put it up to me

English translation: really gave me a hard time/challenged me to my limit

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:put it up to me
Selected answer:really gave me a hard time/challenged me to my limit
Entered by: Yvonne Gallagher

18:49 Oct 31, 2016
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Art/Literary - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: put it up to me
Hello everyone,

John Kavanagh (famous MMA coach) describes his job as a doorman.

So here I was, a young man who had never been in a proper fight, trying to maintain order on the doors of some of the busiest bars and nightclubs in Dublin. I worked in various places, but most often in a big pub in Temple Bar called the Turk’s Head and a nightclub near O’Connell Bridge called Redz. From the very start I constantly
got abuse, night after night. I wasn’t on the door watching out for the school principal during a playful game of Royal Rumble any more. This was the real thing."

If I refused someone admission, they’d always ***put it up to me*** because I looked so young and unintimidating. But this was my time to face the demons. These were the exact kind of guys I was scared of in school and who had smashed me to pieces in Rathmines.

Before asking here I asked this question on another forum and a native speaker of American English answered as follows: "I'm not certain what Kavanagh means by "put it up to me". However I suspect it is a British or specifically Irish expression."

I also looked "put up" in the dictionary

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/put-up

but none of the definitions seems appropriate for the context.

Based on context I think the phrase implies some kind of disrespectful and/or agressive behaviour, but would like to know for sure.

Thank you.
Mikhail Korolev
Local time: 14:21
really gave me a hard time/challenged me to my limit
Explanation:
(Hello from San Francisco! At ATA conference

Yes, it's a challenge as Charles has said but it is more than that as it is a very testing and trying challenge where someone is really pushed to their limit. I'm a Dubliner and am absolutely sure of the meaning here (and I have been in both of those bars/nightclubs as well, though about 10 years ago. Both very popular bars/discos which are always full of people on the weekend)
This guy is young, has never been in a real fight and does not look intimidating. And now he's a "bouncer" (security guard on door). Lots of times when people are refused entry they will turn nasty (and sometimes will pull a knife) but will certainly try to push past the bouncer so it's not a question of him losing face but he must stop them getting in (as this type of drunk/aggressive male could cause mayhem inside the packed club). Because these clubs are so popular and always packed, many will be refused entry, especially if they are already drunk or off their heads on drugs. By causing havoc and trying to intimidate the bouncer they are also stopping the free entrance of other people into the club as the bouncer has to get these guys away from the door first before he can let others in. So, it's a major hassle when people start challenging a bouncer's authority and keep up a barrage of verbal abuse or threaten physical action
Most bouncers look like gorillas, big and bulky so this guy doesn't even look the part (but might be a martial arts master???), so"put it up to me" means the yobbos refused to go away quietly when refused admission but challenged his authority big time and verbally abused him while refusing to leave. Sometimes bouncers will call on bouncers from another bar to help them and will also call the police if they really can't get someone to leave or an actual physical fight breaks out. So the bouncer doesn't have to think just of his own safety but of the other people waiting to get in the club.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2016-11-01 15:29:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

in another context like " she put it up to me to come up with a good design" would mean that I was pushed to my very limit, or even to surpass myself to come up with a design...it was really hard for me to do this, =extremely testing
Selected response from:

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 11:21
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone.

Thank you, Gallagy.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +8confront me, challenge me
Charles Davis
5 +2really gave me a hard time/challenged me to my limit
Yvonne Gallagher
1 +3raise their fists to me
Tony M
3 -1ils essayaient de m'en imposer
Olivier Latil


  

Answers


29 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5 peer agreement (net): +3
raise their fists to me


Explanation:
I'm not familiar with it either as a British EN expression, but I suspect it is very likely Irish, and we do have some very helpful Irish contributors on here who may be able to help.

My GUESS would be it means 'raise their fists to me' — with the same sort of sense as 'put up or put out'; or if not literally show their fists, at least challenge his authority in a less directly physical way.

There are number of expressions associated with 'put' and 'up' that suggest menacing someone with a fist fight: "Go on, put 'em up!" etc.

I hope someone will soon come along with a more authoritative answer for you!

