to barrio or not to barrio?

English translation: Translate it

08:46 Feb 23, 2018
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Education / Pedagogy / School performance and academic outcomes
English term or phrase: to barrio or not to barrio?
Bit of a straw poll here. I'm translating an ES-EN text (Spain, Europe), which will be submitted for publication to either a European or North American publication, and I'm wondering if nowadays it's okay to just leave "barrio" as is, or if I should italicise it, or whether I should just dump it and use a translation.

These are the options I'm considering so far:

1.- "The school is located in a barrio with one of the lowest socio-economic and cultural levels in western Andalusia."

2.- "The school is located in an area (barrio) with one of the lowest socio-economic and cultural levels in western Andalusia."

3.- "The school is located in an area/district/neighbourhood with one of the lowest socio-economic and cultural levels in western Andalusia"
neilmac
Spain
Local time: 18:58
English translation:Translate it
Explanation:
I can't see any good argument for not translating it. To me it's a perfectly ordinary word that is no more culturally specific than many others that we routinely translate. Terms should only be left in the original language, as a rule, if an important aspect of their meaning simply can't be reflected in any English term, but that's not the case here. I would only leave it in Spanish if there is some strong reason for reflecting the Hispanic connotations of the particular neighbourhood or area. This might be the case in Hispanic areas of US cities, for example. But in Western Andalusia, it's simply a neighbourhood or area of a city, and you should use the same word you would use if it were talking about the UK or the US. There are several standard translations, which you've mentioned in option 3. One of them would do fine, in my opinion.

Just before pressing the button I've seen the latest comment. I don't think "barrio" is a distinctively Hispanic concept at all (though it might be in certain specific contexts, in a text for a particular readership, as I've suggested). It's simply the Spanish word for an area of a city or a quarter or a neighbourhood.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 18:58
Grading comment
Went with "neighbourhood" in the end. Thanks to everyone for the comments and suggestions :-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7Translate it
Charles Davis
4barrio (+translation)
Daryo


Discussion entries: 10





  

Answers


2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
Translate it


Explanation:
I can't see any good argument for not translating it. To me it's a perfectly ordinary word that is no more culturally specific than many others that we routinely translate. Terms should only be left in the original language, as a rule, if an important aspect of their meaning simply can't be reflected in any English term, but that's not the case here. I would only leave it in Spanish if there is some strong reason for reflecting the Hispanic connotations of the particular neighbourhood or area. This might be the case in Hispanic areas of US cities, for example. But in Western Andalusia, it's simply a neighbourhood or area of a city, and you should use the same word you would use if it were talking about the UK or the US. There are several standard translations, which you've mentioned in option 3. One of them would do fine, in my opinion.

Just before pressing the button I've seen the latest comment. I don't think "barrio" is a distinctively Hispanic concept at all (though it might be in certain specific contexts, in a text for a particular readership, as I've suggested). It's simply the Spanish word for an area of a city or a quarter or a neighbourhood.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 18:58
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Went with "neighbourhood" in the end. Thanks to everyone for the comments and suggestions :-)
Notes to answerer
Asker: And in Valencia, when we say "the barrio", it usually means the Carmen... :)


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Björn Vrooman: That's in line with what I was thinking. Also, I don't know what style guide Neil is using, but AP doesn't like brackets/parentheses. Usually, you have to remove tons of them from documents written in German.
15 mins
  -> Thanks, Björn! The AP is rather capricious in its tastes, I feel. I would be very reluctant to do without brackets/parentheses entirely, though they can certainly be overused.

agree  EdithK
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, Edith!

agree  Andy Watkinson
3 hrs
  -> Cheers, Andy :-)

agree  Jessie LN
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Jessie :-)

agree  lorenab23: Spanish word for an area of a city ;-)
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, Lorena :-) Exactly!

agree  Rachel Fell: as in, most English speakers probably don't know or understand the meaning of the word for Spain
1 day 11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rachel :-) // Yes, quite, and it's difficult to give an answer to this question without a knowledge of Spanish and Spanish-speaking countries, otherwise how can you tell whether it can or should be translated?

agree  acetran
9 days
  -> Thanks, acetran :-)
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
barrio (+translation)


Explanation:
call it a personal preference, or just instinct - I would leave it as is. And add a translation the first time it's used.

Daryo
United Kingdom
Local time: 17:58
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in FrenchFrench
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