checking account

English translation: I´d keep it the same

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05:35 Jan 18, 2003
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
Bus/Financial - Finance (general) / banking
English term or phrase: checking account
I know what this is, but I don't know if the expression is applicable in case of eBanking accounts or shall I use rather something trendy, like "cash management account"?
Thanks is advance, Eva
Eva Blanar
Hungary
Local time: 18:49
English translation:I´d keep it the same
Explanation:
I don´t think I went to my bank all last year, I do all my banking online. But my main account is still my Girokonto, just as it always has been.

Keeping it the same keeps it clear, otherwise there is the question of whether the new name means a new kind of account. They probably even still have checkbooks.

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Note added at 2003-01-18 15:12:16 (GMT)
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Regarding Peter´s point below about \"checking account\" for an English audience, I agree completely - \"Uh what´s that?\" My recommendation is to keep it the same as it is.

As I said, I had a \"Girokonto\" with my German bank, and still have. I also have a \"current account\" with an English bank, and still have. I would not be keen on either of these banks changing the name of the account just because I administer it over the Internet. If they change the name, it makes me think they have changed the rules, and then I want to know how and why and why didn´t they ask me or at least tell me.

And if it´s a new bank being set up, I would use something traditional (for the area, and type of account), because they will want to reassure the large number of potential customers who are cautious about entrusting their money to new techniques.
Selected response from:

Chris Rowson
Local time: 18:49
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, to all of you, that gave me lots of insight into "customer views", too! :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +11I´d keep it the same
Chris Rowson
5 +2Depends on your audience
Peter Coles
5 +1Just checking...
LaCat


  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +11
I´d keep it the same


Explanation:
I don´t think I went to my bank all last year, I do all my banking online. But my main account is still my Girokonto, just as it always has been.

Keeping it the same keeps it clear, otherwise there is the question of whether the new name means a new kind of account. They probably even still have checkbooks.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-18 15:12:16 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Regarding Peter´s point below about \"checking account\" for an English audience, I agree completely - \"Uh what´s that?\" My recommendation is to keep it the same as it is.

As I said, I had a \"Girokonto\" with my German bank, and still have. I also have a \"current account\" with an English bank, and still have. I would not be keen on either of these banks changing the name of the account just because I administer it over the Internet. If they change the name, it makes me think they have changed the rules, and then I want to know how and why and why didn´t they ask me or at least tell me.

And if it´s a new bank being set up, I would use something traditional (for the area, and type of account), because they will want to reassure the large number of potential customers who are cautious about entrusting their money to new techniques.

Chris Rowson
Local time: 18:49
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, to all of you, that gave me lots of insight into "customer views", too! :)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LaCat
2 mins

agree  Edward L. Crosby III: I think a checking account is still a checking account even if you move money in and out of it "virtually".
3 mins

agree  Herman Vilella: Giugliermo di Occam (see the novel - and movie - "The name of the rose" - states: it is not convenient to multiply explanations and causes as long as it's not strictly necessary".
41 mins
  -> Right! Essentia non sunt multiplicanda praeter necessitatem. My countryman William. - an excellent systems designer.

agree  Fuad Yahya
2 hrs

agree  Marie Scarano
2 hrs

agree  Paula Ibbotson
3 hrs

agree  TonyTK: Sad to say - there are almost 1,000 hits for ' "checking account" site:uk '
6 hrs

agree  NancyLynn
6 hrs

agree  Kozeta Elzhenni
20 hrs

agree  María Alejandra Funes
1 day 10 hrs

agree  Shog Imas
1 day 21 hrs
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Just checking...


Explanation:
I would go with the good ole checking account. I'm personally not a big fan of trendy, gilded names for simple things.
If I were on a banking site and saw something like "cash management account", I would wonder what in the hell and move on to a spot where they had simply "checking". Good luck and I hope my neuroses could help!

LaCat

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Edward L. Crosby III
2 mins
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Depends on your audience


Explanation:
If your audience is American, or familar with US banking products then Chris's advice above is the right way to go.

However, the term 'checking account' is not universally understand by English-speakers. Most Brits have no idea what it means since they don't use 'checks' they use 'cheques' and on the increasingly rare occasions that they use them, they draw them on their 'current account'.

I'd advise against 'cash management account'. To me as an ex-banker this implies an account with reduced transactional facilities and enhanced interest rates.

Peter Coles
Local time: 17:49
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Nikki Graham
3 mins

agree  xxxcmwilliams
1 hr
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