process of dying

14:45 Apr 18, 2019
This question was closed without grading. Reason: Other

English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / coming up with synonyms
English term or phrase: process of dying
How to say "he was dying away of starvation" (the process) without using the word "dye"? I can think about "fading", but I am not sure.

Thank you.
boostrer
United States
Local time: 14:14


SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +4he was wasting from starvation
Oliveira Simões
3 +3to wither away from starvation
Taña Dalglish
3 -3the course of losing force/strength gradually
Juan Arturo Blackmore Zerón
2 -2Melting of starvation
Sina Salehi
Summary of reference entries provided
use of die away-not used with people actually dying afaik
writeaway

Discussion entries: 11





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Melting of starvation


Explanation:
-

Sina Salehi
United Kingdom
Local time: 19:14
Native speaker of: Native in Farsi (Persian)Farsi (Persian)
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  writeaway: Well, it's highly original at least
4 mins
  -> Yes, I guess it is.

neutral  JohnMcDove: How about "vanishing away" for a Potterian magic act? ;-)
2 hrs
  -> That's cool I think :)

disagree  AllegroTrans: application of heat??
3 hrs

disagree  Yvonne Gallagher: really? How does one "melt" from starvation?//No, it doesn't mean that at all//No, it doesn't.
21 hrs
  -> It is a metaphor! It means fading gradually. Of course it does.

neutral  Daryo: with a shovelful (or two) of poetic licence, maybe ... or if the starting point was "clinically obese", another "maybe".
4 days
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13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
he was wasting from starvation


Explanation:
"They spoke in dazed, hushed tones of seeing upward of one hundred corpses along the trail, wasted from starvation." - https://books.google.com/books?id=OVAiCgAAQBAJ&pg=PA104&lpg=...

Oliveira Simões
United States
Local time: 12:14
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: "Waste" would be my choice, and "from" is the right preposition; but although you can be wasted from starvation, as a intransitive verb "waste away" is more common and idiomatic than just "waste": "he was wasting away from starvation" would be fine.
35 mins
  -> Thank you, Charles.

agree  JohnMcDove: A little bit of context would be in order, but yes.
1 hr
  -> Thank you, John.

agree  AllegroTrans: this works but I cannot really see the point of the akser's question
3 hrs

agree  Yvonne Gallagher: waste AWAY from is the idiom. But also don't see point of Asker's question
3 days 18 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -3
the course of losing force/strength gradually


Explanation:
In this case: dying away/losing force or strength gradually of/because starvation.

Juan Arturo Blackmore Zerón
Mexico
Local time: 13:14
Native speaker of: Spanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Yvonne Gallagher: "the course of losing force" is not idiomatic English
19 hrs

disagree  Tina Vonhof: This is not correct English.
22 hrs

disagree  AllegroTrans: Not correct English
3 days 7 hrs
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
to wither away from starvation


Explanation:
wither away - Translation into Arabic - examples English | Reverso ...
https://context.reverso.net/translation/english-arabic/withe...
She'd wither away like someone dying of thirst or starvation. ... believes that it would be a great step backward if the plan were simply allowed to wither away.

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Note added at 3 hrs (2019-04-18 18:17:06 GMT)
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Comment only: I agree with Allegro that "dying of starvation" is a common phrase, but not "dying away of starvation". It is assumed that English is not the Asker's native language, and the "question" (if you call it that) appears useless without additional context (which has been requested!).

Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Local time: 14:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JohnMcDove: Ditto. :-) (re: context)
1 hr
  -> Thanks John. I agree about the context.

agree  AllegroTrans: OK but why Arabic?
3 hrs
  -> Thanks. I don't get you ... Arabic? I said nothing about Arabic! (if you are referring to the 1st link - that is just the header - open the link!). It matters nought!//Was just use of the words "to wither away". I didn't mean to send an Arabic link.

agree  Tina Vonhof
6 hrs
  -> Thank you Tina.
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Reference comments


24 mins peer agreement (net): +5
Reference: use of die away-not used with people actually dying afaik

Reference information:
If something, especially a sound, dies away, it gradually becomes reduced until it stops existing or disappears:
The sound of his footsteps gradually died away.
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/die-away

writeaway
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Charles Davis: I agree. I think the asker means becoming weaker (and thinner).
24 mins
agree  Robert Forstag
1 hr
agree  JohnMcDove
1 hr
agree  Yvonne Gallagher: "he was dying away of starvation" is NOT standard English that's for sure. And insufficient context to know what is required exactly
2 days 37 mins
agree  AllegroTrans: Not standard English but maybe either a world variant or simply the effort of a non-native EN speaker
3 days 9 hrs
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