6 quardrant

English translation: 6 sectors

10:50 Apr 6, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink / cake
English term or phrase: 6 quardrant
Top must have 6 quadrant symmetrical design

This is describing cake display. What is 6 qyadrant?? I thought quardrant is one forth of the circle. My husband and I had an argument over quardrant. Can it be square??
Please someone help...
Kaori Myatt
France
Local time: 23:39
English translation:6 sectors
Explanation:
Assuming that this is indeed a ROUND cake (the only logical assumption I can make), I feel sure it just means 'divided/marked out into 6 equal SECTORS' --- please note that, strictly speaking, these are NOT 'segments', even though they are often loosely called that in everyday parlance. Here's the applicable OED definition of sector:

"A plane figure contained by two radii and an arc of a circle... which they intercept."

Note that (unlike in English) in French, the term 'quadrant' IS sometimes used (inaccurately IMO) to describe a sector other than an exact quarter of a circle.

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Note added at 43 mins (2005-04-06 11:33:56 GMT)
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I agree that the technically-correct term \'sector\' is relatively uncommon in everyday language, but be that as it may, \'quadrant\' is less \'correct\' --- by its very etymology, it means \' a quarter of something\', and should not ever be used, even very sloppily, to refer to a sector-shape that is other than a quarter-circle. See the applicable OED definition for \'quadrant\':

\"A plane figure bounded by two radii of a circle AT RIGHT ANGLES and the arc cut off by them\"


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2005-04-06 11:36:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here\'s a ref. mentioning sectors in an illustrative fashion --- though note that the \'cake\' here is referring to a pie chart, not a REAL cake (pity!):

Oral presentations: 7. Tips for Visualization

No more than 3 columns in column diagrams. At most 6 sectors in cake diagrams ...

www.techfak.uni-kiel.de/matwis/amat/elmat_en/kap_1/advanced...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 56 mins (2005-04-06 11:47:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I agree that in everyday language, \'sector\' is unusual, and at best we often (incorrectly) find \'segment\'. But this context seems to be some kind of formal rules or specification, in which case I feel it is entirely appropriate to use the technically accurate and totally unambiguous term \'sector\':

\"Top must have a symmetrical design of 6 equal sectors\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 21 mins (2005-04-06 12:12:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Not necessarily the SAME (though that would be one possible interpretation of \'symmetrical\') --- it might just mean that they match in some other way --- for example, alternate red and green sectors... \'Symmetrical\' probably also refers to the fact that they are EQUAL sectors (rather than just 6 pieces of uneven size)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 23 mins (2005-04-06 12:14:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

CMJ:

I agree that a CAKE can be divided into 6 parts, of course, in everyday langauge; and by extension, I think anyone would agree that could apply also to the design on it.

My query was only with the word \'quadrant\', and I think this semantic discussion is EXTREMELY relevant, given the specifc nature of Asker\'s question: \"Can a quadrant mean 1/6 or not?\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 50 mins (2005-04-06 15:41:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Asker, this \'symmetrical\' can mean all sorts of things, and there are different types of symmetry. It might merely mean that the design is divided up into matching sections, or that the sections are similar or even completely identical, and it may be talking about rotational symmetry (same section repeated 6 times round centre point) or mirror-image symmetry (same design repeated on opposite sides of the cake, as if in a mirror)

Personally, I think CMJ is making a perfectly logical assumption that is is made up of 6 identical sections laid out around the centre...
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 23:39
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +36 sectors
Tony M
4 +2six-section symmetrical design
Refugio
4 +1a symmetrical design made up of 6 parts each with the shape of a quadrant
xxxCMJ_Trans
5hexagonal
bigedsenior
4yes, 6 parts and all of them should be the same
Maria Chmelarova
36 shelves in the form of a quadrant?
edith1


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
6 shelves in the form of a quadrant?


Explanation:
http://www.merriam-webster.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dicti... : 1b : a device or mechanical part shaped like or suggestive of the quadrant of a circle

edith1
Netherlands
Local time: 23:39
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in HebrewHebrew
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
a symmetrical design made up of 6 parts each with the shape of a quadrant


Explanation:
like a slice.....

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Note added at 2005-04-06 11:26:20 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

a quadrant is a quarter of a circle. That gives you the idea of the shape (like a slice of a round cake). So you must have 6 parts each with that wedge-like shape

OK for you Mr. Dusty-pedantic now?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 5 mins (2005-04-06 11:56:12 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Dusty - asker only wanted to understand. I was not offering a \"translation\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-04-06 12:06:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

symmetrical design - symmetry is the quality pf being made up of similar parts facing each other or around an axis. It means that all the parts must be the same and they must be laid out in a balanced pattern. For example, one half should be the mirror image of the other

xxxCMJ_Trans
Local time: 23:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Armorel Young: Yes, like a slice. I think the original simply uses a poorly-chosen word - segment would have been better.
7 mins
  -> people forget the original meaning of the word...

neutral  Tony M: I agree in principle with what you're saying, but we still can't say "shape of a quadrant", because that means 'a quarter circle' /// It's irritating when that happens! But quadrant is ONLY 1/4, NEVER 1/6 // Can't say '6 quadrants' except if 1.5 cakes!
21 mins
  -> well someone has removed an answer which contained a definition of a quadrant and that showed there was no problem. Now my answer is left hanging....
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
yes, 6 parts and all of them should be the same


Explanation:
If it is a round cake it should be devide in 6 parts and all of them the same.
Thesaurus-quadrant: part,sector (not for cake)

also semicircle and that is understood as: half circle, hemicycle, quadrant, sextan or sector ....


