disabled/invalid

English translation: invalid =weakened, feeble, disabled may be strong

19:58 Apr 11, 2005
English to English translations [Non-PRO]
General / Conversation / Greetings / Letters
English term or phrase: disabled/invalid
disabled/invalid/handicaped/incapacitated
severe disabled

could you please explain what is the difference between these terms in English UK?
Thank you
Benoit Copatious
English translation:invalid =weakened, feeble, disabled may be strong
Explanation:
An invalid is someone who is what I would call incapacitated (ie unable to do certain things, as the translator with hands in plaster)by illness or injury. They are dependent on other people.
Disabled people just means people who don't have all their normal faculties - blind, deaf, with one leg missing, but also with epilepsy, schizophrenia, severe memory loss. Handicapped can be seen as more patronising, but means the same thing. A disabled person can compete in the disabled Olympics,for example, (whereas an invalid certainly couldn't.)
Incapacitated means made incapable in some way. This could be by drink, even, or by a disability, or by illness. It would probably more often be used to describe a temporary condition, but not invariably.

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Note added at 1 hr 12 mins (2005-04-11 21:10:52 GMT)
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Severely disabled would be used to describe someone like the scientist Stephen Hawkins, who has difficulty moving on his own and has to use a special machine to speak, for example. It is a matter of opinion, to a certain extent, but someone who has lost both their legs or is schizophrenic would probably also be in this category, as someone with bad epilepsy could be, but not with mild epilepsy.
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mportal
Local time: 04:04
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Summary of answers provided
4 +3*explanation*
Michael Schubert
4 +3invalid =weakened, feeble, disabled may be strong
mportal
5All meanings follow (encyclopedia)
Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com (X)
3 +1a bit more
Charlie Bavington (X)


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
a bit more


Explanation:
No particular arguments with Michael (was it - you can't see other answers when you do this!!)

Handicapped & disabled are largely synonynous, and it can be either mental or physical, congenital or something that has developped/happened. Both terms cover most things

Invalid would usually imply a disability resulting from injury, e.g. war invalids. And would be physical not mental, and permanent or at least very long term

Incapacitated - also physical, usually. Usually temporary by implication, although possibly long-lasting. Also implication that the "condition" only precludes certain activities, and does not affect "life in general", e.g. incapacitated for work (such as a translator with both hands in plaster!)



Charlie Bavington (X)
Local time: 04:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Schubert: Important added information with which I fully agree!
29 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
invalid =weakened, feeble, disabled may be strong


Explanation:
An invalid is someone who is what I would call incapacitated (ie unable to do certain things, as the translator with hands in plaster)by illness or injury. They are dependent on other people.
Disabled people just means people who don't have all their normal faculties - blind, deaf, with one leg missing, but also with epilepsy, schizophrenia, severe memory loss. Handicapped can be seen as more patronising, but means the same thing. A disabled person can compete in the disabled Olympics,for example, (whereas an invalid certainly couldn't.)
Incapacitated means made incapable in some way. This could be by drink, even, or by a disability, or by illness. It would probably more often be used to describe a temporary condition, but not invariably.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr 12 mins (2005-04-11 21:10:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Severely disabled would be used to describe someone like the scientist Stephen Hawkins, who has difficulty moving on his own and has to use a special machine to speak, for example. It is a matter of opinion, to a certain extent, but someone who has lost both their legs or is schizophrenic would probably also be in this category, as someone with bad epilepsy could be, but not with mild epilepsy.

mportal
Local time: 04:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio
11 mins
  -> Thanks Ruth

agree  juvera
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, juvera

agree  Saleh Chowdhury, Ph.D.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Saleh
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
All meanings follow (encyclopedia)


Explanation:
Please check the following links from an encyclopedia:

www.thefreedictionary.com/disabled
www.the freedictionary.com/invalid
www.thefreedictionary.com/incapacitated
www.the freedictionary.com/severely+disabled
wwww.thefreedictionary.com/handicapped

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Note added at 1 hr 45 mins (2005-04-11 21:44:12 GMT)
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www.thefreedictionary.com/invalid
www.thefreedictionary.com/severely disabled

Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com (X)
France
Local time: 05:04
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charlie Bavington (X): the Asker did request UK English and this is American (e.g. disability check). I will concede, however, that differences in PC sensibilities aside, the definitions in this case are probably similar :-)
1 hr
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11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
*explanation*


Explanation:
I predict you'll get a lot of feedback on this question, as so much of this language is under siege from "linguistically/politically correct" hypersensibilities ... but here goes:

DISABLED/HANDICAPPED are more or less synonymous, are used as adjectives or adjectival nouns ("the disabled") to describe people primarily with physical disabilities. In particular, these words designate those who qualify for special protection under the law or benefits from the state. People will argue over which one of these two words is currently "in fashion," but fashion is all it is; they mean the same thing and are both currently in wide use.

INVALID in this context is used only as a noun; an invalid is someone who is wounded (as in war) or handicapped.

SEVERELY DISABLED is the augmentation of disabled, e.g. someone who is partially or wholly paralyzed.

INCAPACITATED means hindered and is often used to describe a temporary state.

I speak from a perspective of US-EN; I'll let any Brits who may be online at this hour add whatever distinctions are relevant for UK-EN.

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Note added at 18 hrs 23 mins (2005-04-12 14:21:34 GMT)
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A basic problem with such language is the misunderstanding of what distinguishes a pejorative from a word that simply describes an unpleasant reality. \"Retarded\" and \"crippled,\" for example, were never pejorative, but they are hardly ever uttered any more because they are deemed too harsh. In time, \"special needs\" and \"disabled\" will sound similarly harsh, and the linguistic carousel will spin anew. Ironically, it\'s not the disabled themselves who care about these distinctions (they\'ve got more pressing concerns!) but their (admittedly well-meaning) fully abled advocates. The approach of saying \"people with disabilities\" rather than \"the disabled,\" so as not to define people wholly by their condition, is not w/o merit, but to apply it without exception simply makes for ungainly writing. If fully abled people learn to be as comfortable talking about disabilities as the disabled themselves, this problem would disappear.

Michael Schubert
United States
Local time: 20:04
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charlie Bavington (X): Indeed, I see I have repeated a lot of what you said :-) (in my defence, I wanted to make the physical/mental distinction in a couple of cases, and you can't see other answers when you're writing your own)
13 mins
  -> No problemo and no defense necessary. I agree w/your distinctions but felt my answer was already too long-winded :-)

neutral  Refugio: I believe that "people with disabilities" is more used now, so as not to make a noun label out of what is only one human characteristic among many (that is to say, people with disabilities prefer not to be totally defined by them).//On the contrary.
50 mins
  -> Yes, that is true and I'm aware of it. It's part of what I referred to in my first sentence.

agree  Anna Maria Augustine at proZ.com (X)
1 hr

agree  Robert Donahue (X)
4 days
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