maternal grandchild

English translation: child of a woman's daughter

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:maternal grandchild
English translation:child of a woman's daughter
Entered by: Christopher Crockett

14:01 Nov 27, 2018
English to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Genealogy
English term or phrase: maternal grandchild
Most definitions I have seen of this term on-line use the following wording:

"the child of a woman's daughter: a grandchild to whom one is the maternal grandmother"

Example:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/maternal_grandchild

My question is whether it could also be "the child of a man's daughter" and "a grandchild to whom one is the maternal grandfather."

If not, why not? And what term should I more properly use to describe the child in such a relationship?
Amel Abdullah
Jordan
child of a woman's daughter
Explanation:
I've actually never seen this term used (it may be more common in the U.K. than in the U.S.), but the Wiki definition seems logical enough, so you could use it --though keep in mind that (if my experience is any indication), it might need clarification if your intended audience is British rather than American.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2018-11-27 15:24:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Now that I read it again, Piyush's terminology ("daughter's son/daughter") is unambiguous and works for all English dialect variants.
Selected response from:

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 05:14
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +2child of a woman's daughter
Christopher Crockett


Discussion entries: 17





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
child of a woman's daughter


Explanation:
I've actually never seen this term used (it may be more common in the U.K. than in the U.S.), but the Wiki definition seems logical enough, so you could use it --though keep in mind that (if my experience is any indication), it might need clarification if your intended audience is British rather than American.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2018-11-27 15:24:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Now that I read it again, Piyush's terminology ("daughter's son/daughter") is unambiguous and works for all English dialect variants.

Christopher Crockett
Local time: 05:14
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tina Vonhof
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Tina. Though it looks like Charles' opinion about the Wiki entry has merit --esp. if the term is not in common usage in the quaint U.K. dialect. Again, I maintain that Piyush's circumlocution (around an ambiguous term) is the clearest and best.

agree  Edith Kelly
3 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search