kind regards vs best regards

English translation: greetings

16:36 Jan 31, 2004
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: kind regards vs best regards
Kindly explain and define the both terms which are generally used in the end of letter. I would appreciate if you could also explain the basic difference between the two and which one should be used in different circumstances.
Jagmohan
English translation:greetings
Explanation:
Regards is a synonym for greetings. Either phrase would be used in a formal letter; you wouldn't use these greetings in a letter to a close friend or family member. Kind sounds a bit warmer than best, but basically the two are interchangeable.

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Note added at 6 mins (2004-01-31 16:42:35 GMT)
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Quote from Webster:

regard
4b (1) : a feeling of respect and affection : ESTEEM <his hard work won him the regard of his colleagues> (2) plural : friendly greetings implying such feeling <give him my regards>

http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=reg...
Selected response from:

ntext
United States
Local time: 14:30
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +16greetings
ntext
5 +8Regarding regards
cheungmo
4 +1best regards is Euro-English
David Knowles
4regards
sergey (X)
4letter closings
RHELLER


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +16
greetings


Explanation:
Regards is a synonym for greetings. Either phrase would be used in a formal letter; you wouldn't use these greetings in a letter to a close friend or family member. Kind sounds a bit warmer than best, but basically the two are interchangeable.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 mins (2004-01-31 16:42:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Quote from Webster:

regard
4b (1) : a feeling of respect and affection : ESTEEM <his hard work won him the regard of his colleagues> (2) plural : friendly greetings implying such feeling <give him my regards>

http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary?book=Dictionary&va=reg...

ntext
United States
Local time: 14:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in category: 36
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Russi: no difference
5 mins

agree  Mary Worby: I would say you would use them in a semi-formal context - perhaps not on a letter to a solicitor, but on a letter to a customer or similar
8 mins

agree  swisstell
30 mins

agree  Alaa Zeineldine: with Mary. More professional than "enjoy!" or "cheers!", but friendlier than "yours truly" & co.
31 mins

agree  hookmv
59 mins

agree  Iolanta Vlaykova Paneva
1 hr

agree  PB Trans
1 hr

agree  jerrie
1 hr

agree  Patricia Baldwin: with you and Mary and Alaa too .Enjoy!
2 hrs

agree  Oso (X)
5 hrs

agree  Nado2002
6 hrs

agree  Asghar Bhatti
12 hrs

agree  Annamaria Leone
15 hrs

agree  Denise Spies: could be used in letter to an acquiantance, less familiar than "warmest"
21 hrs

agree  MatthewS
1 day 13 hrs

agree  vixen: with Mary
1 day 20 hrs
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
best regards is Euro-English


Explanation:
In my experience, "best regards" is not much used by native speakers, but is widely used by non-native speakers writing in English (e.g. translation agencies). It may well be an example of the international language diverging from the native UK or US language. Maybe it's a translation from another language.

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Note added at 1 hr 35 mins (2004-01-31 18:11:21 GMT)
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\"With kindest regards\" is recorded in 1835 in the Oxford English Dictionary, but \"best regards\" isn\'t recorded. I\'d say \"best regards\" is a translation of German \"beste Grusse\". \"Best wishes\" and \"kind regards\" are certainly English.

David Knowles
Local time: 20:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Mary Worby: Interesting ;-) Agree that it's widely used by non-natives, but I would say it's also in common parlance among natives. Maybe it's just the ones I'm in contact with! ;-)
4 mins

neutral  Chris Rowson (X): I think it´s a modern development. I used to always write "Yours sincerely" for moderately formal and "Yours faithfully" for fully formal, as I was taucht, but that was some time ago, and a few years ago I was informed I was way behind the times ...
31 mins
  -> I'd agree it (which?) is modern, and in use particularly for work-related emails. However, I'm still not convinced by "best regards"!

neutral  PB Trans: I'd say "best regards" is more commonly used here in Canada (than "kind regards")
1 hr

neutral  Catherine Bolton: Hate to break it to you, but we Americans use "best regards" in any kind of letter, formal or informal.
2 hrs
  -> Looks like I'll have to concede! It doesn't seem to me to be UK English though.

neutral  Cilian O'Tuama: best regards (or 'best', as some people abbreviate it) doesn't sound right to my ear either, but I receive a lot of mails from English native speakers who use it.
3 hrs

neutral  Leah Aharoni: agree w/ cbolton best regards is very common in US, though I wouldn't write that in a formal letter
4 hrs

agree  Subhamay Ray (X): Yes, I'm a bit conservative in this respect, like you!
11 hrs

neutral  Rowan Morrell: I use "best regards" all the time, and I'm a native English speaker - from New Zealand at that!
12 hrs

neutral  Refugio: In the US, best regards is much more common than kind regards.
15 hrs

neutral  IanW (X): Nothing wrong with "best regards" as far as I'm concerned, whereas fellow Dubliner Cilian says that it doesn't sound right to his ear. Perhaps it purely a question of taste, nothing more.
17 hrs

neutral  Eva Olsson: Both are listed in my dictionary (Norstedt).
4 days
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
regards


Explanation:
1. good wishes:
e.g.
Give him my (best) regards
2. with kind/best/warm regards (a friendly but rather formal way of ending a letter)

Longman Dictionary of English Language and Culture

nothing about 'best regards' being Pigeon English

sergey (X)
Local time: 20:30
PRO pts in category: 8
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
letter closings


Explanation:
sincerely is the most common in the U.S.

