with some of our dearly departed

English translation: with some of our relatives or friends that have died

18:09 Apr 13, 2019
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: with some of our dearly departed
It seemed that we could request an audience with some of our dearly departed just as efficiently as if we had called them on the phone, and each in turn appeared only too eager to communicate with us, one letter at a time.


I cannot really understand the text, especially the part in question. Can someone explain? Thanks in advance!
Masoud Kakoli
Iran
Local time: 11:25
Selected answer:with some of our relatives or friends that have died
Explanation:
dear(ly) departed
euphemism One who has died. Myrna was a wonderful woman, and we are all gathered here today to remember our dearly departed.
See also: departed
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Selected response from:

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:55
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
5 +12with some of our relatives or friends that have died
AllegroTrans
3conjure up our dear dead ones
Juan Arturo Blackmore Zerón
4 -3with some of our dearly who passed away
MPGS


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -3
with some of our dearly who passed away


Explanation:
:-)

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Note added at 14 mins (2019-04-13 18:23:58 GMT)
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our family/ friends ... that havr died

MPGS
Local time: 08:55
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  AllegroTrans: "Our dearly who passed away" is not a phrase used in English
19 mins
  -> Thanks for your opinion, AllegroTrans

neutral  Tony M: As used in this text, it is debatable — the more usual expression is 'dear departed'; but as you have sought to use it, trying to make 'dearly' [an adverb] into a noun, it is just plain wrong.
1 hr
  -> thank you, Tony :-)

disagree  Yvonne Gallagher: With AT
2 hrs
  -> Thanks Yvonne

disagree  Anna Herbst: I'm with Tony as well.
6 hrs
  -> Thank you Annaa
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
conjure up our dear dead ones


Explanation:
We could conjure up our dear dead ones as easily as to call them up by phone.

Juan Arturo Blackmore Zerón
Mexico
Local time: 01:55
Native speaker of: Spanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Using a Ouija board, you donc't really "conjure them up", it is just like textos with the deados.
1 hr

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: with Tony
1 hr
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +12
with some of our relatives or friends that have died


Explanation:
dear(ly) departed
euphemism One who has died. Myrna was a wonderful woman, and we are all gathered here today to remember our dearly departed.
See also: departed
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.



AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 07:55
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bashiqa: Fits the bill.
22 mins
  -> thsnks

agree  Jennifer Caisley: Exactly - this is precisely what I'd say it means!
34 mins
  -> thsnks

agree  Daryo: Euphemisms tend to be silly (and puzzling and or misleading if you take them literally) slang is far more interesting ...-
1 hr
  -> thsnks

agree  Tony M
1 hr
  -> thsnks

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: ["Faithful Departed" perhaps?]
1 hr
  -> thsnks, reminds me of a Christy Moore song somwhere in the back of my (ageing) mind...[Yes, that's it]

agree  JohnMcDove: Magister dixit. :-)
1 hr
  -> thsnks

agree  Robert Forstag: A rather quaint expression that is much more likely to be heard in the mouth of a pastor officiating at a funeral than from someone to whom the deceased was actually “dear.”
3 hrs
  -> true, thanks

agree  Anna Herbst
6 hrs

agree  Charles Davis
7 hrs

agree  Amel Abdullah
12 hrs

agree  Joshua Parker
23 hrs

agree  Mikhail Korolev
23 hrs
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