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miramiya

English translation: salvia

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:miramiya
English translation:salvia
Entered by: Sue Goldian
Options:
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15:36 Aug 8, 2002
English to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink / food
English term or phrase: miramiya
"To break up the intensity of a shopping spree, one can stop for tea spiced with miramiya
at one of the many coffee shops in the bazaar."

I could not find this word in any dictionary. Does this substance have any other name?
Fuad Yahya
salvia
Explanation:
FWIW, according to a Hebrew website about herbs and spices, salvia in English is marva in Hebrew and miramia in Arabic.

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Note added at 2002-08-10 21:27:22 (GMT)
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Note to Fuad -
This is the URL:
http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Bath/6482/Hebrew/plants/...

I\'m not sure about sage. Is sage exactly the same thing as salvia? If so, then miramiya is sage/salvia.
Selected response from:

Sue Goldian
Local time: 17:10
Grading comment
Thanks you, Sue. According to the English side of the web site you referenced, it is identical with sage. http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Bath/6482/english/menueng.html
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +3salviaSue Goldian
4 +2A spice for tea... common in cities of Jordanshfranke
4miramiya
Massimo Gaido
2 +1sweet potato
Yuri Geifman


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
miramiya


Explanation:
.

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Note added at 2002-08-08 15:47:54 (GMT)
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I did not find it translated.

Massimo Gaido
United States
Local time: 09:10
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sweet potato


Explanation:
It's just a guess based on the Dutch "zoete thee", which is supposedly what you're looking for.

Yuri Geifman
Canada
Local time: 10:10
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jerrie: This is what I found on Google, too
5 mins

neutral  Irene Chernenko: Tea spiced with sweet potato? Yuck!
51 mins
  -> LOL... there's no accounting for taste :-)

neutral  John Kinory: Isn't that a psychedelic plant? :-)
2 hrs
  -> oh, definitely... my girlfriend loves yams, and I see things every time we have them :-))
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
A spice for tea... common in cities of Jordan


Explanation:
Greetings/ taHaiya tayyiba wa b3ad....

I think miramiya is a spice - akin to mint leaves, IIRC - used to enhance the flavor of tea; common at restaurants in the main cities of Jordan, maybe also in Egypt.

HTH.

Regards.

Khair, in sha' Allah,

Steve Franke


    Residence and travel in Jordan
shfranke
United States
Local time: 07:10
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Libero_Lang_Lab
50 mins

agree  Antonio Camangi
1 hr

neutral  John Kinory: Same family as mint (Menta, Labiateae), but a different genus (Salvia)
2 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
salvia


Explanation:
FWIW, according to a Hebrew website about herbs and spices, salvia in English is marva in Hebrew and miramia in Arabic.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-08-10 21:27:22 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Note to Fuad -
This is the URL:
http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Bath/6482/Hebrew/plants/...

I\'m not sure about sage. Is sage exactly the same thing as salvia? If so, then miramiya is sage/salvia.


Sue Goldian
Local time: 17:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks you, Sue. According to the English side of the web site you referenced, it is identical with sage. http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Bath/6482/english/menueng.html

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yuri Geifman: interesting.. isn't that a psychedelic plant?
37 mins
  -> Thanks Yuri. Is it really? I had no idea.

agree  John Kinory: Never seen it used other than as a cooking herb (or is that spice?)
1 hr
  -> Thanks. I have it in the garden but I never use it for anything. I have seen it sold locally as herbal "tea" though. Personally I prefer coffee.

agree  Cristina Moldovan do Amaral: salvia is a plant from the mint family(salvia officinalis) Salvia divinorum is the psychedelic plant, Yuri, you're right :-)
1 hr
  -> Thanks Cristina
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