Complimentary Closing

The complimentary closing should convey the level of formality and degree of personal feeling that the writer has for the reader.

The complimentary closing (omitted in the simplified letter format) appears two lines below the last line of text. Its alignment varies with the format of the letter:

In block letters, the complimentary closing
appears flush with the left margin.

In modified and semiblock letters, the
complimentary appears right of center or may
be flush with the right margin.

Complimentary closings for business letters include:

Sincerely, Sincerely yours, Thank you,
Complimentary closings for informal letters include:

Best wishes, Kindest regards, Regards,

Best regards, Cordially,
Complimentary closings for very formal letters (those addressed to dignitaries and high officials) include:

Yours sincerely, Respectfully yours, Respectfully,
The word "truly" has become a cliche and should be avoided in letter closings.


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Note added at 2 hrs 29 mins (2004-01-31 19:05:48 GMT)
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http://www.kanten.com/styleguide/letelem.html

RHELLER
United States
Local time: 13:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 92
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +8
Regarding regards


Explanation:
English-speaking culture, at least North-American anglo culture, is not terribly formal and rigid. A particular circumstance does not dictate or require that phrase X, and *only* phrase X be used. Probably a natural consequence of the large proportion of first- and second-generation non-anglo immigrants here. So use whatever you prefer.

My take on sign-offs.
The "regards" sign-off on letters is very versatile, and I'm surprised it isn't used more. I have a feeling that most people rely on, and will never deviate from, whatever Miss Marples taught them in Third Grade Elementary.

One of the letter-writing tools available in French which I sorely miss in English is the multitude of levels and ranges of politeness and distance available to a letter writer. Ranging from "Ton ami" (Your friend) and "Espérant le tout conforme" ("Hoping all this is OK", more or less, for certain short business letters)to "Daignez agréer l'assurance de ma parfaite considération" (May you condescend to be pleased to receive my assurances that I hold you in the highest regard, sorta) a French letter writer can be sure to express a level of consideration appropriate to a particular circumstance and to the relationship between the writer and the recipient. They can sometimes be so elaborate that one can (intentionally) bury a well-disguised insult in an otherwise polite and flowery sign-off.

There is nevertheless a small range of common sign-offs available to letter-writers in English.

Regards
"Regards" are not limited to "best" and "kind". You can also express "warm regards" (more affectionate), "respectful regards" (obvious, that one), "loving regards", etc. You can even stretch it out to something like "Please accept my most respectful regards" if you feel the circumstance requires it.

Your something-or-other
For personal letters, you can sign-off with "Your whatever something", as in "Your loving son", "Your faithful friend" (in a letter expressing support and solidarity, for example), "Your brother in arms", "etc.

Yours
Used to the point that it is has become meaningless. People will occasionally sign-off even a business letter with "yours truly" which, in my opinion, is a mistake. One can tell a lover that one belongs to him or her ("yours truly" means "I really am yours", "I belong to you") but it strikes me as inappropriate in formal or business correspondence.

Sincerely
Also used to the point that it is has become meaningless. It seems to me that "sincerely" should only be used in a letter in which the author reveals something surprising, hidden, shocking, etc. to the recipient and the letter-writer wishes to assure the recipient that he/she is being sincere. In most circumstances, the letter itself should make it obvious the author is being sincere.

Trusting/Hoping ...
"Trusting this finds you in good health", for example, expresse the wish that the recipient is well and would be entirely appropriate when the recipient is/was sick, injured, aged, or may have been the victim of some calamity (an earthquake, a flood). "Hoping things are well", for example, runs at at a friendlier register than "Trusting..." example given earlier. You can elaborate and adapt this sort of sign-off to the circumstance as well.

So, use whatever you feel like and best expresses the tone of the letter, your relationship with the recipient, and/or your personality. Try to avoid long-winded or the less-common sign-offs for most circumstance but don't be afraid to use whatever strikes you best.


cheungmo

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anita Milos: thank you for this wonderful lesson :-)
8 mins

agree  Hermann: In a nutshell ;-)
3 hrs

agree  Nancy Arrowsmith
4 hrs

agree  Subhamay Ray (X): Excellent!
7 hrs

agree  lien: Thank you to explain, I remember now why I keep coming back here
20 hrs

agree  vixen
1 day 16 hrs

agree  Rahi Moosavi: Learnt a lot, thanks!
3 days 12 hrs

agree  Tomez Cao
7 days
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