a lolly

English translation: nasty, ugly

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:a lolly
Selected answer:nasty, ugly

15:08 Nov 26, 2006
English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
Medical - Folklore
English term or phrase: a lolly
My friend found himself in an emergecy room at a hospital in the Dutch Antilles. He fell down a few steps and tore a tendent in his knee. The doctor at the ER used the term "You have a lally injurie".
Being that my friend was in Dutch culture. What does a Lolly or Lally mean?
M.F.L
mikelal
nasty, ugly
Explanation:
If the doctor's English was so poor that he used a mixture of Dutch and English, he might have used the Dutch adjective lelijk, which means 'ugly' or 'nasty' (in the sense of a nasty wound). It could sound like 'lellie' if pronounced with a 'soft' accent.

This is obviously pure guesswork.
Selected response from:

Ken Cox
Local time: 07:41
Grading comment
I am inclined to think that your first answear fits the bill...British. slang for leg.
Thank you very much. M.F.L.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
2 +1lally
Christina Keating (X)
1 +1nasty, ugly
Ken Cox


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lally


Explanation:
Lally is from a British slang called Polari. It means "leg."

Christina Keating (X)
United States
Local time: 00:41
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dave Calderhead: gay slang, as popularised in the 60's UK radio shows 'Beyond our Ken' and 'Round the Horne' by the gay characters Julian and Sandy, portrayed by Kenneth Williams and Hugh Paddick
5 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lolly
nasty, ugly


Explanation:
If the doctor's English was so poor that he used a mixture of Dutch and English, he might have used the Dutch adjective lelijk, which means 'ugly' or 'nasty' (in the sense of a nasty wound). It could sound like 'lellie' if pronounced with a 'soft' accent.

This is obviously pure guesswork.

Ken Cox
Local time: 07:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
I am inclined to think that your first answear fits the bill...British. slang for leg.
Thank you very much. M.F.L.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alfa Trans (X)
22 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search