, which most students today do.
11 hrs

agree  Amy Williams
13 hrs
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