sick

English translation: ill

15:38 May 2, 2016
English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
Social Sciences - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / book on parenting
English term or phrase: sick
Hi,
I’m not completely sure whether, in the context below, I should interpret “sick” literally as “ill” or whether in this case it might have also another meaning ("grumpy" or “annoyed”, maybe?). The passage is taken from a book on parenting.

Thank you in advance for your help!

*****
When you talk about your own life, what are your most common complaints? (My oldest son is so lazy; My kids never pick up after themselves; I’m so tired; I’m feeling sad about what happened at work today; Why do I have to be the parent whose kid is * sick * all the time?….). As you’re writing, take notice of whether your complaints are phrased as states (“I feel”) or traits (“I am”) – but don’t change them! Write them down as you would normally think or say them.
haribert
Local time: 23:37
Selected answer:ill
Explanation:
I thought the parent was going to say something like "I'm sick of my kids' behaviour" but here "sick" just means ill...I presume the parent has to go home early or take a day off work to take her child to the doctor.

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Note added at 21 mins (2016-05-02 15:59:34 GMT)
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You are most welcome :)
Selected response from:

Louisa Tchaicha
Tunisia
Local time: 22:37
Grading comment
Thank you to all of you for your help and useful explanations!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +9ill
Louisa Tchaicha
4 +1Take it literally
Jack Doughty
4 +1ill (literally)
Sheri P
4making excuses
Charlesp


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
ill (literally)


Explanation:
I interpret the complaint as: Why am I the parent whose kid is ill (literally) all the time. I don't think it's directly connected to the previous complaints about kids' behavior.

Sheri P
United States
Local time: 17:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 52
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, Sheri, for your help!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheila Wilson: Not really ill but just stomach bugs, headaches, slight fevers etc - just enough to upset the rhythm of family life
4 hrs
  -> Yes, that's true.
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Take it literally


Explanation:
Sick used like this could only mean "ill". It can mean ill in the more restricted sense of vomiting, but that does not apply here.
You can of course be sick of your children, i.e. fed up with them, but that again does no apply here, or you might find them sickening (disgusting), but not in this context.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:37
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 370
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, Jack, for your explanation! My doubt derived from the fact that I would feel sorry for my child, if he(she is ill... But I understand that repetead episodes could also cause problems to a working mother o father...


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Phoenix III
2 hrs
  -> Thank you.
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6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +9
ill


Explanation:
I thought the parent was going to say something like "I'm sick of my kids' behaviour" but here "sick" just means ill...I presume the parent has to go home early or take a day off work to take her child to the doctor.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 mins (2016-05-02 15:59:34 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You are most welcome :)

Louisa Tchaicha
Tunisia
Local time: 22:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you to all of you for your help and useful explanations!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you, Louisa, for your help!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Daria Toropchyn
1 min
  -> Thanks!

agree  Sheri P
1 min
  -> Thanks!

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa
14 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: you were first
42 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  katsy
1 hr
  -> Thanks!

agree  Jean-Claude Gouin
5 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  philgoddard
6 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Edith Kelly
12 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  acetran
1 day 17 hrs
  -> Thank you!
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9 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
making excuses


Explanation:
not meant literally.

Meaning they are complaining of being sick, while not really being ill.

So 'sick' should have quotes around the word.

Charlesp
Sweden
Local time: 23:37
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
Notes to answerer
Asker: Hi, I think this also may be an interpretation...maybe "the truth lies somewhere in the middle" - maybe the child isn't feeling completely well, but exaggerates his "sickness". Thank you for your contribution!

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