domiciled

English translation: officially and intentionally resident at - for the purpose of serving legal documents

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:domiciled
Selected answer:officially and intentionally resident at - for the purpose of serving legal documents
Entered by: B D Finch

08:45 Aug 29, 2019
English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
Law/Patents - General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / Mr X of (address 1) domiciled in (address 2)
English term or phrase: domiciled
What is the difference between address and domicile
Isabelle P.
officially and intentionally resident at - for the purpose of serving legal documents
Explanation:
"Migrants
https://www.litrg.org.uk/tax-guides/migrants/residence-and-d...
"Working out which country you are domiciled in can be complicated and there are many factors which need to be considered. There are three main types of domicile – domicile of origin, domicile of dependence and domicile of choice. You may also be ‘deemed UK domiciled’, irrespective of your actual domicile. We explain each of these below."



https://domicile.uslegal.com/distinctions-between-domicile-a...
"Domicile is a person’s permanent place of dwelling. It is a legal relationship between a person and a locality. It may or may not be of same meaning as the term ‘residence’.

The concept of domicile has different meanings in different context. For purposes of jurisdiction, “domicile” means a legal residence which is the place where a person has fixed dwelling with an intention of making it his/her permanent home[i].

Domicile is a combination of two factors namely, residence and intent to remain. As the term domicile includes residence, the scope and significance of the term domicile is larger than the term residence. An individual may have several residences whereas; s/he will have only one domicile. Domicile is more used in reference to personal rights, duties and obligations[ii]. ..."



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Note added at 5 days (2019-09-03 09:34:13 GMT)
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@Asker
I think "domicile of origin" is unlikely to be correct, as this would mean the first domicile a person had, which might not be their current domicile. For instance, my domicile of origin is in the UK, while my current domicile is in France.

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Note added at 5 days (2019-09-03 09:35:50 GMT)
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The distinction between "résidence" and "domicile" in French is, to the best of my knowledge, the same as that between residence and domicile in English.
Selected response from:

B D Finch
France
Local time: 12:54
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +5officially and intentionally resident at - for the purpose of serving legal documents
B D Finch


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
officially and intentionally resident at - for the purpose of serving legal documents


Explanation:
"Migrants
https://www.litrg.org.uk/tax-guides/migrants/residence-and-d...
"Working out which country you are domiciled in can be complicated and there are many factors which need to be considered. There are three main types of domicile – domicile of origin, domicile of dependence and domicile of choice. You may also be ‘deemed UK domiciled’, irrespective of your actual domicile. We explain each of these below."



https://domicile.uslegal.com/distinctions-between-domicile-a...
"Domicile is a person’s permanent place of dwelling. It is a legal relationship between a person and a locality. It may or may not be of same meaning as the term ‘residence’.

The concept of domicile has different meanings in different context. For purposes of jurisdiction, “domicile” means a legal residence which is the place where a person has fixed dwelling with an intention of making it his/her permanent home[i].

Domicile is a combination of two factors namely, residence and intent to remain. As the term domicile includes residence, the scope and significance of the term domicile is larger than the term residence. An individual may have several residences whereas; s/he will have only one domicile. Domicile is more used in reference to personal rights, duties and obligations[ii]. ..."



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2019-09-03 09:34:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

@Asker
I think "domicile of origin" is unlikely to be correct, as this would mean the first domicile a person had, which might not be their current domicile. For instance, my domicile of origin is in the UK, while my current domicile is in France.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 5 days (2019-09-03 09:35:50 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The distinction between "résidence" and "domicile" in French is, to the best of my knowledge, the same as that between residence and domicile in English.

B D Finch
France
Local time: 12:54
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 192
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks for the clear explanations. I think I will use "domicile of origin" and "domicile" to make a distinction between "résidence" and "domicile" in French.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  gilbertlu: "domicilié" à (lieu) l'adresse où on a élu domicile (juridique)
23 mins
  -> Merci

agree  Bashiqa
23 mins
  -> Merci

agree  Liane Lazoski
1 hr
  -> Merci

agree  pillu: IP
1 hr
  -> Merci - "IP"?

agree  jccantrell: Yeah, in the USA you can have a Post Office Box as your address but that is not your domicile.
5 hrs
  -> Thanks. That goes for the UK too.

neutral  AllegroTrans: caution; you can also be "domiciled" for tax prurposes, it's not just for serving documents. Asker hasn't given us any text. Mark's scholarly answer in DBox better answers the question.
15 hrs
  -> Thanks AT. Yes, indeed.
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