the middle of nowhere

English translation: the back of beyond.

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:the middle of nowhere
Selected answer:the back of beyond.
Entered by: Jack Doughty

11:35 Apr 19, 2006
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Folklore / Proverbs
English term or phrase: the middle of nowhere
I'm looking for a proverbial/metaphorical way of calling a place "the middle of nowhere" in English, especially one that's connected with folklore and would be understandable to a casual English speaker.

I'm particularily interested in phrases that somehow relate to the very likeable character commonly referred to as "the Devil", since there's wordplay involved. There's a Polish saying which literally would mean "Where the devil says good-night", but I guess it'd be a new creation.

Thanks in advance,
PSz
Przemysław Szkodziński
Poland
Local time: 16:48
the back of beyond.
Explanation:
Can't think of one directly connected to the Devil, but for a reference to his opposite number, you might call it:
"Some God-forsaken hole".

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Note added at 17 mins (2006-04-19 11:53:14 GMT)
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An American one: "the boondocks".

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Note added at 20 mins (2006-04-19 11:56:37 GMT)
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And an Australian one:
"beyond the black stump"
http://www.abc.net.au/queensland/heritage/stories/s680695.ht...
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:48
Grading comment
Thanks for the suggestion, I think I'll manage to come up with something suitable using it. Oh, and I like the sound of the 'back of beyond' phrase.
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +4the back of beyond.
Jack Doughty
4Far Far Away.
Morad Safe (X)
4the sticks
Natalie Wilcock (X)
3If you want a rather rude version...
John Bowden
3East Jesus
Joanna Borowska


  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
the sticks


Explanation:
The middle of nowhere is often also called the sticks as in "to be out in the sticks"...
You might be able to work with that if it's an English word you are looking for. Shame I can't understand what 'bartek' replied... ;-))

Natalie Wilcock (X)
Local time: 16:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
the back of beyond.


Explanation:
Can't think of one directly connected to the Devil, but for a reference to his opposite number, you might call it:
"Some God-forsaken hole".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 mins (2006-04-19 11:53:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

An American one: "the boondocks".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 mins (2006-04-19 11:56:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

And an Australian one:
"beyond the black stump"
http://www.abc.net.au/queensland/heritage/stories/s680695.ht...

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 15:48
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 3
Grading comment
Thanks for the suggestion, I think I'll manage to come up with something suitable using it. Oh, and I like the sound of the 'back of beyond' phrase.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ensor: 'godforsaken place', or 'hole', that's what crossed my mind as well;
17 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  cmwilliams (X): good suggestions
24 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Mihailolja: The Greeks say "at the Devil's mother" !
53 mins
  -> Thank you.

agree  Alison Jenner: "godforsaken hole" was my first thought too
1 hr
  -> Thank you.
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29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
East Jesus


Explanation:
That's the phrase I know. Hope it's helpful :o)

East Jesus: A very distant location out in the sticks, with the implication that it's not terribly civilized.
Example: He lives way out in East Jesus!
http://www.slangsite.com/slang/E.html

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Note added at 47 mins (2006-04-19 12:23:27 GMT)
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I checked Maciej Widawski's Dictionary of English Slang and among the numerous synonyms for "the middle of nowhere" he includes a "hellhole." As you're looking for something connected to the Devil, maybe this would be appropriate?

Joanna Borowska
Poland
Local time: 16:48
Native speaker of: Polish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Far Far Away.


Explanation:
...

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Note added at 2 hrs (2006-04-19 13:37:30 GMT)
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As the Funa`s paternal land placed in Shreck 2.

Morad Safe (X)
Local time: 19:18
Native speaker of: Native in Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian)
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
If you want a rather rude version...


Explanation:
Dante called the entrance to Hell "The Devil's Arsehole", and there are a few places in Great Britain with this name - e.g. the Peak Cavern in Derbyshire, and a place in North Wales - this is reminiscent of calling "Godforsaken" places "The arsehole/armpit of the world", which is aquite a common expression...


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Note added at 2006-04-19 14:41:12 (GMT)
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There\'s a place in Kerry, Ireland, called \"The Devil\'s Armpit\" (http://www.lakehotel.com/walking.htm), and various places (Phoenix Arizona, Tampa Florida, valdosta Georgia...) seem to be known as this as well...



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Note added at 2006-04-19 14:44:59 (GMT)
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There\'s a place in Kerry, Ireland, called \"The Devil\'s Armpit\" (http://www.lakehotel.com/walking.htm), and various places (Phoenix Arizona, Tampa Florida, valdosta Georgia...) seem to be known as this as well...



John Bowden
Local time: 15:48
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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