peeled insulation

English translation: insulation that has been made thinner

22:07 Jun 9, 2015
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Electronics / Elect Eng
English term or phrase: peeled insulation
I am translating a set of instructions on installing an outdoor cable termination. At one of the stages of installation work you need to ‘’peel’’ insulation of your cable. I’ve posted the instruction text here:
http://s15.postimg.org/6acpfkbbf/peeled_insulation.jpg
because I want you to see the picture.
Now, does the phrase ‘’peeled insulation’’ in 4.3.1 mean ‘’insulation that’s been removed completely’’ or ‘’insulation made thinner’’?
I have difficulty understanding ‘’not be smaller than 1.0 mm below the measured diameter’’. Is it this sentence grammatical?

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Grzegorz Mysiński
Poland
Local time: 07:17
Selected answer:insulation that has been made thinner
Explanation:
This seems to be a US text? I must say, in EN-GB, I wold be surprised to read 'peel' here, which to me too would imply 'removed completely' (cf. peel a banana)

But the description, diagram, and logic of your text all make it clear that it does indeed mean 'to reduce the diameter of' — or 'thickness' as you say.

I would more naturally have called that 'paring' (to pare down the diameter) — though this is quite a tricky thing to do, unless you have some special kind of tool to do it with!

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Note added at 12 heures (2015-06-10 11:00:03 GMT)
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Ah, Asker, that explains it then! Dunglish strikes again!
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 07:17
Grading comment
Thanks again, Tony!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +4insulation that has been made thinner
Tony M


  

Answers


32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
insulation that has been made thinner


Explanation:
This seems to be a US text? I must say, in EN-GB, I wold be surprised to read 'peel' here, which to me too would imply 'removed completely' (cf. peel a banana)

But the description, diagram, and logic of your text all make it clear that it does indeed mean 'to reduce the diameter of' — or 'thickness' as you say.

I would more naturally have called that 'paring' (to pare down the diameter) — though this is quite a tricky thing to do, unless you have some special kind of tool to do it with!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 heures (2015-06-10 11:00:03 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ah, Asker, that explains it then! Dunglish strikes again!

Tony M
France
Local time: 07:17
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 304
Grading comment
Thanks again, Tony!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you very much, Tony. This document was produced by the Dutch branch of a multinational cable manufacturer.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  danya: an interesting note on usage! I think they mean both - for some of the length, making ot thinner, and for some removing it altogether
4 mins
  -> Thanks, Danya!

agree  Alok Tiwari
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alok!

agree  Henk Sanderson
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Henk!

agree  B D Finch: Agree that this is not normal usage of the term "peel" for EN-UK.
12 hrs
  -> Thanks, B! :-)
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