entrées

English translation: UK: starters; US: main courses

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:entrées
Selected answer:UK: starters; US: main courses
Entered by: Mohamed Fouda

18:26 May 21, 2020
English language (monolingual) [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters / food&drink/restaurants
English term or phrase: entrées
We ordered two entrées to split, and a big-ass jug of margarita.

Does it refer to the main course of a meal or to snacks and appetizers that are presented before the main course? It could be tricky.
Mohamed Fouda
Egypt
Local time: 09:06
UK: starters; US: main courses
Explanation:
"Big-ass margaritas" sounds very American English. So for their meal they probably shared two main course dishes and the jug of margarita.

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Note added at 1 hr (2020-05-21 19:26:22 GMT)
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However, I've just seen another of your questions, and that one asks about "savoury". That's the British English spelling (versus "savory"). So a lot is going to depend on the greater context.

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Note added at 1 hr (2020-05-21 20:20:36 GMT)
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I'm glad they aren't connected, Asker. That was confusing me.
Selected response from:

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 07:06
Grading comment
Thank you all so much!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
4 +6UK: starters; US: main courses
Sheila Wilson
4main course of a meal
Lydia De Jorge
5 -2Starters
Rocsana Guignaudeau


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
main course of a meal


Explanation:
,

Lydia De Jorge
United States
Local time: 01:06
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Rocsana Guignaudeau: The "main course " is "plat" en français
29 mins
  -> This is ENGLISH monolingual. The word is indeed french but in the US it is used to refer to the main course.

agree  Katya Kesten
36 mins
  -> Thank you, Katya.
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Starters


Explanation:
I live in France. "Entrée" is a "Starter". An "Entrée" in France could be quite copious and one can eat a starter, cheese and dessert without eating a main dish.

Rocsana Guignaudeau
France
Local time: 08:06
Native speaker of: Native in RomanianRomanian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Sheila Wilson: But this is an English monolingual question.// It's in every English dictionary.
15 mins
  -> It's a monolingual question using a French word. The translation of this French word in UK English, is "Starter"

disagree  Tony M: Yes, but you have misunderstood: this US usage actually mis-uses the FR word, so the original meaning is irrelevant
25 mins

disagree  Lydia De Jorge: As Tony points out, the French meaning is irrelevant here.
47 mins
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53 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
UK: starters; US: main courses


Explanation:
"Big-ass margaritas" sounds very American English. So for their meal they probably shared two main course dishes and the jug of margarita.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2020-05-21 19:26:22 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

However, I've just seen another of your questions, and that one asks about "savoury". That's the British English spelling (versus "savory"). So a lot is going to depend on the greater context.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2020-05-21 20:20:36 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I'm glad they aren't connected, Asker. That was confusing me.

Sheila Wilson
Spain
Local time: 07:06
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 28
Grading comment
Thank you all so much!
Notes to answerer
Asker: This text sounds American to me, too, and it has nothing to do with my previous question. The other text where the world savoury was mentioned is a British reality TV show called 'The Great British Baked Off'.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: I agree, this seems to be US programme material, and I feel sure this is the intended meaning: after all, we don't really use 'entrée' in BE, unless in a FR menu or something; unlike in AE, where it is used quite ordinarily. 'Fraid they just got it wrong!
12 mins
  -> Thanks, Tony. Very odd use though, IMO

agree  Becca Resnik: All of these statements are correct.
14 mins
  -> Thanks, Becca

agree  philgoddard: As a Brit living in the US, I can never remember which country uses which meaning. It's like red and blue states.
21 mins
  -> Thanks, Phil. We used to search out French restaurants until we left the UK 26 years ago

agree  Yvonne Gallagher
28 mins
  -> Thanks, Yvonne

agree  Tina Vonhof
18 hrs
  -> Thanks, Tina

agree  AllegroTrans: As someone who hasn't ever gone transatlantic I didn't know this and I am amazed, yet you have convinced me
1 day 3 hrs
  -> Thanks, AllegroTrans. I'm an old hand - 2 nights (not days) near Orlando and one afternoon in Miami airport
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