Maria Chmelarova
Local time: 17:39
Native speaker of: Slovak
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
six-section symmetrical design


Explanation:
It must be a round cake, and the description is of the design on top. I would avoid the use of "parts" or "pieces", since this implies three dimensions. Dusty's "sectors" is a little too mathematical for everyday language, as he agrees.

"Quadrant" is incorrectly used; nevertheless, the meaning can be deduced.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs 44 mins (2005-04-06 14:35:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A quadrant could be square if it were one-fourth of a square cake, but in the context of \"6-quadrant\", a square would not fit.

Refugio
Local time: 14:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Yes, I think for the design, 'section' works well
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Dusty!

agree  Robert Donahue
1 day 8 hrs
  -> Thanks, Rob
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
6 sectors


Explanation:
Assuming that this is indeed a ROUND cake (the only logical assumption I can make), I feel sure it just means 'divided/marked out into 6 equal SECTORS' --- please note that, strictly speaking, these are NOT 'segments', even though they are often loosely called that in everyday parlance. Here's the applicable OED definition of sector:

"A plane figure contained by two radii and an arc of a circle... which they intercept."

Note that (unlike in English) in French, the term 'quadrant' IS sometimes used (inaccurately IMO) to describe a sector other than an exact quarter of a circle.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 43 mins (2005-04-06 11:33:56 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I agree that the technically-correct term \'sector\' is relatively uncommon in everyday language, but be that as it may, \'quadrant\' is less \'correct\' --- by its very etymology, it means \' a quarter of something\', and should not ever be used, even very sloppily, to refer to a sector-shape that is other than a quarter-circle. See the applicable OED definition for \'quadrant\':

\"A plane figure bounded by two radii of a circle AT RIGHT ANGLES and the arc cut off by them\"


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 45 mins (2005-04-06 11:36:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Here\'s a ref. mentioning sectors in an illustrative fashion --- though note that the \'cake\' here is referring to a pie chart, not a REAL cake (pity!):

Oral presentations: 7. Tips for Visualization

No more than 3 columns in column diagrams. At most 6 sectors in cake diagrams ...

www.techfak.uni-kiel.de/matwis/amat/elmat_en/kap_1/advanced...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 56 mins (2005-04-06 11:47:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I agree that in everyday language, \'sector\' is unusual, and at best we often (incorrectly) find \'segment\'. But this context seems to be some kind of formal rules or specification, in which case I feel it is entirely appropriate to use the technically accurate and totally unambiguous term \'sector\':

\"Top must have a symmetrical design of 6 equal sectors\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 21 mins (2005-04-06 12:12:10 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Not necessarily the SAME (though that would be one possible interpretation of \'symmetrical\') --- it might just mean that they match in some other way --- for example, alternate red and green sectors... \'Symmetrical\' probably also refers to the fact that they are EQUAL sectors (rather than just 6 pieces of uneven size)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 23 mins (2005-04-06 12:14:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

CMJ:

I agree that a CAKE can be divided into 6 parts, of course, in everyday langauge; and by extension, I think anyone would agree that could apply also to the design on it.

My query was only with the word \'quadrant\', and I think this semantic discussion is EXTREMELY relevant, given the specifc nature of Asker\'s question: \"Can a quadrant mean 1/6 or not?\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs 50 mins (2005-04-06 15:41:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Asker, this \'symmetrical\' can mean all sorts of things, and there are different types of symmetry. It might merely mean that the design is divided up into matching sections, or that the sections are similar or even completely identical, and it may be talking about rotational symmetry (same section repeated 6 times round centre point) or mirror-image symmetry (same design repeated on opposite sides of the cake, as if in a mirror)

Personally, I think CMJ is making a perfectly logical assumption that is is made up of 6 identical sections laid out around the centre...

Tony M
France
Local time: 23:39
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxCMJ_Trans: "sectors" - come on Dusty! This I cannot believe (added) This is talking about a cake. Surely you can say "parts"? Anyway the question was to understand the English so this semantic discussion is OTT in my view. My explanation was merely that.
1 min
  -> Sorry, CMJ, but it's correct!

agree  Arcoiris
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Apricitas!

agree  Can Altinbay: Dusty, I agree with you that this loose usage is awful. Actually, rather than "sector" or "part", which I never use when referring to cakes, either, how about "slice" or "piece"?
3 hrs
  -> Thanks a lot, Can! I agree entirely for the cake itself, but remember we are talking here about the DESIGN ON the cake; would you say "a design in 6 slices"?

agree  Robert Donahue
1 day 11 hrs
  -> Thanks, Robert! :-)
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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
6 quadrant
hexagonal


Explanation:
Quadrant is misused here and it only has one "R".

bigedsenior
Local time: 14:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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