"sitting in" or "sitting on"

English translation: sitting in

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:"sitting in" or "sitting on"
English translation:sitting in
Entered by: mockingbird (X)

08:24 Apr 29, 2005
English to English translations [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: "sitting in" or "sitting on"
'Sitting in' or 'sitting on'?

The growing understanding of the importance of the role of law (or legal role?) in economy has made the directors and commissioners of various limited liability companies become more conscious that the chairs they are sitting in are not the soft ones that are free of risks.
mockingbird (X)
sitting in
Explanation:
It really depends on the chair. If it has got arms, you sit in, but if it doesn't you sit on.

I'd say "sit in" since it is far more common (at least in google), puls chairs, in a business context, do normally have arms.

Selected response from:

Jaime Oriard
Mexico
Local time: 06:15
Grading comment
Thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +15sitting in
Jaime Oriard
2 +5sitting on
Natalie Wilcock (X)
3 +1the positions they occupy are neither easy nor free of risk.
RHELLER
4The case can be made for both depending on the style you prefer (FOR COMPARISON ONLY)
Robert Donahue (X)
3the chiars they fill
petya yakova


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +5
sitting on
sitting on


Explanation:
how about "...the chairs they are sitting on are no longer the cushy, risk-free number they were used to?" Bringing in cushy (cushion, soft, etc).
Just a shot.

Natalie Wilcock (X)
Local time: 13:15
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Laurens Landkroon: far better suggestion than the one mentioned by Jaime....... You want to emphesize the "deeper" meaning of "chairs" here (metaphoric), in my opinion, the word is not used simply to describe an "object" you sit in..........
37 mins
  -> Thanks a lot, Somerset. My sentiments exactly. ;-)

neutral  David Moore: It's a business context, and IMO, "in" fits that context better
45 mins
  -> Fair enough, David. Regards, Natalie

agree  Robert Donahue (X): "plush/cushy chairs they're sitting on"
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Robert.

agree  Ian M-H (X)
2 hrs
  -> Thanks again Ian.

agree  humbird: Good shot.
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, humbird.

agree  Shane London: I agree completely with Somerset's comments. Spot on.
14 hrs
  -> Thanks Shane.
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +15
sitting in


Explanation:
It really depends on the chair. If it has got arms, you sit in, but if it doesn't you sit on.

I'd say "sit in" since it is far more common (at least in google), puls chairs, in a business context, do normally have arms.



Jaime Oriard
Mexico
Local time: 06:15
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Ali Beikian
6 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  cello: I'd use 'in' for the same reasons as you give 8-)
11 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
25 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Maria Otero
28 mins
  -> Tnaks María

agree  David Moore
42 mins
  -> Thanks David

agree  Craig Meulen
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  marybro: chair with arms, "in" this is what we teach in ESL
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  conejo
6 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Can Altinbay: This is the best answer. It is most natural to say "in". Whereas Rita has a great suggestion, I hate to lose the simplicity of the original metaphor.
6 hrs
  -> Thank you Can A.

agree  Robert Donahue (X): I see your point Jaime. I posted a comparison of "in" and "on" for your perusal. I think both work pretty well. So this is a "Pick 'em". :-)
8 hrs
  -> By saying "it's far more common" I meant to imply that both are correct and used, but that, IMO, one is more common than the other, so it was confirmed by google. I agree with Can Altinbay and David Moor that in this context "in" sounds more natural.

agree  Pawel Gromek
12 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  tappi_k
13 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  jennifer newsome (X)
1 day 7 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Alfa Trans (X)
2 days 1 hr
  -> Gracias

agree  Will Matter
3 days 10 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
sitting in/on
the chiars they fill


Explanation:
to fill the chair-to hold a high post

petya yakova
Bulgaria
Local time: 14:15
Native speaker of: Native in BulgarianBulgarian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  SSL-Maida B
27 mins
  -> thanks

disagree  Ian M-H (X): This really doesn't sound like a natural English way of saying this to me. // Natalie's answer is fine and it's also possible to make a case for Jaime's answer.
29 mins
  -> what would you suggest?
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
sitting in/on
the positions they occupy are neither easy nor free of risk.


Explanation:
alternative

the legal role in THE economy.....liability companies ....conscious that the positions they occupy are neither easy nor free of risk.

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 05:15
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 92

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robert Donahue (X): If you want to get away from the chair metaphor, this is the way to go.
8 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
The case can be made for both depending on the style you prefer (FOR COMPARISON ONLY)


Explanation:
First off, this is not an answer (nor is it for grading). Depending on the style you prefer, you can use either of the answers suggested. I think you should stick with the chair metaphor because it's very effective (IMO).

The case for "in";
The growing understanding of the importance of the role of law in the economy has made directors and commissioners of various limited liability companies more conscious of the fact that the chairs they sit in are neither soft ones nor free from risk.

The case for "on";
The growing understanding of the importance of the role of law in the economy has made directors and commissioners of various limited liability companies more conscious of the fact that the chairs they sit on are neither soft ones nor free from risk.

Robert Donahue (X)
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
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