Tony M
France
Local time: 12:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 297

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jack Doughty
42 mins
  -> Thanks, Jack!

agree  David Hollywood: that's the idea but Charles's answer is more graphic
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, David! I agree.

agree  airmailrpl: What's 'Put 'em up' mean? | Yahoo Answers https://answers.yahoo.com/question/?qid=20070430073855AAvIhE... Apr 30, 2007 - "You ball your fist up and put them up" Now we are ready to fight! Swing! black-eye! bulls-eye! you better put 'em
8 hrs
  -> Thanks, airmailrpl!
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35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
ils essayaient de m'en imposer


Explanation:
Je pense que cela doit être le sens général de cette expression, dans ce contexte.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 42 mins (2016-10-31 19:32:02 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

In english, that would be "to impress", I think

Olivier Latil
Argentina
Local time: 08:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  AllegroTrans: EN explanation needed and anyway this is nothing about "impressing"
4 hrs
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37 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
confront me, challenge me


Explanation:
I don't know this as a British expression either but it's fairly common in Ireland and from the context it seems to mean not literally raise your fists (though that may be the origin) but more generally challenge or confront somebody. It's use quite often in sporting confrontations to mean putting up a good fight (metaphorically). The following example suggests provocation:

"All they did was confront youths standing at Aldo’s and the youths ran off. They also smashed up one car. But this was about saving face after these kids put it up to them last week with the graffiti at the top of Donegall Road."
http://republican-news.org/current/news/2010/08/graveyard_at...

This seems to imply doing something that obliges the other party to fight back or lose face.

This one, from the Irish Law Society Gazette, is not about physical fighting (I presume) but clearly means "challenge":

"John Glynn has hit the road running since he took up the mantle just a few weeks ago from Geraldine Kelly – a president who has certainly put it up to poor John.
But it’s a challenge he’ll take in his stride."
https://www.lawsociety.ie/Documents/Gazette/Gazette 2012/Dec...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 hrs (2016-11-01 02:32:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

An example of the sporting use of the expression:

"even though we didn't win any of our games we really put it up to the opposition and gave them a good run for their money"
http://carrigtwohillunited.com/trips/u13march2013.html

In this source text, of course, it could mean that they actually picked a fight with him, but not necessarily; it could just be that they tried to intimidate him.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 hrs (2016-11-01 08:27:16 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, "put 'em up", which has been quoted, definitely does mean put your fists up (and be prepared to fight), and is used in Britain, but "put it up to" is a different expression.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 12:21
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 572

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
6 mins
  -> Thanks, Tony!

agree  Veronika McLaren
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Veronika :)

agree  David Hollywood: no doubt about it
7 hrs
  -> Many thanks, David :)

agree  Thayenga: ;)
10 hrs
  -> Thanks, Thayenga ;)

agree  mike23
15 hrs
  -> Thanks, Mike :)

agree  B D Finch
16 hrs
  -> Thanks, Barbara!

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa
16 hrs
  -> Thanks, Yasutomo-san :)

agree  acetran
5 days
  -> Thanks, acetran :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
really gave me a hard time/challenged me to my limit


Explanation:
(Hello from San Francisco! At ATA conference

Yes, it's a challenge as Charles has said but it is more than that as it is a very testing and trying challenge where someone is really pushed to their limit. I'm a Dubliner and am absolutely sure of the meaning here (and I have been in both of those bars/nightclubs as well, though about 10 years ago. Both very popular bars/discos which are always full of people on the weekend)
This guy is young, has never been in a real fight and does not look intimidating. And now he's a "bouncer" (security guard on door). Lots of times when people are refused entry they will turn nasty (and sometimes will pull a knife) but will certainly try to push past the bouncer so it's not a question of him losing face but he must stop them getting in (as this type of drunk/aggressive male could cause mayhem inside the packed club). Because these clubs are so popular and always packed, many will be refused entry, especially if they are already drunk or off their heads on drugs. By causing havoc and trying to intimidate the bouncer they are also stopping the free entrance of other people into the club as the bouncer has to get these guys away from the door first before he can let others in. So, it's a major hassle when people start challenging a bouncer's authority and keep up a barrage of verbal abuse or threaten physical action
Most bouncers look like gorillas, big and bulky so this guy doesn't even look the part (but might be a martial arts master???), so"put it up to me" means the yobbos refused to go away quietly when refused admission but challenged his authority big time and verbally abused him while refusing to leave. Sometimes bouncers will call on bouncers from another bar to help them and will also call the police if they really can't get someone to leave or an actual physical fight breaks out. So the bouncer doesn't have to think just of his own safety but of the other people waiting to get in the club.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2016-11-01 15:29:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

in another context like " she put it up to me to come up with a good design" would mean that I was pushed to my very limit, or even to surpass myself to come up with a design...it was really hard for me to do this, =extremely testing

Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 11:21
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 503
Grading comment
Many thanks to everyone.

Thank you, Gallagy.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M
26 mins
  -> Many thanks:-)

agree  Charles Davis: Well, you should know! But I was more or less right :) // PS. Forgot to say, hope you have had a great time in SF!
4 hrs
  -> Many thanks, yes, you were close!? //Thanks Charles!...am still in SF as conference only starts Thurs (here till 6th and was in LA for 4 days 27th -31st. Having a ball & spending a lot! )
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