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ebroidered peasant blouse

English translation: smocking

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:embroidered peasant blouse
Selected answer:smocking
Entered by: Rachel Fell

16:47 Jan 15, 2009
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Art/Literary - Folklore / ethnography
English term or phrase: ebroidered peasant blouse
How would you call the technique used at sewing the collar of an embroidered peasant blouse as seen in the image?
http://www.cimec.ro/scripts/PCN/clasate/detaliu.asp?k=E19DBC...
(=the red trapezoidal shape)
adinag
Local time: 21:53
embroidered smocking
Explanation:
I would probably avoid "English" for a patently non-English design, even if the method may be known as that elsewhere.
"embroidered smocking" is accurately descriptive at least

Silk-chiffon blouse with mandarin collar and 8-button closure at front. Embroidered smocking at bib, back, and shoulders. 1.5" banding, ruching, and single-button closure at cuffs. Long sleeves.
http://www.shopbop.com/jewel-smocking-blouse-anna-sui/vp/v=1...

Brown Bebe Dress made from very fine wool challis, with embroidered smocking on bodice insert and sleeve cuffs. T
http://www.rubylane.com/shops/joysdolls/item/DC-JM733

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Note added at 17 hrs (2009-01-16 09:56:16 GMT)
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Smocking is an embroidery technique used to gather fabric so that it can stretch. Before elastic, smocking was commonly used in cuffs, bodices, and necklines in garments where buttons were undesirable. Smocking developed in England and has been practiced since the Middle Ages and is unusual among embroidery methods in that it was often worn by laborers. Other major embroidery styles are purely decorative and represented status symbols. Smocking was practical for garments to be both form fitting and flexible, hence its name derives from smock — a farmer's work shirt.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smocking

plenty of smocking here:
http://www.handsmocking.co.uk/
Selected response from:

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:53
Grading comment
thank you very much.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +4embroidered smocking
Rachel Fell
3 +2English smocking
lindaellen (X)


Discussion entries: 10





  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
English smocking


Explanation:
As far as I can tell from the picture, the embroidery is sewn over smocking, and this is called "English smocking". I don't think it is a good solution for Romanian textiles, so I would go around it call it "elaborate embroidery over smocking". Smocking is the technique of pulling the material together to from the neckline. See the Wiki article and the 2nd website for more details.


Variations of Smocking from Wiki:
Typically, variations are done as an art form on clothing or on fabric which is mounted in picture frames for hanging on the wall.

English smocking is a historic technique of sewing the embroidery over pleats already sewn into the fabric.
North American smocking is an alternate technique in which the pleats are gathered and formed in the fabric by the smocking stitch-work itself.
Lattice smocking involves stitching from the back side of the fabric, creating unique effects in the pleats and appearance, and is particularly good for heavier fabrics like velvet.



    Reference: http://www.smockingstore.com/what.html
lindaellen (X)
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Arcoiris: I would just go for embroidery over smocking
40 mins

agree  Phong Le
10 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
embroidered smocking


Explanation:
I would probably avoid "English" for a patently non-English design, even if the method may be known as that elsewhere.
"embroidered smocking" is accurately descriptive at least

Silk-chiffon blouse with mandarin collar and 8-button closure at front. Embroidered smocking at bib, back, and shoulders. 1.5" banding, ruching, and single-button closure at cuffs. Long sleeves.
http://www.shopbop.com/jewel-smocking-blouse-anna-sui/vp/v=1...

Brown Bebe Dress made from very fine wool challis, with embroidered smocking on bodice insert and sleeve cuffs. T
http://www.rubylane.com/shops/joysdolls/item/DC-JM733

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2009-01-16 09:56:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Smocking is an embroidery technique used to gather fabric so that it can stretch. Before elastic, smocking was commonly used in cuffs, bodices, and necklines in garments where buttons were undesirable. Smocking developed in England and has been practiced since the Middle Ages and is unusual among embroidery methods in that it was often worn by laborers. Other major embroidery styles are purely decorative and represented status symbols. Smocking was practical for garments to be both form fitting and flexible, hence its name derives from smock — a farmer's work shirt.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smocking

plenty of smocking here:
http://www.handsmocking.co.uk/

Rachel Fell
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:53
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thank you very much.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Shera Lyn Parpia
5 hrs
  -> Thank you Shera:-)

agree  juvera: The technique is not generally known as "English" elsewhere.
13 hrs
  -> Thank you juvera:-)

agree  Gary D: here it is called just smocking.. My mum is a dressmaker (Seamstress)
1 day 4 hrs
  -> Thank you Gary - yes, the only time I've ever done any, it was stitched on top too but not called embroidered, just smocking :-)

agree  Claire Chapman: w/Gary D, just smocking :-)
2 days 18 hrs
  -> Yes, thank you Claire :-)
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