sup spot

English translation: place to eat / eatery

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:sup spot
Selected answer:place to eat / eatery
Entered by: Tony M

09:23 Nov 15, 2015
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Art/Literary - Food & Drink / culinary Chicago
English term or phrase: sup spot
In competitively culinary Chicago, new venues come and go faster than courses at a degustation, but one dining dream team has an unrivalled reputation for serving up red hot sup spots that stand the test of time.
Ivan Niu
China
Local time: 07:23
place to eat
Explanation:
'to sup' is a now-archaic word for 'to eat', and only really survives in 'supper' and a few dedicated expressions.

A 'spot' suggests a specific, desirable venue (cf. nightspot), so the expression 'sup spot' has more 'marketing appeal' to it than the bland 'place to eat'.

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Note added at 5 minutes (2015-11-15 09:28:46 GMT)
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Can't say I like the expression, but at least it makes a change from the over-used 'eatery'!

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Note added at 1 heure (2015-11-15 10:46:34 GMT)
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Immediately reminded me of the lyrics of a sing from "Yeaomen of the Guard" by Gillbert & Sullivan, which includes the lines:

"...
Whose soul was sad, and whose glance was glum,
Who sipped no sup, and who craved no crumb,
As he sighed for the love of a ladye.
..."
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 00:23
Grading comment
Thanks, Tony!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +9place to eat
Tony M


  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +9
place to eat


Explanation:
'to sup' is a now-archaic word for 'to eat', and only really survives in 'supper' and a few dedicated expressions.

A 'spot' suggests a specific, desirable venue (cf. nightspot), so the expression 'sup spot' has more 'marketing appeal' to it than the bland 'place to eat'.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 minutes (2015-11-15 09:28:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Can't say I like the expression, but at least it makes a change from the over-used 'eatery'!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 heure (2015-11-15 10:46:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Immediately reminded me of the lyrics of a sing from "Yeaomen of the Guard" by Gillbert & Sullivan, which includes the lines:

"...
Whose soul was sad, and whose glance was glum,
Who sipped no sup, and who craved no crumb,
As he sighed for the love of a ladye.
..."

Tony M
France
Local time: 00:23
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Thanks, Tony!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  BrigitteHilgner: I wouldn't want to eat in a sup spot! (Okay, I'm difficult.) ;-)
56 mins
  -> Thanks, Brigitte! Me neither — sounds like some medical slang for a 'suppurating spot'! But typical American neologism, let's hope it dies a rapid death!

agree  Sheila Wilson: Horrible term. BTW, don't forget you still hear "sup it up, lad" etc. Yorkshire perhaps?
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Sheila! Yes, "sup up, lad" is one of the very few set expressions I could think of. But as you say, now primarily regional dialect, I believe.

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, G!

agree  Shera Lyn Parpia
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Shera!

agree  Sheri P
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Sheri!

agree  jccantrell
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, J-C!

agree  B D Finch: According to Collins (I checked because I thought "to sup" was to drink, especially to drink slowly), the archaic meaning is eat or give supper, while the meaning I remembered is current in the North and Scotland.
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, B! Good research! Certainly the G&S version refers to drinking, as does I think the "sup up, lad" quote Sheile and I recalled (again, northern).

agree  Jörgen Slet
15 hrs
  -> Thanks, Jörgen!

agree  Björn Vrooman: Immediately reminded me of "souped up" - a term that is not dated, but still somewhat awkward - considering you got the image of soup in your head. // I see: They confused Chicago with Detroit, and it's actually a red hot rod :)
1 day 8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Björn! Ah yes... perhaps it's a car tuning workshop ;-)
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