€ 10.000,000

English translation: official and unofficial use vary

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:€ 10.000,000
English translation:official and unofficial use vary
Entered by: Jonathan MacKerron

06:45 Jun 21, 2007
English to English translations [PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general)
English term or phrase: € 10.000,000
is there an agreed way of putting this?
ten million euro/euros/Euro/Euros...

Thanks for your input
Jonathan MacKerron
official and unofficial use vary
Explanation:
Official EU recommendation is "euro," i.e., lowercase e and no plural. However, most people tend to say "euros" aloud, and many news sources write "euros." Using capital E is definitely wrong.

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Note added at 9 mins (2007-06-21 06:54:29 GMT)
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistic_issues_concerning_th...

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Note added at 9 mins (2007-06-21 06:54:55 GMT)
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"differ," I mean, not really "vary"
Selected response from:

Andrew Levine
United States
Local time: 23:45
Grading comment
Many thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +13official and unofficial use vary
Andrew Levine


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +13
official and unofficial use vary


Explanation:
Official EU recommendation is "euro," i.e., lowercase e and no plural. However, most people tend to say "euros" aloud, and many news sources write "euros." Using capital E is definitely wrong.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2007-06-21 06:54:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linguistic_issues_concerning_th...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2007-06-21 06:54:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"differ," I mean, not really "vary"

Andrew Levine
United States
Local time: 23:45
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Many thanks
Notes to answerer
Asker: thanks for your quick response


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Monika Silea: well, Cambridge, Oxford and Merriam-Webster's dictionaries use currency names in lower case; as for the plural, we do have *dollars*, don't we?
4 mins

agree  Jack Doughty
15 mins

agree  Melzie
46 mins

agree  Angie Garbarino: yes euro
2 hrs

agree  Elena Aleksandrova
3 hrs

agree  R-i-c-h-a-r-d
5 hrs

agree  Anton Baer: I would suggest English language rules override EU-speak : 'euros', not 'euro'. (Sounds French.)
6 hrs

agree  Lubosh Hanuska
6 hrs

agree  Caroline Moreno: euro
8 hrs

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
11 hrs

agree  Cilian O'Tuama: euros (IMO, just as a native of the only English-speaking country to have this currency) (But J, the point should be a comma!)
15 hrs

agree  Pham Huu Phuoc
1 day 1 hr

agree  Sophia Finos (X)
2 days 16 hrs
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