burn-in / burning

English translation: burn in

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09:43 Nov 30, 2006
English to English translations [PRO]
Science - Electronics / Elect Eng / Electronics
English term or phrase: burn-in / burning
Hi,
I've seen in manuals etc both term to refer to a long term test of electronic components: burn-in test and burning test. Are both correct? I always thoguht "burning" test is wrong unless you actually set fire to the equipment ;)
Thanks a lot
owix
Local time: 00:26
English translation:burn in
Explanation:
It should normally be 'burn-in', I expect tha confusion arises when people say 'burning-in' (equally correct), and then they get tied up with too many 'ins', and so drop one, which is NOT correct; also, a simple transcription error of 'burning' for 'burn-in' (sound the same in sloppy / regional pronunciation)


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Note added at 12 mins (2006-11-30 09:55:31 GMT)
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An argument might be made that for a 'burn-in test', you would leave the unit 'burning (in)' for a certain period of time, hence adding to the confusion.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 00:26
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, perect explanations
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7burn in
Tony M


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
burn in


Explanation:
It should normally be 'burn-in', I expect tha confusion arises when people say 'burning-in' (equally correct), and then they get tied up with too many 'ins', and so drop one, which is NOT correct; also, a simple transcription error of 'burning' for 'burn-in' (sound the same in sloppy / regional pronunciation)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 12 mins (2006-11-30 09:55:31 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

An argument might be made that for a 'burn-in test', you would leave the unit 'burning (in)' for a certain period of time, hence adding to the confusion.

Tony M
France
Local time: 00:26
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 300
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, perect explanations

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ken Cox: yep -- IMO 'burning' is casual colloqial usage (possibly with mildly humorous intent) or mistaken usage, depending on the context.
40 mins
  -> Thanks, Ken! Well put!

agree  William [Bill] Gray: Sounds like a very good explanation from both Tony and Ken.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Bill! Ken is always so much more succinct than I...

agree  Ex-True: By all I've seen from Tony he's a person you can count on his explanations. Regards
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, colleague, for the glowing compliment! I do TRY my best to only speak from personal experience/knowledge, but I'm just as fallible as the next person!

agree  airmailrpl: We software engineers are familiar with the term "smoke test":..http://www.nedbatchelder.com/blog/20030408T062805.html
3 hrs
  -> Thanks; airmailrpl! Oh dear me yes, even 'hardware engineers' like myself are used to THOSE! Look on the bright side: it's easier to mend if you can see which bit's burnt! ;-)))

agree  jccantrell: Unless you are testing the Nomex coating on the PCB!
5 hrs
  -> Thanks, JCC! Oh dear me, yes indeed!

agree  webguru
14 hrs
  -> Thanks, Webguru!

agree  Hakki Ucar: Good stuff, I used to saying warm up time for lighter version of this explanation.
23 hrs
  -> Thanks, Xramm! Really and truly, 'wram-up' and 'burn-in' are not quite the same thing...
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